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Howard Rachlin [58]Howard C. Rachlin [1]
  1.  18
    Maximization Theory in Behavioral Psychology.Howard Rachlin, Ray Battalio, John Kagel & Leonard Green - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):371.
  2.  26
    Pain and Behavior.Howard Rachlin - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):43-83.
    There seem to be two kinds of pain: fundamental pain, the intensity of which is a direct function of the intensity of various pain stimuli, and pain, the intensity of which is highly modifiable by such factors as hypnotism, placebos, and the sociocultural setting in which the stimulus occurs.
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  3. Behavior and Mind: The Roots of Modern Psychology.Howard Rachlin - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This book attempts to synthesize two apparently contradictory views of psychology: as the science of internal mental mechanisms and as the science of complex external behavior. Most books in the psychology and philosophy of mind reject one approach while championing the other, but Rachlin argues that the two approaches are complementary rather than contradictory. Rejection of either involves disregarding vast sources of information vital to solving pressing human problems--in the areas of addiction, mental illness, education, crime, and decision-making, to name (...)
     
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  4.  38
    Self-Control: Beyond Commitment.Howard Rachlin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):109-121.
    Self-control, so important in the theory and practice of psychology, has usually been understood introspectively. This target article adopts a behavioral view of the self (as an abstract class of behavioral actions) and of self-control (as an abstract behavioral pattern dominating a particular act) according to which the development of self-control is a molar/molecular conflict in the development of behavioral patterns. This subsumes the more typical view of self-control as a now/later conflict in which an act of self-control is a (...)
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  5.  5
    From Overt Behavior to Hypothetical Behavior to Memory: Inference in the Wrong Direction.Howard Rachlin - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):147.
  6.  8
    The Elusive Quale.Howard Rachlin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):692.
  7. Behavior, Cognition and Theories of Choice.Hugh M. Lacey & Howard Rachlin - 1978 - Behaviorism 6 (2):177-202.
    Critics have argued that behaviorism must necessarily be inadequate to account for complex human behavior whereas cognitive psychology is adequate to account for such behavior. Recently, Fodor has focused this criticism on certain situations in which humans choose among a set of alternatives. We argue that this criticism applies to forms of behaviorism that are reductionistic but not to non-reductionistic behaviorisms like that of Skinner. Non-reductionistic behaviorism can be used to interpret human choice situations of varying degrees of complexity. Such (...)
     
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  8. Your Use of the JSTOR Archive Indicates Your Acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, Available At.Howard Rachlin - 1974 - Behaviorism 2 (1):94-107.
     
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  9.  13
    Maximization Theory and Plato's Concept of the Good.Howard Rachlin - 1985 - Behaviorism 13 (1):3-20.
    Plato's dialogues may be interpreted in a number of ways. One interpretation sees Plato's concept of The Good as a precursor of maximization theory, a modern behavioral theory. Plato identifies goodness with an ideal pattern of people's overt choices under the constraints of everyday life. Correspondingly, maximization theory sees goodness (in terms of "value") as a quantifiable function of overt, constrained choices of an animal. In both conceptions goodness may be increased by expanding the temporal extent over which a behavioral (...)
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  10.  4
    Mental, Yes. Private, No.Howard Rachlin - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):566.
  11.  2
    Learning Theory in its Niche.Howard Rachlin - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):155.
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  12.  8
    Choice, Rate of Response, and Rate of Gambling.Howard C. Rachlin & Marvin Frankel - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3p1):444.
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  13.  3
    Maximization Theory Vindicated.Howard Rachlin, Ray Battalio, John Kagel & Leonard Green - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):405.
  14.  1
    The Effect of Rotation on the Learning of Taste Aversions.Leonard Green & Howard Rachlin - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (2):137-138.
  15.  50
    Altruism and Selfishness.Howard Rachlin - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):239-250.
    Many situations in human life present choices between (a) narrowly preferred particular alternatives and (b) narrowly less preferred (or aversive) particular alternatives that nevertheless form part of highly preferred abstract behavioral patterns. Such alternatives characterize problems of self-control. For example, at any given moment, a person may accept alcoholic drinks yet also prefer being sober to being drunk over the next few days. Other situations present choices between (a) alternatives beneficial to an individual and (b) alternatives that are less beneficial (...)
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  16.  9
    Who Cares If the Chimpanzee has a Theory of Mind?Howard Rachlin - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):593.
  17.  11
    The Teleological Science of Self-Control.Howard Rachlin - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):367-369.
    In response to Ainslie & Gault: The value of a temporally extended behavioral pattern depends on relationships inherent in the pattern itself. It is not possible to express that value as the simple sum of the discounted present values of the pattern's component acts.
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  18.  38
    The Uses of Self-Deception.Howard Rachlin & Marvin Frankel - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):124-125.
    The essence of a mental event such as self-deception lies in its function – its place in the life of an animal. But the function of self-deception corresponds to that of interpersonal deception. Therefore self-deception, contrary to Mele's thesis, is essentially isomorphic with interpersonal deception.
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  19.  34
    Altruism is a Form of Self-Control.Howard Rachlin - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):284-291.
    Some commentators have argued that all particular altruistic acts are directly caused by or reinforced by an internal emotional state. Others argue that rewards obtained by one person might reinforce another person's altruistic act. Yet others argue that all altruistic acts are reinforced by social reciprocation. There are logical and empirical problems with all of these conceptions. The best explanation of altruistic acts is that – though they are themselves not reinforced (either immediately, or delayed, or conditionally, or internally) – (...)
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  20.  1
    Cognition and Behavior in Studies of Choice.Howard Rachlin, A. W. Logue, John Gibbon & Marvin Frankel - 1986 - Psychological Review 93 (1):33-45.
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  21.  2
    Variable-Interval and Fixed-Interval Schedule Preferences in Pigeons as a Function of Signaled Reinforcement and Schedule Length.Sandra M. Schrader & Howard Rachlin - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (6):445-448.
  22.  9
    Biological Evolution and Behavioral Evolution: Two Approaches to Altruism.Howard Rachlin, Matthew L. Locey & Vasiliy Safin - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):96-96.
    Altruism may be learned (behavioral evolution) in a way similar to that proposed in the target article for its biological evolution. Altruism (over social space) corresponds to self-control (over time). In both cases, one must learn to ignore the rewards to a particular (person or moment) and behave to maximize the rewards to a group (of people or moments).
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  23.  7
    Self-Control Observed.Howard Rachlin - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):148-159.
    Complex cases of self-control involve processes such as guilt-avoidance, inhibition, self-punishment, conscious thought, free will, and imagination. Such processes, conceived as internal mediating mechanisms, serve the function in psychological theory of avoiding teleological causation. Acceptance of the scientific legitimacy of teleological behaviorism would obviate the need for internal mediation, redefine the above processes in terms of temporally extended patterns of overt behavior, and clarify their relation to selfcontrol.
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  24.  5
    Theory-Theory Theory.Howard Rachlin - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):72.
  25.  5
    Minds, Pains, and Performance.Howard Rachlin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):341.
  26.  13
    Autonomy From the Viewpoint of Teleological Behaviorism.Howard Rachlin - 2003 - Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):245-264.
    I will argue that the autonomy of a particular act of a particular person depends on the pattern of behavior in which it is embedded. I call this conditional autonomy. A person's act is conditionally autonomous or not, relative to other acts at other times. Consider an example of a person crossing the street. On the one hand, this act might not be done for its own sake, but may fit into some ongoing long-term behavioral pattern that is personally beneficial (...)
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  27.  3
    Is It Possible That Pain is One Thing?Howard Rachlin - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):755.
  28.  4
    The Cognitive Laboratory, the Library and the Skinner Box.Howard Rachlin - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):501.
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  29.  4
    Temporal Molarity in Behavior.Howard Rachlin - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):711.
  30.  4
    Suffering as a Behaviourist Views It.Howard Rachlin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):32.
  31.  4
    The Behaviorist Reply.Howard Rachlin - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):444.
  32.  4
    The Concept of Leisure in Maximization Theory.Howard Rachlin, Ray Battalio, John Kage & Leonard Green - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):330.
  33.  4
    Ghostbusting.Howard Rachlin - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):73-83.
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  34.  3
    Optimality and Aristotle's Concept of Final Cause.Howard Rachlin - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):623.
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  35.  3
    The International Stance Faces Backward.Howard Rachlin - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):373.
  36.  2
    Only External Representations Are Needed.Howard Rachlin - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):261.
  37.  1
    Learning Rules and Learning Rules.Howard Rachlin - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):113.
  38.  3
    Two Cheers for Behavioral Momentum.Howard Rachlin - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):110-111.
    Behavioral momentum is a useful metaphor reminding us that with constant conditions, ongoing behavior – in the form of response rate – would be expected to remain constant. But despite an impressive array of behavioral experiments, the concept has not yet been applied in a way that would make it useful as a general behavioral law.
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  39. Brian Lahren.Jay Moore, Edward Morris, Stanley Pliskoff, Howard Rachlin, George Reynolds, Todd Risley, William Rozeboom, Tr Sarbin, Wn Schoenfeld & Evalyn Segal - 1981 - Behaviorism 9:128.
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  40. Biological Relevance.Howard Rachlin - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):144.
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  41. Contrast and Matching.Howard Rachlin - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (3):217-234.
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  42. How to Decide Between Matching and Maximizing: A Reply to Prelec.Howard Rachlin - 1983 - Psychological Review 90 (4):376-379.
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  43. In-Group Bias is a Kind of Egoistic Incentive.Howard Rachlin - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):718.
  44. In Defense of Teleological Behaviorism.Howard Rachlin - 2017 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 37 (2):65-76.
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  45. Journey Into the Interior of the Organism.Howard Rachlin - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):180-181.
  46. Substitutability in Time Allocation.Howard Rachlin, John H. Kagel & Raymond C. Battalio - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (4):355-374.
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  47.  1
    The Escape of the Mind.Howard Rachlin - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    The Escape of the Mind argues that, in developing techniques of self-control and social cooperation, it is useful to question the almost universally accepted belief that our minds exist inside our bodies. We should look for our minds neither in our introspections nor in our brains, but in our long-term behavioral patterns.
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  48. The Temporal Triangle: Response Substitution in Instrumental Conditioning.Howard Rachlin & Barbara Burkhard - 1978 - Psychological Review 85 (1):22-47.