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Hubert Dreyfus
University of California, Berkeley
  1. What Computers Can’T Do: The Limits of Artificial Intelligence.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1972 - Harper & Row.
  2. What Computers Still Can’T Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1992 - MIT Press.
    A Critique of Artificial Reason Hubert L. Dreyfus . HUBERT L. DREYFUS What Computers Still Can't Do Thi s One XZKQ-GSY-8KDG What. WHAT COMPUTERS STILL CAN'T DO Front Cover.
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  3. Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Paul Rabinow - 1983 - Routledge.
    This book is the first to provide a sustained, coherent analysis of Foucault's work as a whole. To demonstrate the sense in which Foucault's work is beyond structuralism and hermeneutics, the authors unfold a careful, analytical exposition of his oeuvre. They argue that during the of Foucault's work became a sustained and largely successful effort to develop a new method - "interpretative analytics" - capable of explaining both the logic of structuralism's claim to be an objective science and the apparent (...)
     
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  4. Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being in Time, Division I.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1990 - Bradford.
    Essays discuss the themes of worldliness, affectedness, understanding, and the care-structure found in Heidegger's work on the nature of existence.
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  5. The Return of the Myth of the Mental.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2007 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 50 (4):352 – 365.
    McDowell's claim that "in mature human beings, embodied coping is permeated with mindedness",1 suggests a new version of the mentalist myth which, like the others, is untrue to the phenomenon. The phenomena show that embodied skills, when we are fully absorbed in enacting them, have a kind of non-mental content that is non-conceptual, non-propositional, non-rational and non-linguistic. This is not to deny that we can monitor our activity while performing it. For solving problems, learning a new skill, receiving coaching, and (...)
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  6. Intelligence Without Representation – Merleau-Ponty’s Critique of Mental Representation.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):367-83.
    Existential phenomenologists hold that the two most basic forms of intelligent behavior, learning, and skillful action, can be described and explained without recourse to mind or brain representations. This claim is expressed in two central notions in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: the intentional arc and the tendency to achieve a maximal grip. The intentional arc names the tight connection between body and world, such that, as the active body acquires skills, those skills are “stored”, not as representations in the mind, (...)
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  7.  29
    On the Internet.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2001 - Routledge.
    _Internet_ is een van de eerste boeken waarin het filosofische inzicht -van Plato tot Kierkegaard - betrokken wordt op het debat over de mogelijkheden en onmogelijkheden van het internet. Dreyfus laat zien dat de onstoffelijke, 'vrij zwevende' websurfer zijn oorsprong vindt in Descartes' scheiding van geest en lichaam, en hoe Kierkegaards inzichten in de opkomst van het moderne leespubliek vooruitlopen op de nieuwsgierige, maar elk risico vermijdende internet-junkie. Uitgaande van recente onderzoeken naar het isolement dat veel internetgebruikers ervaren, toont Dreyfus (...)
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  8. Intelligence Without Representation – Merleau-Ponty's Critique of Mental Representation the Relevance of Phenomenology to Scientific Explanation.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):367-383.
    Existential phenomenologists hold that the two most basic forms of intelligent behavior, learning, and skillful action, can be described and explained without recourse to mind or brain representations. This claim is expressed in two central notions in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: the intentional arc and the tendency to achieve a maximal grip. The intentional arc names the tight connection between body and world, such that, as the active body acquires skills, those skills are stored, not as representations in the mind, (...)
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  9. Overcoming the Myth of the Mental: How Philosophers Can Profit From the Phenomenology of Everyday Expertise.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2005 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 79 (2):47 - 65.
    Back in 1950, while a physics major at Harvard, I wandered into C.I. Lewis’s epistemology course. There, Lewis was confidently expounding the need for an indubitable Given to ground knowledge, and he was explaining where that ground was to be found. I was so impressed that I immediately switched majors from ungrounded physics to grounded philosophy.
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  10. Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Science.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Harrison Hall (eds.) - 1982 - MIT Press.
  11. Why Heideggerian Ai Failed and How Fixing It Would Require Making It More Heideggerian.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2007 - Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):247 – 268.
  12.  53
    All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2011 - Free Press.
    Our contemporary nihilism -- Homer's polytheism -- From Aeschylus to Augustine : monotheism on the rise -- From Dante to Kant : the attractions and dangers of autonomy -- Fanaticism, polytheism, and Melville's "evil art" -- David Foster Wallace's nihilism -- Conclusion : lives worth living in a secular age.
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  13.  19
    Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I.Mark Okrent & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):290.
  14. Response to McDowell.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2007 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 50 (4):371 – 377.
    In previous work I urged that the perceptual experience we rational animals enjoy is informed by capacities that belong to our rationality, and - in passing - that something similar holds for our intentional action. In his Presidential Address, Hubert Dreyfus argued that I thereby embraced a myth, "the Myth of the Mental". According to Dreyfus, I cannot accommodate the phenomenology of unreflective bodily coping, and its importance as a background for the conceptual capacities exercised in reflective intellectual activity. My (...)
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  15. Overcoming the Myth of the Mental.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2006 - Topoi 25 (1-2):43-49.
    Can we accept John McDowell’s Kantian claim that perception is conceptual “all the way out,” thereby denying the more basic perceptual capacities we seem to share with prelinguistic infants and higher animals? More generally, can philosophers successfully describe the conceptual upper floors of the edifice of knowledge while ignoring the embodied coping going on on the ground floor? I argue that we shouldn’t leave the conceptual component of our lives hanging in midair and suggest how philosophers who want to understand (...)
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  16. 20. What Computers Can’T Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1972 - In Bernard Williams (ed.), Essays and Reviews: 1959-2002. Princeton University Press. pp. 90-100.
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  17.  84
    Skillful Coping: Essays on the Phenomenology of Everyday Perception and Action.Hubert L. Dreyfus (ed.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    For fifty years Hubert Dreyfus has done pioneering work which brings phenomenology and existentialism to bear on the philosophical and scientific study of the mind. This is a selection of his most influential essays, developing his critique of the representational model of the mind in analytical philosophy of mind and mainstream cognitive science.
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  18.  9
    Intelligence Without Representation: The Relevance of Phenomenology to Scientific Explanation.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):367-383.
    Existential phenomenologists hold that the two most basic forms of intelligent behavior, learning, and skillful action, can be described and explained without recourse to mind or brain representations. This claim is expressed in two central notions in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: the intentional arc and the tendency to achieve a maximal grip. The intentional arc names the tight connection between body and world, such that, as the active body acquires skills, those skills are “stored”, not as representations in the mind, (...)
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  19.  47
    Body and World.Samuel Todes, Hubert L. Dreyfus & Piotr Hoffman - 2001 - MIT Press.
    Body and World is the definitive edition of a book that shouldnow take its place as a major contribution to contemporary existentialphenomenology. Samuel Todes goes beyond Martin Heidegger and MauriceMerleau-Ponty in his description of how independent physical natureand experience are united in our bodily action. His account allows himto preserve the authority of experience while avoiding the tendencytoward idealism that threatens both Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty.Todes emphasizes the complex structure of the human body ;front/back asymmetry, the need to balance in a (...)
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  20. Towards a Phenomenology of Ethical Expertise.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Stuart E. Dreyfus - 1991 - Human Studies 14 (4):229 - 250.
  21.  36
    A Companion to Heidegger.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.) - 2005 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  22. Refocusing the Question: Can There Be Skillful Coping Without Propositional Representations or Brain Representations? [REVIEW]Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):413-25.
  23.  91
    Holism and Hermeneutics.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (1):3 - 23.
    OF THE many issues surrounding the new interest in hermeneutics, current debate has converged upon two.
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  24. The Current Relevance of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Embodiment.Hubert L. Dreyfus - unknown
    In this paper I would like to explain, defend, and draw out the implications of this claim. Since the intentional arc is supposed to embody the interconnection of skillful action and perception, I will first lay out an account of skill.
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  25.  61
    Ways of the Hand: A Rewritten Account.David Sudnow & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2001 - MIT Press.
    Ways of the Hand tells the story of how David Sudnow learned to improvise jazz on the piano. Because he had been trained as an ethnographer and social psychologist, Sudnow was attentive to what he experienced in ways that other novice pianists are not. The result, first published in 1978 and now considered by many to be a classic, was arguably the finest and most detailed account of skill development ever published.Looking back after more than twenty years, Sudnow was struck (...)
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  26.  25
    Refocusing the Question: Can There Be Skillful Coping Without Propositional Representations or Brain Representations?Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):413-425.
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  27.  40
    Heidegger and the Philosophy of Mind.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (3):524-529.
  28. The Current Relevance of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Embodiment.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1998 - Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy.
    In this paper I would like to explain, defend, and draw out the implications of this claim. Since the intentional arc is supposed to embody the interconnection of skillful action and perception, I will first lay out an account of skill.
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  29. The Primacy of Phenomenology Over Logical Analysis: A Critique of Searle.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (2):3-24.
  30. Intentionality and the Phenomenology of Action.Jerome C. Wakefield & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1991 - In Ernest Lepore & Robert Van Gulick (eds.), John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  31. A Phenomenology of Skill Acquisition as the Basis for a Merleau-Pontian Nonrepresentational Cognitive Science.Hubert L. Dreyfus - manuscript
  32. Coping with Things-in-Themselves: A Practice-Based Phenomenological Argument for Realism.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Charles Spinosa - 1999 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):49-78.
    Against Davidsonian (or deflationary) realism, it is argued that it is coherent to believe that science can in principle give us access to the functional components of the universe as they are in themselves in distinction from how they appear to us on the basis of our quotidian concerns or sensory capacities. The first section presents the deflationary realist's argument against independence. The second section then shows that, although Heidegger pioneered the deflationary realist account of the everyday, he sought to (...)
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  33. Being and Power: Heidegger and Foucault.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1996 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (1):1 – 16.
    being, culminating in the technological understanding of being, in order to help us understand and overcome our current way of dealing with things as objects and resources, Foucault analyzes several regimes of power, culminating in modern bio-power, in order to help us free ourselves from understanding ourselves as subjects.
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  34. Reply to Romdenh-Romluc.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2007 - In Thomas Baldwin (ed.), Reading Merleau-Ponty: On Phenomenology of Perception. Routledge.
     
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  35. The Challenge of Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Embodiment for Cognitive Science.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Stuart E. Dreyfus - 1999 - In Gail Weiss & Honi Fern Haber (eds.), Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersections of Nature and Culture. Routledge. pp. 103--120.
     
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  36. A Merleau-Pontyian Critique of Husserl’s and Searle’s Representationalist Accounts of Action.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (3):287-302.
    Husserl and Searle agree that, for a bodily movement to be an action, it must be caused by a propositional representation. Husserl's representation is a mental state whose intentional content is what the agent is trying to do; Searle thinks of the representation as a logical structure expressing the action's conditions of satisfaction. Merleau-Ponty criticises both views by introducing a kind of activity he calls motor intentionality, in which the agent, rather than aiming at success, feels drawn to reduce a (...)
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  37. Interpreting Heidegger on Das Man.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1995 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):423 – 430.
    In their debate over my interpretation of Heidegger's account of das Man in Being and Time, Frederick Olafson and Taylor Carman agree that Heidegger's various characterizations of das Man are inconsistent. Olafson champions an existentialist/ontic account of das Man as a distorted mode of being?with. Carman defends a Wittgensteinian/ontological account of das Man as Heidegger's name for the social norms that make possible everyday intelligibility. For Olafson, then, das Man is a privative mode of Dasein, while for Carman it makes (...)
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  38. A History of First Step Fallacies.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (2):87-99.
    In the 1960s, without realizing it, AI researchers were hard at work finding the features, rules, and representations needed for turning rationalist philosophy into a research program, and by so doing AI researchers condemned their enterprise to failure. About the same time, a logician, Yehoshua Bar-Hillel, pointed out that AI optimism was based on what he called the “first step fallacy”. First step thinking has the idea of a successful last step built in. Limited early success, however, is not a (...)
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  39. From Micro-Worlds to Knowledge Representation: AI at an Impasse.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1981 - In J. Haugel (ed.), Mind Design. MIT Press. pp. 161--204.
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  40.  11
    Hermeneutics and Holism.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (1):3-23.
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  41.  49
    The Socratic and Platonic Basis of Cognitivism.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1988 - AI and Society 2 (2):99-112.
    Artificial Intelligence, and the cognitivist view of mind on which it is based, represent the last stage of the rationalist tradition in philosophy. This tradition begins when Socrates assumes that intelligence is based on principles and when Plato adds the requirement that these principles must be strict rules, not based on taken-for-granted background understanding. This philosophical position, refined by Hobbes, Descartes and Leibniz, is finally converted into a research program by Herbert Simon and Allen Newell. That research program is now (...)
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  42.  1
    The Ethical Implications of the Five-Stage Skill-Acquisition Model.Stuart E. Dreyfus & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (3):251-264.
    We assume that acting ethically is a skill. We then use a phenomenological description of five stages of skill acquisition to argue that an ethics based on principles corresponds to a beginner’s reliance on rules and so is developmentally inferior to an ethics based on expert response that claims that, after long experience, the ethical expert learns to respond appropriately to each unique situation. The skills model thus supports an ethics of situated involvement such as that of Aristotle, John Dewey, (...)
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  43.  1
    Why Heideggerian AI Failed and How Fixing It Would Require Making It More Heideggerian.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2007 - Artificial Intelligence 171 (18):1137-1160.
  44. Making a Mind Versus Modeling the Brain: AI at a Crossroads.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Stuart E. Dreyfus - 1988 - Daedalus.
  45.  20
    The Primacy of Phenomenology Over Logical Analysis.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (2):3-24.
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  46. Why Computers Must Have Bodies in Order to Be Intelligent.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 21 (1):13-32.
    IN SEPTEMBER 1957, Herbert Simon, a pioneer in cognitive simulation, predicted that within ten years, i.e., by now, a computer would be world chess champion and would prove an important mathematical theorem. This prediction was based on Simon's early initial success in writing a program that could play legal chess and one able to prove simple theorems in logic and geometry. But the early successes turned out to be based on the solution of problems that were simple for machines, and (...)
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  47.  54
    Phenomenological Description Versus Rational Reconstruction.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2001 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 55 (216):181-196.
  48. Comments on Jonathan Lear’s Radical Hope.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (1):63-70.
    Cultural devastation, and the proper response to it, is the central concern of "Radical Hope". I address an uncertainty in Lear's book, reflected in a wavering over the difference between a culture's way of life becoming impossible and its way of life becoming unintelligible. At his best, Lear asks the radical ontological question: when the cultural collapse is such that the old way of life has become not only impossible but retroactively unimaginable,—when nothing one can do makes sense anymore,—how can (...)
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  49.  89
    On the Ordering of Things: Being and Power In Heidegger and Foucault.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1990 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 28 (Supplement):83-96.
  50.  21
    Introduction.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (2):5-6.
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