Order:
  1. One Kiss Too Many? Giving, Luck Egalitarianism and Other-Affecting Choice.Hugh Lazenby - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (3):271-286.
  2.  50
    Broome on Fairness and Lotteries.Hugh Lazenby - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (4):331-345.
    John Broome argues that when all claims cannot be perfectly fairly satisfied in outcome, the contribution to fairness from entering claims into a lottery, and so providing them some surrogate satisfaction, ought to be weighed against, and can outweigh, what fairness can be achieved directly in outcome. I argue that this is a mistake. Instead, I suggest that any contribution to fairness from entering claims into a lottery is lexically posterior to fairness in outcome.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  6
    Permissible Secrets.Hugh Lazenby & Iason Gabriel - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (271):265-285.
    This article offers an account of the information condition on morally valid consent in the context of sexual relations. The account is grounded in rights. It holds that a person has a sufficient amount of information to give morally valid consent if, and only if, she has all the information to which she has a claim-right. A person has a claim-right to a piece of information if, and only if, a. it concerns a deal-breaker for her; b. it does not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  47
    Hypothetical Insurance and Higher Education.Ben Colburn & Hugh Lazenby - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):587-604.
    What level of government subsidy of higher education is justified, in what form, and for what reasons? We answer these questions by applying the hypothetical insurance approach, originally developed by Ronald Dworkin in his work on distributive justice. On this approach, when asking how to fund and deliver public services in a particular domain, we should seek to model what would be the outcome of a hypothetical insurance market: we stipulate that participants lack knowledge about their specific resources and risks, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  34
    Is Age Special? Justice, Complete Lives and the Prudential Lifespan Account.Hugh Lazenby - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (4):327-340.
    This article explores the problem of justice between age-groups. Specifically, it presents a challenge to a leading theory in this field, Norman Daniels' Prudential Lifespan Account. The challenge relates to a key assumption that underlies this theory, namely the assumption that all individuals live complete lives of equal length. Having identified the roles that this assumption plays, the article argues that the justifications Daniels offers for it are unsatisfactory and that this threatens the foundation of his position, undermining his claim (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  50
    Luck, Risk and the Market.Hugh Lazenby - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):667-680.
    This paper explores how luck egalitarianism fares in capturing our intuitions about the fairness of market-generated outcomes. Critics of luck egalitarianism have argued that it places no restrictions on what outcomes are acceptable, at least when all agents are equally situated before entering the market, and that this gives us a reason to reject it as an account of fairness. I will argue that luck egalitarianism does make specific judgements about which market-generated outcomes are compatible with maintaining a fair distribution. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  21
    Bottlenecks: A New Theory of Equal Opportunity.Hugh Lazenby - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (264):649-652.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  15
    Mistakes and the Continuity Test.Hugh Lazenby - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (2):190-205.
    In a series of recent articles, Matthew Clayton, Andrew Williams and Rasmus Sommer Hansen and Soren Flinch Midtgaard argue that a key virtue of Ronald Dworkin’s account of distributive justice, Equality of Resources, is that it provides a distribution that is continuous with the evaluations of the individuals whom it ranges over. The idea of continuity, or as Williams calls it the ‘continuity test’, limits distributive claims in at least one important way: one person cannot claim compensation from another when (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  5
    Social Injustice: Essays in Political Philosophy.Hugh Lazenby - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (261):865-867.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography