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Hui-Chieh Loy
National University of Singapore
  1. War and Ghosts in Mozi's Political Philosophy.Benjamin Wong & Hui-Chieh Loy - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (3):343-363.
    : It is argued here that Mozi's critique of warfare in the chapter "Against Offensive War" ("Fei gong") cannot be fully understood without the arguments presented in the chapter "Explaining Ghosts" ("Ming gui"). For Mozi, the problem of war can only be resolved if the existence of providential ghosts can be proven. But he indicates in his arguments concerning the existence of ghosts that it is doubtful whether such a condition can be met. Consequently, despite the apparently optimistic tenor of (...)
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  2.  61
    Justification and Debate: Thoughts on Moist Moral Epistemology.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):455-471.
  3. Classical Confucianism as Virtue Ethics.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2014 - In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing.
  4.  60
    On the Argument for Jian’Ai.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):487-504.
    In all three versions of the “Jian’ai” 兼愛 Chapter in the Mozi 墨子, variations of a central argument may be found. This argument proceeds by advancing a diagnosis for what causes the various evils that beset the world, and it is on this basis that the Mohists propose jian’ai as the solution. The study examines this main argument in some detail, with the aim of improving both our understanding of the Mohist ethical doctrine and also our appreciation of their argumentative (...)
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  5.  9
    On the Argument for Jian’Ai.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):487-504.
    In all three versions of the “Jian’ai” 兼愛 Chapter in the Mozi 墨子, variations of a central argument may be found. This argument proceeds by advancing a diagnosis for what causes the various evils that beset the world, and it is on this basis that the Mohists propose jian’ai as the solution. The study examines this main argument in some detail, with the aim of improving both our understanding of the Mohist ethical doctrine and also our appreciation of their argumentative (...)
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  6.  10
    Comments on Siufu T ang ’s Self-Realization through Confucian Learning.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (1):133-137.
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  7.  53
    The Word and the Way in Mozi.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (10):652-662.
    According to A. C. Graham, ‘the crucial question’ for the early Chinese thinkers was ‘Where is the Way [dao]?’–‘the way to order the state and conduct personal life’ rather than ‘What is the Truth?’1 This observation is most apt when applied to the thinking of Mozi and his followers as it is exemplified in the ethical and political chapters of the eponymously named text .2 A striking feature of the Mohists’ thinking, however, is the concern they have with yan , (...)
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  8. Mozi (Mo-Tzu).Hui-Chieh Loy - 2007 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  9.  7
    Review of Van Norden, Bryan W., Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. [REVIEW]Hui-Chieh Loy - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):343-345.
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  10.  41
    The Mozi: A Complete Translation (Review).Hui-Chieh Loy - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):308-311.
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  11.  37
    What Has J. L. Austin to Do with Confucius?Hui-Chieh Loy - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):193-208.
    In the first chapter of Confucius: The Secular as Sacred, Herbert Fingarette argues that in the Analects Confucius holds the essence of human virtue to be a kind of magic power and this magic can be explained in terms of J. L. Austin’s analysis of the “performative utterance.” This paper attempts to explicate what Fingarette’s claims concerning magic and the “performative” amount to. I will argue that even though there is something to the underlying spirit of Fingarette’s project, he either (...)
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  12.  38
    Van Norden, Bryan W., Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):343-345.
  13.  7
    Thoughts About Lloyd's Multidimensionality of Reality.Hui-Chieh Loy - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (3):277-280.
    ABSTRACTThe response comments upon the idea of there being a multidimensionality to reality that G.E.R. Lloyd introduced in recent works. The idea is that while different equally intelligent perceivers might inhabit one and the same world, there can be a plurality of equally valid accounts. In putting forward the idea, Lloyd sought to strike a balance between ‘realism’ and ‘relativism.’ The response proposes two main points. First, the most interesting version of the thesis will have to be about how otherwise (...)
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  14.  18
    Review of Mengzi, Bryan W. Van Norden (Trans.), Mengzi: With Selections From Traditional Commentaries[REVIEW]Hui-chieh Loy - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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