Results for 'Human beings'

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Bibliography: Human Beings in Metaphysics
Bibliography: Human Beings, Misc in Metaphysics
  1.  33
    Nanotechnology – Steps Towards Understanding Human Beings as Technology?Armin Grunwald & Yannick Julliard - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):77-87.
    Far-reaching promises made by nanotechnology have raised the question of whether we are on the way to understanding human beings more and more as belonging to the realm of technology. In this paper, an increasing need to understand the technological re-conceptualization of human beings is diagnosed whenever increasingly “technical” interpretations of humans as mechanical entities are disseminated. And this can be observed at present in the framework of nanobiotechnology, a foremost “technical” self-description where a technical language (...)
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  2.  97
    Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism. [REVIEW]Weixiang Ding - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13-37.
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, “ ming 命 (destiny or decrees)” and “ tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)” mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from “ ling 令 (decrees),” which evolved from “ wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)” into “ tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees),” and then became “ ming ” from a throne because of the decisive role of “heavenly decrees” over a throne. “ Ming ” and (...)
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  3. Life and Death Matters: Losing a Sense of the Value of Human Beings.Christopher Cordner - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):207-226.
    The essay combines a specific and a more general theme. In attacking ‘the doctrine of the sanctity of human life’ Singer takes himself thereby to be opposing the conviction that human life has special value. I argue that this conviction goes deep in our lives in many ways that do not depend on what Singer identifies as central to that ‘doctrine’, and that his attack therefore misses its main target. I argue more generally that Singer’s own moral philosophy (...)
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  4.  24
    Destiny and Heavenly Ordinances: Two Perspectives on the Relationship Between Heaven and Human Beings in Confucianism.Ding Weixiang & Huang Deyuan - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):13 - 37.
    As a pair of important categories in traditional Chinese culture, "ming 命 (destiny or decrees)" and "tian ming 天命 (heavenly ordinances)" mainly refer to the constraints placed on human beings. Both originated from "ling 令 (decrees)," which evolved from "wang ling 王令 (royal decrees)" into "tian ling 天令 (heavenly decrees)," and then became "ming" from a throne because of the decisive role of "heavenly decrees" over a throne. "Ming" and "tian ming" have different definitions: "Ming" represented the limits (...)
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  5. Dante's Paradiso: No Human Beings Allowed.Bruce Silver - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):110-127.
    “But when you meet her again,” he observed, “in Heaven, you, too, will be changed. You will see her spiritualized, with spiritual eyes.”1Dante is not a philosopher, although George Santayana sees him as one among a very few philosophical poets.2 The Divine Comedy deals in terza rima with issues that are philosophically urgent, including the relation between reasoning well and happiness.3And as one of the few great epics in Western literature, the Comedy offers its readers the pleasures of world-class poetry, (...)
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  6.  5
    Secondary Reinforcement of a Simple Discrimination in Human Beings.Wilbur R. Hubbard - 1951 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (4):233.
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  7. The Philosophical Understanding of Human Beings: Papers by Czechoslovak Aut[H]Ors of the Main Theme of the Xviii. World Congres[S] of Philosophy.Jaroslav Pecen (ed.) - 1988 - Academia - Publishing House of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.
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  8.  25
    Life and Health: A Value in Itself for Human Beings?Helen Watt - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (3):207-228.
    The presence of a human being/organism—a living human ‘whole’, with the defining tendency to promote its own welfare—has value in itself, as do the functions which compose it. Life is inseparable from health, since without some degree of healthy functionality the living whole would not exist. The value of life differs both within a single life and between lives. As with any other form of human flourishing, the value of life-and-health must be distinguished from the moral importance (...)
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  9. Genetic Interventions and the Ethics of Enhancement of Human Beings.Julian Savulescu - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 516--535.
    There has been considerable recent debate on the ethics of human enhancement. A number of prominent authors have been concerned about or critical of the use of technology to alter or enhance human beings, citing threats to human nature and dignity as one basis for these concerns. Frances Kamm has given a detailed rebuttal of Sandel's arguments, arguing that human enhancement is permissible. Nicholas Agar, in his book Liberal Eugenics, argues that enhancement should be permissible (...)
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  10.  91
    Should Human Beings Have Sex? Sexual Dimorphism and Human Enhancement.Robert Sparrow - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):3-12.
    Since the first sex reassignment operations were performed, individual sex has come to be, to some extent at least, a technological artifact. The existence of sperm sorting technology, and of prenatal determination of fetal sex via ultrasound along with the option of termination, means that we now have the power to choose the sex of our children. An influential contemporary line of thought about medical ethics suggests that we should use technology to serve the welfare of individuals and to remove (...)
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  11.  15
    Animality and Rationality in Human Beings: Towards Enriching Contemporary Educational Studies.Koichiro Misawa - 2014 - Cosmos and History 10 (2):182-196.
    “What is the nature of the beings that we are?” is perhaps the most difficult question. The difficulty lies in our being a natural animal in a normative environment. In harmony with John McDowell’s conception of a naturalism of second nature, this paper claims that we should not rest satisfied with the predominant scientific picture in which the seeming rift between our animality and our rationality is to be resolved by detailed studies of empirically knowable facts about our animal (...)
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  12.  15
    Leibniz on Slavery and the Ownership of Human Beings.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (10):1–18.
    Leibniz puts forward an intriguing argument against the moral permissibility of chattel slavery in a text from 1703. This argument has three independent layers or sub-arguments. The first is that slavery violates natural rights. The second is that moral laws such as the principles of equity and piety oppose slavery, or at least severely limit the permissible actions toward slaves. The third and final layer is that slavery can at most be justified if the slave is permanently incapable of conducting (...)
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  13. Non-Social Human Beings in the Original Position.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2016 - Philosophical Pathways (205).
    This paper argues that Rawls must commit himself to non-social human beings to defend his original position procedure.
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  14. In What Sense Exactly Are Human Beings More Political According to Aristotle?Refik Güremen - 2018 - Filozofija I Društvo 29 (2):170-181.
    Abstract According to Aristotle, human beings are by nature political animals. It is now common knowledge that being political is not a human privilege for him: bees, wasps, ants and cranes are other political species. Although they are not the only political animals, human beings, for Aristotle, are still more political than the other political animals. The present article investigates the precise sense of this comparison; and it claims that the higher degree of human (...)
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  15.  44
    The Epigenesis of Meaning in Human Beings, and Possibly in Robots.Jordan Zlatev - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (2):155-195.
    This article addresses a classical question: Can a machine use language meaningfully and if so, how can this be achieved? The first part of the paper is mainly philosophical. Since meaning implies intentionality on the part of the language user, artificial systems which obviously lack intentionality will be `meaningless'. There is, however, no good reason to assume that intentionality is an exclusively biological property and thus a robot with bodily structures, interaction patterns and development similar to those of human (...)
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  16.  41
    On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By.Stein M. Wivestad - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition (...)
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  17.  40
    We Are Human Beings.Andrew McGee - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (2):148-171.
    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan’s arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has (...)
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  18.  29
    On the Complexity and Wholeness of Human Beings: Husserlian Perspectives.Sara Heinämaa - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 25 (3):393-406.
    At the beginning of Being and Time, Heidegger rejects Husserl’s classical phenomenology on three grounds: he claims that Husserlian phenomenology is impaired by indeterminate concepts, by naïve personalism, and by obscurities in its account of individuation. The paper studies the validity of this early critique by explicating Husserl’s discourse on human persons as bodily-spiritual beings and by clarifying his account of the principles by which such beings can be individuated. The paper offers three types of considerations. After (...)
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  19. Persons, Human Beings, and Respect.Peter Baumann - 2007 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):5-17.
    Human dignity seems very important to us. At the same time, the concept ‘human dignity’ is extrordinarily elusive. A good way to approach the questions “What is it?” and “Why is it important?” is to raise another question first: In virtue of what do human beings have dignity? Speciesism - the idea that human beings have a particular dignity because they are humans - does not seem very convincing. A better answer says that (...) beings have dignity because and insofar as they are persons. I discuss several versions of this idea as well as several objections against it. The most promising line of analysis says that human beings cannot survive psychologically without a very basic form of recognition and respect by others. The idea that humans have a very special dignity is the idea that they owe each other this kind of respect. All this also suggests that human dignity is inherently social. Non-social beings do not have dignity - nor do they lack it. It is because we are social animals of a certain kind that we have dignity - not so much because we are rational animals. (shrink)
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  20.  72
    On Parfit's View That We Are Not Human Beings.Eric T. Olson - 2015 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 76:39-56.
    Derek Parfit claims that we are not human beings. Rather, each of us is the part of a human being that thinks in the strictest sense. This is said to solve a number of difficult metaphysical problems. I argue that the view has metaphysical problems of its own, and is inconsistent with any psychological-continuity account of personal identity over time, including Parfit's own.
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  21.  31
    Aquinas on the Nature of Human Beings.Jason T. Eberl - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):333 - 365.
    IN THIS PAPER, I PROVIDE A FORMULATION of Thomas Aquinas’s account of the nature of human beings for the purpose of comparing it with other accounts in both the history of philosophy and contemporary analytic philosophy. I discuss how his apparently dualistic understanding of the relationship between soul and body yields the conclusion that a human being exists as a unified substance composed of a rational soul informing, that is, serving as the specific organizing principle of, a (...)
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  22.  66
    Are Human Beings Part of the Rest of Nature?Christopher Lang, Elliott Sober & Karen Strier - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):661-671.
    Unified explanations seek to situate the traits of human beings in a causal framework that also explains the trait values found in nonhuman species. Disunified explanations claim that the traits of human beings are due to causal processes not at work in the rest of nature. This paper outlines a methodology for testing hypotheses of these two types. Implications are drawn concerning evolutionary psychology, adaptationism, and anti-adaptationism.
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  23. Human Beings, Human Animals, and Mentalistic Survival.Denis Robinson - 2007 - In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics: Volume 3. Oxford University Press. pp. 3-32.
    I critically discuss both the particular doctrinal and general meta-philosophical or methodological tenets of Mark Johnston's paper "Human Beings", attending to several weaknesses in his argument. One of the most important amongst them is an apparent reliance on a substitution of identicals within an intensional context as he argues that continuity of functioning brain is essential to the persistence of "Human Beings" as allegedly singled out by his methodology; another equally important is a simple lacuna in (...)
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  24.  31
    Protecting Nature for the Sake of Human Beings.Simon P. James - 2016 - Ratio 29 (2):213-227.
    It is often assumed that to say that nature should be protected for the sake of human beings just is to say that it should be protected because it is a means to one or more anthropocentric ends. I argue that this assumption is false. In some contexts, claims that a particular natural X should be protected for our sakes mean that X should be protected, not because it is a means to anthropocentric ends, but because it is (...)
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  25.  40
    Are Human Beings Religious by Nature? Schleiermacher's Generic View of Religion and The Contemporary Pluralistic, Secular Culture.Wessel Stoker - 2000 - Bijdragen 61 (1):51-75.
    This article rejects the claim that human beings are religious by nature. This rejection is controversial. It is always said by catholic and protestant philosophers and theologians that human beings are religious by nature. Schleiermacher holds that the feeling of absolute dependence does not define religion, but it is the defining characteristic that makes a certain phenomenon a religiousone. This defining characteristic is borrowed from christian faith in the one God the creator. I raise two questions: (...)
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  26.  11
    Persons, Animals, and Human Beings.Harold W. Noonan - 2010 - In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry Silverstein (eds.), Time and Identity. MIT Press.
    This chapter discusses the suggestion that a psychological approach must be mistaken, because, in fact, the correct account of personal identity is given by the biological approach, according to which we are human beings whose identity over time requires no kind of psychological continuity or connectedness whatsoever. A number of authors support this suggestion, including Paul Snowdon, Peter van Inwagen, and Eric Olson. This also presumes that humans, i.e. members of the species Homo sapiens, are animals of a (...)
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  27. Aristotle on the Difference Between Plants, Animals, and Human Beings and on the Elements as Instruments of the Soul (De Anima 2.4.415b18). [REVIEW]Abraham P. Bos - 2010 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):821-841.
    Why do all animals possess sense perception while plants don’t? And should the difference in quality of life between human beings and wolves be explained by supposing that wolves have degenerated souls? This paper argues that for Aristotle differences in quality of life among living beings are based on differences in the quality of their soul-principle together with the body that receives the soul. The paper proposes a new interpretation of On the Soul 2.4.415b18: “For all the (...)
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  28.  60
    The Peculiar Function of Human Beings.Richard Kraut - 1979 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):467 - 478.
    The passage I will discuss in this paper, one of the best known in the Aristotelian corpus, occurs in Book I chapter 7 of the Nicomachean Ethics, and concerns the ergon, i.e. the function, of human beings. Aristotle argues that we have a function, that our happiness consists in fulfilling it, and that this function must be idion, i.e. it must be peculiar to us. On this basis, he asserts that our function cannot consist in being alive, nourishment, (...)
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  29. Human Beings and the Other Animals.Christine M. Korsgaard - unknown
    Human ethical practices and attitudes with respect to the other animals exhibit a curious instability. On the one hand, most people believe that it is wrong to inflict torment or death on a non-human animal for a trivial reason. Skinning a cat or setting it on fire by way of a juvenile prank is one of the standard examples of obvious wrongdoing in the philosophical literature. Like torturing infants, it is the kind of example that philosophers use when (...)
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  30.  11
    Human Beings and Robots: A Matter of Teleology?Andrea Lavazza - 2018 - Humana Mente 11 (34).
    In this paper, I use the comparison between human beings and intelligent machines to shed light on the concept of teleology. What characterizes human beings and distinguishes them from a robot capable of achieving complex objectives? In the first place, by stipulating that what characterizes human beings are mental states, I consider the mark of the mental. A smart robot probably has no consciousness but we might have reason for doubt while interacting with it. (...)
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  31. The Role of Human Beings in the Quantum Universe.Henry P. Stapp - 2009 - World Futures 65 (1):7 – 18.
    A profound change in our scientific understanding of the role of human beings in the unfolding of our streams of conscious experiences was wrought by the 20th-century switch from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics. The streams of consciousness thoughts of human beings were converted from causally inert passive witnesses of the unfolding of a mechanically controlled and causally self-sufficient physical universe into logically needed dynamical inputs into the physical aspects of nature. These physical aspects, as they (...)
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  32.  52
    The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner’s Philosophical Anthropology.Hans-Peter Krüger - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107-119.
    Abstract John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder needs a (...)
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  33.  60
    Understanding Objectification: Is There Special Wrongness Involved in Treating Human Beings Instrumentally?Evangelia Papadaki - 2012 - Prolegomena 11 (1):5-24.
    This article centres around objectification. It offers an analysis of the notions that are involved in this phenomenon, their moral wrongness, as well as the connections that exist between them. Martha Nussbaum has suggested that seven notions are involved in objectification: instrumentality, denial of autonomy, inertness, fungibility, violability, ownership, and denial of subjectivity. She espouses the view that the instrumentalisation of human beings is especially problematic as compared to the other ways in which we can treat human (...)
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  34.  17
    "They Were All Human Beings: So Much Is Plain": Reflections on Cultural Relativism in the Humanities.E. H. Gombrich - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (4):686-699.
    In the fourth section of Goethe’s Zahme Xenien we find the quatrain from which I have taken the theme of such an old and new controversy, which, as I hope, concerns both Germanic studies and the other humanities: “What was it that kept you from us so apart?” I always read Plutarch again and again. “And what was the lesson he did impart?” “They were all human beings—so much is plain.”1 In the very years when Goethe wrote these (...)
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  35.  45
    Human Beings and Giant Squids (on Ascribing Human Sensations and Emotions to Non-Human Creatures).David Cockburn - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (268):135-50.
    A television nature programme a year or two ago contained a striking sequence in which a giant squid was under threat from some other creature . The squid responded in a way which struck me immediately and powerfully as one of fear. Part of what was striking in this sequence was the way in which it was possible to see in the behaviour of a creature physically so very different from human beings an emotion which was so unambiguously (...)
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  36.  34
    On Hannah Arendt: The Worldly In-Between of Human Beings and its Ethical Consequences.Eveline Cioflec - 2012 - South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):646-663.
    In this paper, I show how a concept of ethics can be derived from Hannah Arendt’s theory of action in The Human Condition , which contains from her call for action. When she looks at the ‘political actor’, as well as at the concept of ‘political situation’, her ethical claim is first of all the need to take initiative, to act. Hence, ‘political situations’ as she defines them are discussed as common responsibilities. But common responsibility is rooted in the (...)
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  37.  10
    Using Drones to Study Human Beings: Ethical and Regulatory Issues.David B. Resnik & Kevin C. Elliott - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (3):707-718.
    Researchers have used drones to track wildlife populations, monitor forest fires, map glaciers, and measure air pollution but have only begun to consider how to use these unmanned aerial vehicles to study human beings. The potential use of drones to study public gatherings or other human activities raises novel issues of privacy, confidentiality, and consent, which this article explores in depth. It argues that drone research could fall into several different categories: non-human subjects research, exempt HSR, (...)
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  38.  45
    "Male Logic" and "Women's Intuition" The Split in Our Thinking Between "Masculine" and "Feminine" is Probably as Old as Language Itself. Human Beings Seem..Robin Turner - unknown
    The split in our thinking between "masculine" and "feminine" is probably as old as language itself. Human beings seem to have a natural tendency to divide things into pairs: good/bad, light/dark, subject/object and so on. It is not surprising, then, that the male/female or masculine/feminine dichotomy is used to classify things other than men and women. Many languages actually classify all nouns as "masculine" or "feminine" (although not very consistently: for example, the Spanish masculine noun pollo means "hen", (...)
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  39.  27
    Ethics Education in Research Involving Human Beings in Undergraduate Medicine Curriculum in Brazil.Maria Rita Garbi Novaes, Dirce Guilhem, Elena Barragan & Stewart Mennin - 2013 - Developing World Bioethics 13 (3):163-168.
    Introduction The Brazilian national curriculum guidelines for undergraduate medicine courses inspired and influenced the groundwork for knowledge acquisition, skills development and the perception of ethical values in the context of professional conduct. Objective The evaluation of ethics education in research involving human beings in undergraduate medicine curriculum in Brazil, both in courses with active learning processes and in those with traditional lecture learning methodologies. Methods Curricula and teaching projects of 175 Brazilian medical schools were analyzed using a retrospective (...)
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  40. The Second Nature of Human Beings: An Invitation for John McDowell to Discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology.Hans-Peter Kr - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):107 – 119.
    John McDowell argues for minimal empiricism via using the notion of second nature of human beings. I should like to invite him to discuss Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology in order to elaborate a more substantial conception of second nature. McDowell seems to think that it is adequate for his more epistemological aim to remind us of second nature as though it were to be taken for granted. But I think, following Plessner, that this right reminder needs a therapeutic (...)
     
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  41.  44
    The Perplexing Conclusion: The Essential Difference Between Natural and Artificial Intelligence is Human Beings' Ability to Deceive.Alexander Barzel - 1998 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):165–178.
    As opposed to the computer, the human being can intentionally mislead in many different ways, can behave chaotically, and whenever he has the motivation can choose also by improvisation, non‐consequent misleading, and spontaneous manners of reasoning and articulation. Human perception and the elaboration of the experience are existentially interest‐related, and distorted if found necessary. The arbitrariness is unlimited; human beings can initiate and produce absurd combinations, contextual failures and deceptive expressions, and do so also by intonation (...)
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  42. Human Beings and Automatons.Simo Säätelä - unknown
    J.S. Mill has formulated a classical statement of the "argument from analogy� concerning knowledge of other minds: "I must either believe them [other human beings] to be alive, or to be automatons� (Mill 1872, 244). It is possible that Wittgenstein had this in mind when writing the following: "I believe he is suffering.�—Do I also believe that he isn"t an automaton? It would go against the grain to use the word in both connexions. (Or is it like this: (...)
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  43.  11
    Beyond Formalism: Naming and Necessity for Human Beings.Stephen P. Schwartz & Jay F. Rosenberg - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):79.
    Beyond Formalism is Jay Rosenberg’s attempt to articulate his dissatisfactions with the Kripkean “revolution” in the philosophy of language and to propose an alternative to it. According to Rosenberg, even though a “surprisingly large number of philosophers simply adopted the Kripkean ideas, images, and idioms root and branch”, he has been “inarticulately irritated by Kripke’s views for almost twenty years”. Rosenberg claims that Kripke’s semantics for proper names and natural kind terms is a misguided attempt to apply results in formal (...)
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  44.  9
    Kant’s Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings[REVIEW]Lara Denis - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):491-493.
    The “impure” part of Kant’s ethics consists of material concerning empirical knowledge of human beings. Kant is well-known for his insistence that the supreme moral principle must be discovered through non-empirical consideration of such notions as morality and rational wills. What is less appreciated is that Kant recognized what his critics have always said: that a pure ethics for rational beings in general cannot provide adequate, practical guidance for human beings in particular, real-world situations. Nor (...)
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  45.  24
    The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality.Giovanni Felice Azzone - 2003 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  46.  20
    The Expertise of Human Beings and Depression.Michael J. Hyde - 2011 - Social Epistemology 25 (3):263 - 274.
    Depression is a debilitating condition, but it can also be an awakening: one that calls attention to what is termed dimensions of expertise that come with the spatial and temporal structure of human beings and that are necessary for offering some counter to the debilitating force of the condition. Expertise has a significant ontological status: it is directly associated with who we are as creatures who can hear and respond to the call of conscience, desire acknowledgment and have (...)
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  47.  18
    Unveiling the Past—Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One Another Again? A Response From Living in Northern Ireland: Comment on “Truth in Reconciliation” by Alphonso Lingis.Derick Wilson - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):333-335.
    Unveiling the Past—Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One Another Again? A Response From Living in Northern Ireland Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 333-335 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9334-y Authors Derick Wilson, University of Ulster, School of Education, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry, BT52 1SA UK Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
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    (Mis)Understanding Human Beings: Theory, Value, and Progress in Education Research.Karl Hostetler - 2010 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 46 (4):400-415.
    There is renewed interest in what can be called an experimentist approach to education research. The claim is that if researchers would focus on experiments and evidence-based policies and practices, irreversible progress in education can be achieved. This experimentist approach cannot provide the understanding of knowledge and human beings needed for meaningful progress in education. Lacking is adequate appreciation for the role of theory, particularly ethical and other philosophical theory. We especially need a theory of our human (...)
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  49.  5
    Henry Knowles Beecher, Jay Katz, and the Transformation of Research with Human Beings.Alexander Morgan Capron - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (1):55-77.
    The modern history of experimentation with human beings is notable for its ethical lacunae. In 1865, in his great work, An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine, Dr. Claude Bernard, the French physician who first established the use of the scientific method in medicine, echoed the earlier injunctions of physician-moralist Moses Maimonides in counseling his fellow physicians not to treat their patients solely as a means of advancing knowledge. Yet such cautions had no apparent effect on the (...)
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    Medical Experiments on Human Beings.B. Towers - 1981 - Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (1):19-23.
    Throughout the scientific age it has been increasingly realised that the path to knowledge is through carefully-controlled experimentation. Medicine must never, however, treat human beings as objects, or as the means to achieving increased knowledge. Ultimately the goal of human evolution will be served by the willing collaboration of members of society in the advancement of knowledge through carefully planned experimentation. As of now, however, many safeguards must be built into the system to ensure that no exploitation (...)
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