Results for 'Human body Judaism'

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  1. The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding.Mark Johnson - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _The Meaning of the Body_, Mark Johnson continues his pioneering work on the exciting connections between cognitive science, language, and meaning first begun in the classic _Metaphors We Live By_. Johnson uses recent research into infant psychology to show how the body generates meaning even before self-consciousness has fully developed. From there he turns to cognitive neuroscience to further explore the bodily origins of meaning, thought, and language and examines the many dimensions of meaning—including images, qualities, emotions, and (...)
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  2. Development of Preferences for the Human Body Shape in Infancy.Virginia Slaughter, Michelle Heron & Susan Sim - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):71-81.
    Two studies investigated the development of infants' visual preferences for the human body shape. In Study 1, infants of 12,15 and 18 months were tested in a standard preferential looking experiment, in which they were shown paired line drawings of typical and scrambled bodies. Results indicated that the 18-month-olds had a reliable preference for the scrambled body shapes over typical body shapes, while the younger infants did not show differential responding. In Study 2, 12- and 18-month-olds (...)
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  3.  58
    Is `Property' Necessary? On Owning the Human Body and its Parts.Alexandra George - 2004 - Res Publica 10 (1):15-42.
    Courts usually treat control over human bodies and body parts as a property issue and find that people do not have property rights in themselves. This contradicts the liberal philosophical principle that people should be able to perform any self-regarding actions that do not cause harm to others. The philosophical inconsistencies under pinning the legal treatment of body parts arguably stem from a misplaced judicial preoccupation with‘ property ’. A better approach would be to hold a policy (...)
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  4.  18
    Politics and the Human Body: Assault on Dignity.Jean Bethke Elshtain & J. Timothy Cloyd (eds.) - 1995 - Vanderbilt University Press.
    Who or what determines the right to die? Do advancing reproductive technologies change reproductive rights? What forces influence cultural standards of beauty? How do discipline, punishment, and torture reflect our attitudes about the human body? In this challenging new book, Jean Bethke Elshtain, a nationally recognized scholar in political science and philosophy, and J. Timothy Cloyd, a strong new voice in social and political science, have assembled a collection of thought-provoking essays on these issues written by some of (...)
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  5.  56
    The Story of the Body and the Story of the Person: Towards an Ethics of Representing Human Bodies and Body-Parts.Y. Michael Barilan - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):193-205.
    .Western culture has a few traditions of representing the human body – among them mortuary art, the freak show, the culture of the relics, renaissance art and pre-modern and modern anatomy. A historical analysis in the spirit of Norbert Elias is offered with regard to body – person relationship in anatomy. Modern anatomy is characterized by separating the story of the person from the story of the body, a strategy that is incompatible with the bio-psycho-social paradigm (...)
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  6. The Philosophical Concept of a Human Body.Douglas C. Long - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (July):321-337.
    I argue in this paper that philosophers have not clearly introduced the concept of a body in terms of which the problem of other minds and its solutions have been traditionally stated; that one can raise fatal objections to attempts to introduce this concept; and that the particular form of the problem of other minds which is stated in terms of the concept is confused and requires no solution. The concept of a "body" which may or may not (...)
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  7.  15
    Review of Jonathan CK Wells’s The Evolutionary Biology of Human Body Fatness: Thrift and Control. [REVIEW]Jack Baker - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (4):439-443.
  8.  47
    Thinking Descartes in Conjunction, with Merleau-Ponty: The Human Body, the Future, and Historicity.James Griffith - 2019 - Filozofia 2 (74):111-125.
    This article addresses a debate in Descartes scholarship over the mind-dependence or -independence of time by turning to Merleau-Ponty’s "Nature" and "The Visible and the Invisible." In doing so, it shows that both sides of the debate ignore that time for Descartes is a measure of duration in general. The consequences to remembering what time is are that the future is shown to be the invisible of an intertwining of past and future, and that historicity is the invisible of God.
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  9.  17
    Judaism and Human Rights in Contemporary Thought: A Bibliographical Survey.S. Daniel Breslauer - 1993 - Greenwood Press.
    The fifth chapter contains entries for works on contemporary Judaism and human rights. The volume concludes with author, title, and subject indexes.
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  10.  41
    Fragments for a History of the Human Body.Michel Feher, Ramona Naddaff & Nadia Tazi - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):276-278.
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  11.  61
    Human Enhancement’? It’s All About ‘Body Modification’! Why We Should Replace the Term ‘Human Enhancement’ with ‘Body Modification’.Stefanie Rembold - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):307-315.
    The current use of the term ‘Human Enhancement’ implies that it is a modern, new phenomenon in which, for the first time in history, humans are able to break through their god or nature-given bodily limits thanks to the application of new technologies. The debate about the legitimation of ‘HE’, the selection of methods permitted, and the scope and purpose of these modern enhancement technologies has been dominated by ethical considerations, and has highlighted problems with the definition of the (...)
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  12. The Human Body as Material Subject of the World.Samuel Todes - 1990 - Garland.
  13.  36
    The Human Body and the Law.David W. Meyers - 1990 - Stanford University Press.
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  14.  9
    The Human Body as Stimulus Object: Estimates of Distances Between Body Landmarks.Franklin C. Shontz & Ronald D. McNish - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):20.
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  15.  18
    The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study.David W. Meyers - 2006 - Aldine Transaction.
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
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  16. Ownership of the Human Body Philosophical Considerations on the Use of the Human Body and its Parts in Healthcare.H. ten Have, Jos V. M. Welie & Stuart F. Spicker - 1998
     
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  17. On the Concept of the Human Body in Heraclitus.Shawn Loht - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Southeast Philosophy Congress.
    Explores how the fragments of Heraclitus might yield an implicit understanding of the human body in distinction to the soul. In the history of scholarship on Heraclitus, soul is a much better understood concept, whereas it is normally assumed that Heraclitus, along with other figures of early Greek thought, shows only the most limited comprehension of the human being in terms of bodily form or substance. In this work I sketch some different ways in which Heraclitus’ accounts (...)
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  18.  27
    Fichte on the Human Body as an Instrument of Perception.Kienhow Goh - 2015 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (1):37-56.
    This paper considers what Fichte's conception of the human body as an instrument of perception entails for his radical principle of the primacy of practice. According to Fichte, perception is a function of what he calls the "articulation" of the human body, as opposed to its "organization." I first provide an interpretation of his theory of the human-bodily articulation by arguing that he construes it as a product of culture as well as nature. On this (...)
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  19.  24
    Effect of Human Body Position on the Swimming Behavior of Bull Sharks, Carcharhinus Leucas.Raid Amin & Erich Ritter - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (3):225-235.
    This study tested whether human body orientation can influence the behavior of bull sharks by examining sharks’ approach distances from a person positioned vertically or horizontally in the water. Results showed that bull sharks, Carcharhinus leucas, kept a significantly greater distance when the test subject was standing in chest-deep water with his head above water versus lying on the ocean floor. Furthermore, larger bull sharks in the immediate area withdrew when the subject entered the water.
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  20. Enosh Ke-Ḥatsir: ʻal Ha-Adam: Guf Ṿe-Nefesh, Regesh, Śekhel Ṿe-Ratson.Mikhaʼ Avraham & el - 2007 - Hotsaʼat Tam.
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  21. Enosh Ke-Ḥatsir: ʻal Ha-Adam: Guf Ṿe-Nefesh, Regesh, Śekhel Ṿe-Ratson.Mikhaʼel Avraham - 2007 - Hotsaʼat Tam.
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  22. Ḳabalah la-Guf Ṿela-Neshamah: Ha-Guf Be-Filosofyah, Be-Madaʻ Uve-Ḳabalah: Hashlakhot Musariyot.Gil-Avraham Morali - 2012 - Ḥ. Mo. L..
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  23. Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade.Stephen Wilkinson - 2003 - Routledge.
    _Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade _explores the philosophical and practical issues raised by activities such as surrogacy and organ trafficking. Stephen Wilkinson asks what is it that makes some commercial uses of the body controversial, whether the arguments against commercial exploitation stand up, and whether legislation outlawing such practices is really justified. In Part One Wilkinson explains and analyses some of the notoriously slippery concepts used in the body commodification debate, (...)
  24.  3
    Bioethics and Environmental Ethics: The Story of the Human Body as a Natural Ecosystem.Zoe-Athena Papalois & Kyriaki-Barbara Papalois - 2020 - The New Bioethics 26 (2):91-97.
    Is there a parallel between climate change and our body’s temperature or non-compliance and failure to act on global warming? This paper proposes a model which describes the human body as part of N...
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  25.  40
    Genes and Spleens: Property, Contract, or Privacy Rights in the Human Body?Radhika Rao - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):371-382.
    This article compares three frameworks for legal regulation of the human body. Property law systematically favors those who use the body to create commercial products. Yet contract and privacy rights cannot compete with the property paradigm, which alone affords a complete bundle of rights enforceable against the whole world. In the face of researchers' property rights, the theoretical freedom to contract and the meager interest in privacy leave those who supply body parts vulnerable to exploitation.
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  26. Bodily Systems and the Spatial-Functional Structure of the Human Body.Barry Smith - 2004 - Studies in Health and Technology Informatics 102:39–63.
    The human body is a system made of systems. The body is divided into bodily systems proper, such as the endocrine and circulatory systems, which are subdivided into many sub-systems at a variety of levels, whereby all systems and subsystems engage in massive causal interaction with each other and with their surrounding environments. Here we offer an explicit definition of bodily system and provide a framework for understanding their causal interactions. Medical sciences provide at best informal accounts (...)
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  27. The "Spare Parts Person"? Conceptions of the Human Body and Their Implications for Public Attitudes Towards Organ Donation and Organ Sale.Mark Schweda & Silke Schicktanz - 2009 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4:4-.
    BackgroundThe increasing debate on financial incentives for organ donation raises concerns about a "commodification of the human body". Philosophical-ethical stances on this development depend on assumptions concerning the body and how people think about it. In our qualitative empirical study we analyze public attitudes towards organ donation in their specific relation to conceptions of the human body in four European countries (Cyprus, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden). This approach aims at a more context-sensitive picture of (...)
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  28.  11
    Leaving Gift-Giving Behind: The Ethical Status of the Human Body and Transplant Medicine.Paweł Łuków - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (2):221-230.
    The paper argues that the idea of gift-giving and its associated imagery, which has been founding the ethics of organ transplants since the time of the first successful transplants, should be abandoned because it cannot effectively block arguments for markets in human body parts. The imagery suggests that human bodies or their parts are transferable objects which belong to individuals. Such imagery is, however, neither a self-evident nor anthropologically unproblematic construal of the relation between a human (...)
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  29.  28
    Antoine Le Grand on the Identity Over Time of the Human Body.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1084-1109.
    ABSTRACTThis paper studies Antoine Le Grand's account of organic identity over time in human bodies. In response to Aristotelian critics who argued that the Cartesian rejection of the Aristotelian ontology of matter and form had put in jeopardy the diachronic identity of material substances in general and of living bodies in particular, Le Grand argued that the identity over time of the human body could be accounted for without the traditional notions of matter and form. The paper (...)
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  30. Bodily Systems and the Modular Structure of the Human Body.Barry Smith, Igor Papakin & Katherine Munn - 2003 - Artificial Intelligence in Medicine (Lecture Notes on Artificial Intelligence 2780) 9:86-90.
    Medical science conceives the human body as a system comprised of many subsystems at a variety of levels. At the highest level are bodily systems proper, such as the endocrine system, which are central to our understanding of human anatomy, and play a key role in diagnosis and in dynamic modeling as well as in medical pedagogy and computer visualization. But there is no explicit definition of what a bodily system is; such informality is acceptable in documentation (...)
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  31.  30
    Notes From Narnia (on the Human Body).Samuel Baker - 2019 - Think 18 (52):81-86.
    What is a human body? Some reasons are given for thinking that, in the primary case, it is a body that is both of and suitable to a rational animal.
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  32.  37
    Why the Way We Consider the Body Matters – Reflections on Four Bioethical Perspectives on the Human Body.Silke Schicktanz - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:30.
    Within the context of applied bioethical reasoning, various conceptions of the human body are focused upon by the author in relation to normative notions of autonomy.
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  33.  89
    The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato’s Timaeus.Filip Karfík - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The (...)
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  34.  53
    Normative Aspects of the Human Body.Ludwig Siep - 2003 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (2):171 – 185.
    In cultural history the human body has been the object of a great variety of opposing valuations, ranging from "imago dei" to "the devil's tool". At present, the body is commonly regarded as a mere means to fulfill the wishes of its "owner". According to these wishes it can be technically improved in an unlimited way. Against this view the text argues for a conception of the human body as a valuable "common heritage". The "normal" (...)
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  35.  9
    Integrating Perspectives on Human Body Perception.Giinther Knoblich, Ian Thornton, Marc Grosjean & Maggie Shiffrar - 2006 - In Günther Knoblich, Ian M. Thornton, Marc Grosjean & Maggie Shiffrar (eds.), Human Body Perception From the Inside Out. Oxford University Press.
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  36.  50
    The Commerce of Human Body Parts: An Eastern Orthodox Response.P. H. Reardon - 2000 - Christian Bioethics 6 (2):205-213.
    The Orthodox Church teaches that the bodies of those in Christ are to be regarded as sanctified by the hearing of the Word and faithful participation in the Sacraments, most particularly the Holy Eucharist; because of the indwelling Holy Spirit the consecrated bodies of Christians do not belong to them but to Christ; with respect to the indwelling Holy Spirit there is no difference between the bodies of Christians before and after death; whether before or after death, the Christian (...) is also to receive the same veneration; and notwithstanding the physical corruptions that the body endures by reason of death, there remains a strict continuity between the body in which the Christian dies and the body in which the Christian will rise again. That is to say, it is the very same reality that is sown in corruption and will be raised in incorruption. Given such considerations, the notion of “selling” an integral part of a human being is simply outside the realm of rational comprehension. Indeed, it is profoundly repugnant to those Orthodox Christian sentiments that are formed and nourished by the Church's sacramental teaching and liturgical worship. One does not sell or purchase that which has been consecrated in those solemn ways that the Church consecrates the human body. (shrink)
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  37.  69
    The Human Body as Field of Conflict Between Discourses.Gerrit K. Kimsma & Evert van Leeuwen - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):559-574.
    The approach to AIDS as a disease and a threat for social discrimination is used as an example to illustrate a conceptual thesis. This thesis is a claim that concerns what we call a medical issue or not, what is medicalised or needs to be demedicalised. In the friction between medicalisation and demedicalisation as discursive strategies the latter approach can only be effected through the employment of discourses or discursive strategies other than medicine, such as those of the law and (...)
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  38.  54
    The Right to Trade in Human Body Parts.Hillel Steiner - 2002 - In Jonathan Seglow (ed.), Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. F. Cass Publishers. pp. 187-193.
    This essay challenges the coherence of arguments brought in support of prohibiting the sale of human body parts. Considerations of neither social utility nor individual rights nor avoidance of exploitation seem sufficient to ground such a prohibition. Indeed, they may be sufficient to invalidate it.
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  39.  45
    On the Human Body in Igor Kiss's Humanized Deontology.V. Gluchman - 2012 - Christian Bioethics 18 (3):312-324.
    The basis for the analysis is the approach of Christian ethics toward the issue of the human body and sexuality. Based on the views of some present-day Christian, especially Protestant, ethicists, the author points out the effort to establish this area in contemporary Christian theology and ethics, which is, for instance, represented by the theology of sexuality and Christian sexual ethics. Consequently, the author pays attention to the opinions of the significant Slovak Lutheran theologian and ethicist Igor Kišš (...)
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  40.  14
    Biology and rationality. The distinctive character of the human body[REVIEW]Martin Montoya - forthcoming - Scientia et Fides.
    Which are the distinctive parts of the human body that help us to identify it as a physical element diverse from the rest of the world? Are they simply functional elements, or do they refer to another dimension that goes beyond instrumentality? These are the questions posed in the book “Biology and Rationality: The Distinctive Character of the Human Body” by José Ángel Lombo and José Manuel Giménez Amaya.From a philosophical point of view, the authors seek (...)
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  41.  6
    Archeticture: Ecstasies of Space, Time, and the Human Body[REVIEW]Chris Field - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):175-175.
    In the spirit of philosophy as the synthesis of wisdom, David Farrell Krell offers a novel bridge between the proper disciplines of philosophy and architecture. His result examines the term “architecture” as one which finds its basis in the Greek root “tic,” which broadens the use of the root tec to suggest not merely a making or producing, but a reproducing or procreating. Krell employs a spectrum of philosophers from Plato to Derrida to position architecture as more than just an (...)
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  42.  31
    Intellectual Property Rights and Detached Human Body Parts.Justine Pila - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):27-32.
    This paper responds to an invitation by the editors to consider whether the intellectual property regime suggests an appropriate model for protecting interests in detached human body parts. It begins by outlining the extent of existing IP protection for body parts in Europe, and the relevant strengths and weaknesses of the patent system in that regard. It then considers two further species of IP right of less obvious relevance. The first are the statutory rights of ownership conferred (...)
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  43.  14
    Dimensions of Corporeality. A Metatheoretical Analysis of Anthropologists 'Concern with the Human Body'.Jacek Bielas & Rafał Abramciów - 2009 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (1):133-143.
    Since the very dawn of its history, modern philosophical anthropology has been addressing the issue of the human body. As a result of those efforts, Descartes, de Biran, Husserl, Sartre, Marcel, Merleau-Ponty and others have brought forward a variety of conceptions concerning various aspects of human corporeality. Anthropological explorations concerning the question of the human body, appear in a particularly interesting way, when they are considered in the context of those points of view which, in (...)
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  44.  20
    The Human Body Sword.Kris Borer - 2010 - Libertarian Papers 2:20.
    The human body shield problem involves an apparent dilemma for a libertarian, forcing him to choose between his own death and the death of an innocent person. This paper argues that the non-aggression principle permits a forceful response against the property of innocent individuals when a conflict is initiated with that property. In other words, a libertarian may shoot the hostage in order to save himself.
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  45.  7
    The Human Body as Field of Conflict Between Discourses.Gerrit K. Kimsma & Evert van Leeuwen - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):559-574.
    The approach to AIDS as a disease and a threat for social discrimination is used as an example to illustrate a conceptual thesis. This thesis is a claim that concerns what we call a medical issue or not, what is medicalised or needs to be demedicalised. In the friction between medicalisation and demedicalisation as discursive strategies the latter approach can only be effected through the employment of discourses or discursive strategies other than medicine, such as those of the law and (...)
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  46.  7
    The Human Body and the Humility of Christian Ethics: An Encounter with Avant-Garde Theatre.Joshua Daniel - 2014 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 34 (1):189-210.
    This essay proposes two examples of avant-garde theatre, Jerzy Grotowski's poor theatre and Augusto Boal's theatre of the oppressed, as resources for Christian ethics. Both pursue theater as bodily copresent interaction whose moral labor is the liberation of the human body from conventional gestures for the sake of authentic encounter and from oppressive postures for the sake of social intervention. Focusing on the body in this way reveals that the place of narrative, while essential to Christian ethics, (...)
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  47.  11
    The Struggle Between Two World Views on the Understanding of the Human Body.Chin Wei - 1976 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 8 (1):36-56.
    With the appearance of mankind, the history of mankind's understanding of the human body itself also began. This long process of development rang with the struggle of two world views. The history of the development of man's understanding of the structure and functions of the human body is the history of the unbroken triumph of materialism over idealism, of the dialectical over the metaphysical. This essay simply takes a preliminary look back at this struggle from several (...)
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  48. This Mortal Coil: The Human Body in History and Culture.Fay Bound Alberti - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    The story of the body. Fay Bound Alberti takes the human body apart in order to put it back anew, telling the cultural history of our key organs and systems from the inside out, from blood to guts, brains to sex organs.
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  49.  27
    Tool Use Induces Complex and Flexible Plasticity of Human Body Representations.Matthew R. Longo & Andrea Serino - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):229 - 230.
    Plasticity of body representation fundamentally underpins human tool use. Recent studies have demonstrated remarkably complex plasticity of body representation in humans, showing that such plasticity (1) occurs flexibly across multiple time scales and (2) involves multiple body representations responding differently to tool use. Such findings reveal remarkable sophistication of body plasticity in humans, suggesting that Vaesen may overestimate the similarity of such mechanisms in humans and non-human primates.
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  50.  8
    Why Does It Matter How We Regulate the Use of Human Body Parts?Imogen Goold - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):3-9.
    Human tissue and body parts have been used in one way or another for millennia. They have been preserved and displayed, both in museums and public shows. Real human hair is used for wigs, while some artists even use human tissue in their works. Blood, bone marrow, whole organs and a host of other structures and human substances are all transplanted into living persons to treat illness. New life can be created from gametes through in (...)
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