Search results for 'Humanism Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    Fokke Akkerman, Gerda C. Huisman & Arie Johan Vanderjagt (eds.) (1993). Wessel Gansfort (1419-1489) and Northern Humanism. E.J. Brill.
    These nineteen original studies deal with Wessel Gansfort (1419-1489), the Modern Devotion and its influence, subjects and personalities of early humanism and ...
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  2. Keith Robbins (ed.) (1981). Religion and Humanism: Papers Read at the Eighteenth Summer Meeting and the Nineteenth Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society. Published for the Ecclesiastical History Society by Basil Blackwell.
  3. A. B. M. Mafizul Islam Patwari (ed.) (1992). Humanism and Human Rights in the Third World. Distributors, Aligarh Library.
     
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  4. Peter Sharratt (ed.) (1976). French Renaissance Studies, 1540-70: Humanism and the Encyclopedia. Edinburgh University Press.
  5. Tove Pettersen (2015). Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics. In Tove Pettersen Annlaug Bjørsnøs (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir – A Humanist Thinker. Brill/Rodopi. pp. 69-91.
    In "Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics" Tove Pettersen elucidates the close connection between Beauvoir’s ethics and humanism, and argues that her humanism is an existential humanism. Beauvoir’s concept of freedom is inspected, followed by a discussion of her reasons for making moral freedom the leading normative value, and her claim that we must act for humanity. In Beauvoir’s ethics, freedom is not reserved for the elite, but understood as everyone being “able (...)
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  6.  8
    James A. Metzger (2016). Humanism, Illness, and Elective Death: A Case Study in Utilitarian Ethics. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (1):21-58.
    The author offers a defense for elective death on utilitarian grounds, but one that is presented specifically from the perspective of someone who: 1) faces a potentially terminal illness and diminishing quality of life; 2) views death as nothing more than a return to prenatal nonbeing; and 3) maintains common humanist ethical commitments. The argument, then, is uniquely situated and limited in scope, rooted both in the particulars of his recent experience with a rheumatic autoimmune illness and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma as (...)
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  7.  26
    Katja Siepmann & McIntosh (2016). The Age of Transhumanism Has Begun: Will It Bring Humanism to Its End? Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 23 (2):133-15.
    This interview with Roland Benedikter, the European scholar of technology futures and politics, discusses the emergence of biological and computing technologies for transforming humanity. In this wide-ranging discussion, Benedikter discusses many ethical, social, and political implications to the application of these enhancing technologies and their coming political implications. Transhumanism, according to Benedikter, will represent both a powerful social ideology and a serious political agenda. How will humanism respond?
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  8. Massimo Pigliucci (2004). Secular Humanism and Politics: An Unapologetically Liberal Perspective. In B. F. Seidman & N. J. Murphy (eds.), Toward a New Political Humanism. Prometheus.
    An exploration of the relationship between secular humanism and politics, from a liberal perspective.
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  9.  2
    Tibor Solymosi (2016). Reconstructing Photohumanism: Pluralistic Humanism, Democracy, and the Anthropocene. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):115-134.
    Roy Scranton argues for a new philosophical humanism as the best response to the existential crisis of the Anthropocene, the new geological epoch for which human industrial activity is responsible. This threat from climate change, Scranton argues, is better met through what he calls photohumanism than by science, technology, engineering, and mathematics alone. This new humanism shares many affinities with pluralistic humanism. A key concern is political action, which is problematized by what Tschaepe calls dopamine democracy. Scranton (...)
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  10.  1
    Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  11.  9
    Tibor Solymosi (2015). Pluralistic Humanism: Democracy and the Religious. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 23 (1):25-43.
    I propose we discuss pluralistic humanism as an alternative to both atheism and traditional theism in an effort to establish a democratic faith to which we, despite our differences, can bind ourselves. I draw on the thought of American pragmatists to articulate a constructive criticism of new atheists. This criticism primarily focuses on the unacknowledged affinities between religion and scientific atheism – namely, a naive realism and a conversion experience – with the hope of using such common ground as (...)
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  12.  20
    Mark Tschaepe (2014). A Humanist Ethic of Ubuntu: Understanding Moral Obligation and Community. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 21 (2):47-61.
    The secular conception of ubuntu, as proffered by Thaddeus Metz, supplies a foundation for a humanist argument that justifies obligation to one’s community, even apart from a South African context, when combined with Kwasi Wiredu’s conception of personhood. Such an account provides an argument for accepting the concept of ubuntu as humanistic and not necessarily based in communalism or dependent upon supernaturalism. By re-evaluating some core concepts of community as they are presented in Plato’s Republic, I argue that this account (...)
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  13.  7
    D. L. LeMahieu (2015). An Awkward Quarrel: The Defense of Humanism in 1970s Britain. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 23 (1):1-24.
    In the 1970s, student radicals, left-wing academic theorists and second-wave feminists challenged the relevance and social neutrality of humanistic study. Yet for all its tentativeness and studied modesty, humanism proved more powerful and aggressive than its critics realized. In their willingness to critique both their own limitations and those of their adversaries, humanists sometimes contributed to the deterioration of institutions and values that they most sought to protect. The reputation of universities as impartial and even hallowed places of learning (...)
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  14.  14
    John R. Shook (2014). Paul Kurtz, Atheology, and Secular Humanism. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 21 (2):111-116.
    Paul Kurtz will be long remembered as the late twentieth century’s pre-eminent philosophical defender of freethinking rationalism and skepticism, the scientific worldview to replace superstition and religion, the healthy ethics of humanism, and democracy’s foundation in secularism. Reason, science, ethics, and civics – Kurtz repeatedly cycled through these affirmative agendas, not only to relegate religion to humanity’s ignorant past, but mainly to indicate the direction of humanity’s better future.
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  15.  8
    Frank Friedlander (2014). Emotions and Rationality as a Basis for Humanism: Can Humanism Encompass Both Intellect and Spirit? Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 21 (2):117-124.
    Two primary philosophical underpinnings of humanism are rationality and emotionality. Rationality along with a focus on reason, logic, and an empirical brand of science fortifies our skepticism toward belief in God, and promotes our theories of evolution. Emotionality provides the deeper feelings and compassion we have for one another. These two, rationality and emotionality, are symbolized by the head and heart of ourselves as individuals. They also, to varying degrees, underlay the religions and institutions of which we are a (...)
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  16.  8
    Joseph J. Locascio (2014). A Born Again Humanist. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 22 (1):109-118.
    This essay describes the somewhat unusual circumstances that precipitated the author’s transition from belief in traditional religion to adopting Humanism as a philosophy of life. Included are personal perspectives contrasting Humanistic philosophy with theistic religious faith.
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  17.  2
    Alistair J. Sinclair (2012). Henry Ford: The Visionary Humanist. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 20 (2):81-103.
    This paper contains an outlined portrait of Henry Ford, warts and all, a summary of his ‘humane capitalism’, the importance of which has been largely forgotten nowadays, and a suggestion of its relevance to today’s economic problems. Ford’s importance as a humanist becomes obvious when his view of capitalism is compared with that of his predecessor, Andrew Carnegie. Ford reacted implicitly against Carnegie’s draconian capitalism in which poverty was seen as an unavoidable necessity. In Carnegie’s view, wages could be lowered (...)
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  18. Jeroen Vanheste (2016). Poems of Man: Thomas Mann’s Ideas About a New Humanism. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):149-166.
    The questions ‘What is man?’ and ‘What is Europe?’ were among the main interests of Thomas Mann. In dozens of his essays and speeches as well as in some of his major novels Mann searched for the essence of European culture. In this paper we discuss Mann’s ideas about humanism, which he considered to be the core of the European identity. In both Mann’s novels and his essays he investigates the opposition between Enlightenment values and Romantic thinking. Mann believed (...)
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  19. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  20. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  21. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  22. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  23. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  24. Frieder Otto Wolf & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  25. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  26. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  27. Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn (2016). Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This (...) compels resort to other criteria than nature, such as those logical, emotive, cultural, in order to gauge the acceptability of value claims. The practical efforts to humanize society and widen human horizons requires engagement in public policy debates and social organizing and programming on consensus issues. Accordingly, the HVD works on such diverse issues as strengthening the rights to bodily integrity and sexual autonomy, preventing economic collapse, accommodating immigrants, protecting personal privacy, limiting the use of military force, building intra- and international peace, and exposing anti-humanist prejudice. (shrink)
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  28. Pablo Gilabert (2011). Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. Political Theory 39 (4):439-467.
    This essay explores the relation between two perspectives on the nature of human rights. According to the "political" or "practical" perspective, human rights are claims that individuals have against certain institutional structures, in particular modern states, in virtue of interests they have in contexts that include them. According to the more traditional "humanist" or "naturalistic" perspective, human rights are pre-institutional claims that individuals have against all other individuals in virtue of interests characteristic of their common humanity. This essay argues that (...)
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  29. Tony Davies (2008). Humanism. Routledge.
    Humanism offers students a clear and lucid introductory guide to the complexities of Humanism, one of the most contentious and divisive of artistic or literary concepts. Showing how the concept has evolved since the Renaissance period, Davies discusses humanism in the context of the rise of Fascism, the onset of World War II, the Holocaust, and their aftermath. Humanism provides basic definitions and concepts, a critique of the religion of humanity, and necessary background on religious, sexual (...)
     
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  30. David E. Klemm (2008). Religion and the Human Future: An Essay on Theological Humanism. Blackwell.
    The shape of theological humanism -- Ideas and challenges -- The humanist imagination -- Thinking of God -- The logic of Christian humanism -- On the integrity of life -- The task of theological humanism -- Our endangered garden -- A school of conscience -- Masks of mind -- Religion and spiritual integrity -- Living theological humanism.
     
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  31. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). Spinoza's Anti-Humanism. In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese.
    A common perception of Spinoza casts him as one of the precursors, perhaps even founders, of modern humanism and Enlightenment thought. Given that in the twentieth century, humanism was commonly associated with the ideology of secularism and the politics of liberal democracies, and that Spinoza has been taken as voicing a “message of secularity” and as having provided “the psychology and ethics of a democratic soul” and “the decisive impulse to… modern republicanism which takes it bearings by the (...)
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  32.  50
    Michael A. Pirson & Paul R. Lawrence (2010). Humanism in Business – Towards a Paradigm Shift? Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):553-565.
    Management theory and practice are facing unprecedented challenges. The lack of sustainability, the increasing inequity, and the continuous decline in societal trust pose a threat to ‘business as usual’. Capitalism is at a crossroad and scholars, practitioners, and policy makers are called to rethink business strategy in light of major external changes. In the following, we review an alternative view of human beings that is based on a renewed Darwinian theory developed by Lawrence and Nohria. We label this alternative view (...)
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  33.  91
    Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its emphasis on freedom of choice, (...)
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  34.  10
    Stefanos Geroulanos (2010). An Atheism That is Not Humanist Emerges in French Thought. Stanford University Press.
    This book seeks to explain the critiques of humanism and the "negative" philosophical anthropologies that dominated mid-century philosophy and traces the ...
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  35.  9
    Emmanuel Levinas & Nidra Poller (2003). Humanism of the Other. University of Illinois Press.
    'Humanism of the Other' argues that it is not only possible but of the highest exigency to understand one's humanity through the humanity of others.".
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  36. Serge Grigoriev (2011). Rorty, Religion, and Humanism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (3):187-201.
    This article offers a review of Richard Rorty’s attempts to come to terms with the role of religion in our public and intellectual life by tracing the key developments in his position, partially in response to the ubiquitous criticisms of his distinction between private and public projects. Since Rorty rejects the possibility of dismissing religion on purely epistemic grounds, he is determined to treat it, instead, as a matter of politics. My suggestion is that, in this respect, Rorty’s position is (...)
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  37.  11
    Charles Bingham (2016). Against Educational Humanism: Rethinking Spectatorship in Dewey and Freire. Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (2):181-193.
    In this essay, I investigate the human act of spectatorship as found in the work of John Dewey and Paulo Freire. I will show that each is thoroughly anti-watching when it comes to educational practices. I then problematize their positions by looking at their spectatorial commitments in the realm of aesthetics. Both Dewey and Freire have a different opinion about spectatorship when it is a matter of watching art. I claim that this different in opinion derives from the practice of (...)
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  38.  49
    David W. Ehrenfeld (1978). The Arrogance of Humanism. Oxford University Press.
    Attacks nothing less than the currently prevailing worldphilosophy--humanism, which the author feels is exceedingly dangerous in itshidden assumptions.
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  39. David Sztybel (2000). Taking Humanism Seriously: ``Obligatory'' Anthropocentrism. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (3-4):181-203.
    Humanism – in the sense that humans alonehave moral standing, or else a surpassing degree of it– has traditionally dominated all of ethicaldiscourse. However, its past formulations havesuccumbed to the temptation merely to stipulate sucha criterion, such as rationality, which nonhumans areoften deemed (without sufficient argument) to failwithout exception. Animal liberationistarguments do exist in counterpoint to traditionalhumanism, but one current difficulty seems to be asimple clash of basic assumptions, with an indecisiveresult. Although the author of this paper is anonanthropocentrist, (...)
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  40.  13
    Jeffrey P. Bishop (2008). Rejecting Medical Humanism: Medical Humanities and the Metaphysics of Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):15-25.
    The call for a narrative medicine has been touted as the cure-all for an increasingly mechanical medicine. It has been claimed that the humanities might create more empathic, reflective, professional and trustworthy doctors. In other words, we can once again humanise medicine through the addition of humanities. In this essay, I explore how the humanities, particularly narrative medicine, appeals to the metaphysical commitments of the medical institution in order to find its justification, and in so doing, perpetuates a dualism of (...)
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  41.  26
    Lodi Nauta (2009). In Defense of Common Sense: Lorenzo Valla's Humanist Critique of Scholastic Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    Introduction -- The attack on aristotelian-scholastic metaphysics -- The analysis of things : substance, quality, and the tree of porphyry -- Thing and word : a critique of transcendental terms -- From a grammatical point of view : the reduction of the categories -- Soul, nature, morality, and God -- Soul and nature : a critique of aristotelian psychology and natural philosophy -- The virtues and the road to heavenly pleasure -- Speaking about the ineffable : the Trinity -- Towards (...)
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  42.  22
    Sadjad Soltanzadeh (2015). Humanist and Nonhumanist Aspects of Technologies as Problem Solving Physical Instruments. Philosophy and Technology 28 (1):139-156.
    A form of metaphysical humanism in the field of philosophy of technology can be defined as the claim that besides technologies’ physical aspects, purely human attributes are sufficient to conceptualize technologies. Metaphysical nonhumanism, on the other hand, would be the claim that the meanings of the operative words in any acceptable conception of technologies refer to the states of affairs or events which are in a way or another shaped by technologies. In this paper, I focus on the conception (...)
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  43.  2
    Slavica Jakelić (2014). Humanism and Theoretical Pluralism. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):156-166.
    Christian Smith's What Is a Person? calls for a normative turn in sociology—the grounding of sociology in a theory of human nature. While offering a systematic account of a thick view of personhood—what it should look like, how it can be applied, and why it is needed—the book proposes a critical realist personalism as the best metatheoretical direction for sociology. The author of this essay agrees with the main questions and direction of Smith's project. However, by historicizing the origins and (...)
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  44.  26
    Ernesto Grassi (1980). Rhetoric as Philosophy: The Humanist Tradition. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Originally published in English in 1980, Rhetoric as Philosophy has been out of print for some time. The reviews of that English edition attest to the importance of Ernesto Grassi’s work. By going back to the Italian humanist tradition and aspects of earlier Greek and Latin thought, Ernesto Grassi develops a conception of rhetoric as the basis of philosophy. Grassi explores the sense in which the first principles of rational thought come from the metaphorical power of the word. He finds (...)
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  45.  54
    Leena Kakkori & Rauno Huttunen (2010). The Sartre-Heidegger Controversy on Humanism and the Concept of Man in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (4):351-365.
    Jean-Paul Sartre claims in his 1945 lecture ‘Existentialism is a Humanism’ that there are two kinds of existentialism: that of Christians like Karl Jaspers, and atheistic like Martin Heidegger. Sartre's ‘spiritual master’ Heidegger had no problem with Sartre defining him as an atheist, but he had serious problems with Sartre's concept of humanism and existentialism. Heidegger claims that the essence of humanism lies in the essence of the human being. After the Enlightenment, the Western concept of man (...)
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  46.  8
    Lorenzo Charles Simpson (2001). The Unfinished Project: Towards a Postmetaphysical Humanism. Routledge.
    As humanity becomes increasingly interconnected through globalization, the question of whether community is possible within culturally diverse societies has returned as a principal concern for contemporary thought. Lorenzo Simpson charges that the current discussion is stuck at an impasse-between postmodernism's fragmented notions of cultural difference and humanism's homogeneous versions of community. Simpson proposes an alternative-one that bridges cultural differences without erasing them. He argues that we must establish common aesthetic and ethical standards incorporating sensitivity to difference if we are (...)
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  47.  6
    Aparna Mishra Tarc (2005). Education as Humanism of the Other. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):833–849.
    This paper explores how educators might intervene in canonized texts of the human subject on which a particular and exclusive kind of humanism rests. In imagining possible interventions educators might make, I turn to and trace Jacques Derrida's on‐going deconstruction of the philosophical texts of subjectivity. In his body of work, Derrida destabilizes fixed notions of the human subject and the institutions it founds . From Derrida's points of destabilization and through a differing but similar deconstructive stance, I also (...)
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  48.  57
    Rudolph Bauer (2013). Views and Formulations Within Eastern Philosophy That Negate Personalism and Humanism. Transmission 6.
    This paper focuses on the views and formulations of eastern philosophy the negate humanism and personalism.
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    Rudolph Bauer (2011). Mystical Humanism as Magical Realism. Transmission: Journal of the Awareness Field 2.
    This paper focuses on mystical humanism as magical realism.
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  50. John Edward Toews (1980). Hegelianism: The Path Toward Dialectical Humanism, 1805-1841. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the rise of Hegelian thought throughout the intellectual world in Germany in the first half of the nineteenth century. The book has three interrelated purposes. First, it constitutes the first synthetic description and comprehensive reconstruction of the historical genesis and humanist transformation of Hegelian ideology. Secondly, the study addresses the problem of recurrent patterns of hope and disillusionment in the successive phases of dialectical thought. Finally, the book is concerned with ideological responses to the experience (...)
     
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