Results for 'I. I. I. Chambers'

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  1.  5
    The Vagaries and Vicissitudes of War.I. I. Richard W. Sams - 2023 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 13 (3):170-172.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Vagaries and Vicissitudes of WarRichard W Sams III remember standing in the kitchen of our home on Camp Pendleton—a United States Marine Corps base in Southern California—listening to National Public Radio (NPR) and doing dishes in the fall of 2002. President Bush announced to the world that he was considering a pre-emptive invasion of Iraq on the pretext of Saddam Hussein harboring weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Three (...)
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  2.  12
    An All-Too-Human Enterprise.Tod Chambers - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (7):33-35.
    On reading “Algorithms for Ethical Decision-Making in the Clinical: A Proof of Concept,” I imagined that for some the fundamental problem with the authors' approach is the very...
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  3.  28
    Cultural Politics and the Practice of Fugitive Theory.Samuel A. Chambers - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):9-32.
    If, today, ‘politics is in culture and culture is relentlessly political’ (Brown, 2002), if the domains of ‘the political’ and ‘the cultural’ can no longer be easily distinguished or kept separate, then contemporary political theory requires an understanding and analysis of cultural politics. This essay undertakes the first stages of such a project by trying to theorize ‘cultural politics’. I argue that ‘cultural politics’ proves to be an object of discourse — it indeed has a certain discursive existence — but (...)
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  4. “Who shall judge?” Hobbes, Locke and Kant on the construction on public reason.Simone Chambers - 2009 - Ethics and Global Politics 2 (4):349-368.
    This paper investigates early modern and enlightenment roots of contemporary ideas of public reason. I argue that concepts of public reason arose in answer to the question ‘who shall judge?’ The religious and moral pluralism unleashed by the reformation lead first to the weakening of authoritative common forms of reasoning, this in turn and more importantly lead to the question who is the final arbiter when a political community is faced with deep disagreement about political/ moral questions. The rise of (...)
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  5.  42
    Women's Right to Choose Rationally: Genetic Information, Embryo Selection, and Genetic Manipulation.Jean E. Chambers - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (4):418-428.
    Margaret Brazier has argued that, in the literature on reproductive technology, women's “right” to reproduce is privileged, pushed, and subordinated to patriarchal values in such a way that it amounts to women's old “duty” to reproduce, dressed up in modern guise. I agree that there are patriarchal assumptions made in discussions of whether women have a right to select which embryos to implant or which fetuses to carry to term. Forcing ourselves to see women as active, rational decisionmakers tends to (...)
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  6.  28
    Autonomy and equality in cultural perspective: Response to Sawitri Saharso.Clare Chambers - 2004 - Feminist Theory 5 (3):329-332.
    In “Feminist ethics, autonomy and the politics of multiculturalism”, Sawitri Saharso argues that the feminist concern to protect women’s autonomy legitimates and permits two practices which might otherwise seem antithetical to feminism: hymen repair surgery and sex-selective abortion. Sex-selective abortion is given pragmatic support: since it is rare in the Netherlands (the focus of Saharso’s paper), and since limitations on abortion would adversely affect the autonomy of women who sought an abortion for other reasons, Saharso concludes that Dutch law ought (...)
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  7.  9
    Aesthetic Engagement and Soundscape: A Case of Convenience Store Woman, a Contemporary Japanese Novel.Garcia Chambers - forthcoming - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):36-54.
    The award-winning novel Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata, first published in 2016 as コンビニ人間 (Konbini ningen), has received a lot of media attention from readers of both the original Japanese version and the English translation. For some, the novel depicts the wonder and vulnerability of a culture of convenience and conformity, while others have suggested that it highlights the gender discrimination faced by women in contemporary Japan. Yet the novel is ripe for analyses from other perspectives. This paper presents (...)
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  8. The Greek philosophers from Thales to Aristotle.William Keith Chambers Guthrie - 1950 - New York: Routledge.
    Greek ways of thinking -- Matter and form: (ionians and pythagoreans) -- The problem of motion: (Heraclitus, Parmenides and the pluralists) -- The reaction towards humanism: (the Sophists and Socrates) -- Plato (I): the doctrine of ideas -- Plato (II): ethical and theological answers to the sophists -- Aristotle (I): the aristotelian universe -- Aristotle (II): human beings.
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  9.  67
    Balancing epistemic quality and equal participation in a system approach to deliberative democracy.Simone Chambers - 2017 - Social Epistemology 31 (3):266-276.
    In this paper, I argue that the asymmetrical mediated communication of the broad democratic public sphere can profitably be understood through the lens of deliberative democracy only if we adopt a system approach to deliberation. A system approach, however, often introduces a division of labor between ordinary citizens and experts. Although this division of labor is unavoidable and I believe compatible with a deliberative principle of legitimacy, it flirts with elitist theories of democracy: epistemic elites come up with the agendas, (...)
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  10.  81
    Jacques Rancière and the problem of pure politics.Samuel A. Chambers - 2011 - European Journal of Political Theory 10 (3):303-326.
    Over the past decade, Jacques Rancière’s writings have increasingly provoked and inspired political theorists who wish to avoid both the abstraction of so-called normative theories and the philosophical platitudes of so-called postmodernism. Rancière offers a new and unique definition of politics, la politique, as that which opposes, thwarts and interrupts what Rancière calls the police order, la police — a term that encapsulates most of what we normally think of as politics (the actions of bureaucracies, parliaments, and courts). Interpreters have (...)
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  11.  34
    Democracy and constitutional reform: Deliberative versus populist constitutionalism.Simone Chambers - 2019 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (9-10):1116-1131.
    Constitutional reform has been an important means to push populist authoritarian agendas in Hungary, Poland, Turkey and Venezuela. The embrace of constitutional means and rhetoric in pursuit of these agendas has led to the growing recognition of ‘populist constitutionalism’ as a contemporary political phenomenon. In all four examples mentioned above, democracy, popular sovereignty and direct plebiscitary appeal to the people is the rhetorical and justificatory framework for constitutional reform. This, I worry, gives democracy a bad name and reinforces the widespread (...)
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  12.  66
    The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Sex and Sexuality.Brian D. Earp, Clare Chambers & Lori Watson (eds.) - 2022 - Routledge Handbooks in Philosophy.
    This Handbook covers the most urgent, controversial, and important topics in the philosophy of sex. It is both philosophically rigorous and yet accessible to specialists and non-specialists, covering ethics, political philosophy, metaphysics, the philosophy of science, and the philosophy of language, and featuring interactions with neighboring disciplines such as psychology, bioethics, sociology, and anthropology. The volume's 40 chapters, written by an international team of both respected senior researchers and essential emerging scholars, are divided into eight parts: I. What is Sex? (...)
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  13. Wronging Future Children.K. Lindsey Chambers - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    The dominant framework for addressing procreative ethics has revolved around the notion of harm, largely due to Derek Parfit’s famous non-identity problem. Focusing exclusively on the question of harm treats what procreators owe their offspring as akin to what they would owe strangers (if they owe them anything at all). Procreators, however, usually expect (and are expected) to parent the persons they create, so we cannot understand what procreators owe their offspring without also appealing to their role as prospective parents. (...)
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  14. It’s Complicated: What Our Attitudes toward Pregnancy, Abortion, and Miscarriage Tell Us about the Moral Status of Early Fetuses.K. Lindsey Chambers - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (8):950-965.
    Many accounts of the morality of abortion assume that early fetuses must all have or lack moral status in virtue of developmental features that they share. Our actual attitudes toward early fetuses don’t reflect this all-or-nothing assumption: early fetuses can elicit feelings of joy, love, indifference, or distress. If we start with the assumption that our attitudes toward fetuses reflect a real difference in their moral status, then we need an account of fetal moral status that can explain that difference. (...)
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  15.  29
    Culture, moral topographies, and interactive personhood.John Chambers Christopher - 2007 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27-27 (2-1):170-191.
    This article draws on hermeneutics and interactivism to challenge the prevailing dichotomization of culture/self and fact/value by proposing a theoretical perspective that culture provides a moral framework in which people are embedded and that cultural values and assumptions are distributed across different levels of knowing. I then address the problems of relativism raised by the claim that cultures are different moral topographies, and consider how hermeneutic dialogue is a way of working towards "truth without certainty." I conclude by suggesting that (...)
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  16.  70
    Human Life Is Group Life: Deliberative Democracy for Realists.Simone Chambers - 2018 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 30 (1-2):36-48.
    ABSTRACTSkepticism about citizen competence is a core component of Christopher H. Achen and Larry M. Bartels’s call, in Democracy for Realists, for rethinking our model of democracy. In this paper I suggest that the evidence for citizen incompetence is not as clear as we might think; important research shows that we are good group problem solvers even if we are poor solitary truth seekers. I argue that deliberative democracy theory has a better handle on this fundamental fact of human cognition (...)
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  17.  3
    Recherches sur la tradition platonicienne.William Keith Chambers Guthrie (ed.) - 1957 - [Vérone,: Stamperia Valdonega.
    Plato's views on the nature of the soul, by W.K.C. Guthrie.--Die Erneuerung der Philosophie in der Zeit Ciceros, von O. Gigon.--Gott und Seele im kaiserzeitlichen Denken, von W. Theiler.--Interprétations néo-platonisantes du livre VI de l'Énéide, par P. Courcelle.--Der Platonismus und die altchristliche Gedankenwelt, von J.H. Waszink.--Humanisme et christianisme chez Clément d'Alexandrie d'après le "Pédagogue," par H.I. Marrou.--Some aspects of Platonism in Islamic philosophy, by R. Walzer.
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  18.  60
    My friend was a poem: A philosophical memoir: Chambers My friend was a poem.Timothy Chambers - 2007 - Think 5 (15):31-36.
    The ‘Problem of Evil’ has been the focus of a number of articles in Think. Here, Timothy Chambers offers an unusual perspective on this seemingly intractable difficulty facing theists. ‘Did not I weep for him whose day was hard? Was not my soul grieved for the poor? But when I looked for good, evil came; and when I waited for light, darkness came.’.
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  19.  9
    “Like Nothing I’ve Seen Before”: A Qualitative Inquiry Into the Lived Experience of Competing in a Trail Running Event.Timothy P. Chambers & Jennifer Poidomani - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    BackgroundA recent upsurge in nature-based exercise research demonstrates the potential added benefits of exercising in this context compared to more urban ones. Yet there is a lack of qualitative research investigating the lived experiences of those who participate in nature-based exercise events.ObjectiveTo explore the lived experience of individuals who were first-time participants in a nature-based running event.MethodSix participants who completed the Run Forrest trail run for the first time were individually interviewed. Semi-structured interviews were devised, and participants were invited to (...)
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  20.  24
    Of course I am a relativist and so should you be.Tod Chambers - 2000 - American Journal of Bioethics: Ajob 1 (4).
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  21.  15
    Translating Politics.Samuel Chambers - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (4):524-548.
    My title could be taken to name an object, the politics of translation, but here I emphasize something related yet quite distinct: the practice that the title also identifies—the process of translating politics. This procedure remains bound up with the basic question of how to translate politics, how to put into English what Rancière means when he talks or writes about “politics.” Since the publication of Disagreement in English translation nearly twenty years ago, Rancière’s English-speaking audiences have been much exercised (...)
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  22.  17
    On Cute Monkeys and Repulsive Monsters.Tod S. Chambers - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (6):12-14.
    When I heard that a laboratory in China had cloned two long‐tailed macaques, I thought of Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein. When academics write about the novel, many point out that the reason the creature becomes a “monster” is not that he has any inherently evil qualities but that Victor Frankenstein, the creature's “mother,” immediately rejects him. All later problems can be traced to the fact that Frankenstein does not take responsibility for his creation. While I do not disagree with this, (...)
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  23.  66
    No, you can't steal a kiss.Timothy Chambers - 2009 - Think 8 (21):63-67.
    Here, Timothy Chambers argues that rape is not a sex act. In the follow up piece, I suggest that it is.
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  24.  16
    Telos versus Praxis in Bioethics.Tod S. Chambers - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):41-42.
    The authors of “A Conceptual Model for the Translation of Bioethics Research and Scholarship” argue that bioethics must respond to institutional pressures by demonstrating that it is having an impact in the world. Any impact, the authors observe, must be “informed” by the goals of the discipline of bioethics. The concept of bioethics as a discipline is central to their argument. They begin by citing an essay that Daniel Callahan wrote in the first issue of Hastings Center Studies. Callahan argued (...)
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  25.  55
    Democracy and critique.Simone Chambers - 2015 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (3):213-217.
    In this article I challenge Rainer Forst’s model of critical theory from the point of view of democratic theory. I suggest that his approach is too abstract and hypothetical to address the real world challenges facing democratic polities today.
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  26.  51
    The species problem: seeking new solutions for philosophers and biologists.Geoff Chambers - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):755-765.
    The new millennium has opened with a perfectly splendid decade of scholarship relating to the ‘Species Problem’. So, at least we now have a clear idea of what this is, but still no clear solution that will suit both biologists and philosophers. Richards has recently attempted to capture this story and to fill the void with two projects in one book. The first project is a descriptive and analytical history of the problem, which provides links to other recent works and (...)
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  27.  30
    Is it Enough to Just Say No to Nazis? Comments on Stephen White’s A Democratic Bearing.Simone Chambers - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (2):121-125.
    In this paper I pose two questions for Stephen White and his aspirational model of citizenship. The first is to ask what ethical sources do citizens need to oppose the presence of Nazis in our public sphere. The second is to question White’s deep suspicion of foundationalism and theism as sources of an open and democratic bearing and indeed as sources from which we can build strong opposition to Nazis.
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  28. All must have prizes: the liberal case for intervention in cultural practices.Clare Chambers - 2002 - In Paul Kelly (ed.), Multiculturalism reconsidered: Culture and Equality and its Critics. Polity. pp. 151-173.
    Liberals like choice.1 Human flourishing, they believe, is to some degree dependent on individuals’ ability to choose their ends and actions. However, liberals sometimes fail to note that this principle does not always work in reverse: it does not follow that an individual acting according to her own choices will flourish, or that she will necessarily have the freedom and autonomy which are crucial to flourishing. In this paper, I shall show that even outcomes which result from the choices of (...)
     
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  29.  16
    Confusions in the equipoise concept and the alternative of fully informed overlapping rational decisions.David W. Chambers - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):133-142.
    Despite its several variations, the central position of equipoise is that subjects in clinical experiments should not be randomized to conditions when others believe that better alternatives exist. This position has been challenged over issues of which group in the medical or research community is authorized to make that determination, and it has been argued that informed consent provides sufficient ethical protection for participants independent of equipoise. In this paper I frame ethical participation in clinical research as a two-party decision (...)
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  30.  46
    Do doomsday's proponents think we were born yesterday?Timothy Chambers - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (3):443-450.
    In a recent article, John Leslie has defended the intriguing Carter-Leslie ‘Doomsday Argument’ (Philosophy, January 2000). I argue that an essential presupposition of the argument—that ‘the case of one's name coming out of [an] urn is sufficiently similar to the case of being born into the world’—engenders, in turn, a parallel ‘Ussherian Corollary’. The dubiousness of this Corollary, coupled with independent considerations, casts doubt upon the Carter-Leslie presupposition, and hence, dooms the Doomsday argument.
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  31.  18
    Good guys don't wear white.Tod Chambers - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):8 – 9.
    Professors of philosophy do from time to time seek to wear the clothes of relevanceAlasdair MacIntyre (1984, 36)I recall one of the first bioethics conferences I ever attended. During the question–...
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  32. On behalf of the devil: A parody of Anselm revisited.Timothy Chambers - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):93–113.
    This paper treats a question which first arose in these Proceedings: Can Anselm's ontological argument be inverted so as to yield parallel proofs for the existence (or non-existence) of a least (or worst) conceivable being? Such 'devil parodies' strike some commentators as innocuous curiosities, or redundant challenges which are no more troubling than other parodies found in the literature (e.g., Gaunilo's Island). I take issue with both of these allegations; devil parodies, I argue, have the potential to pose substantive, and (...)
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  33.  4
    Toward the Polyphonic Case.Tod S. Chambers - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (6):10-12.
    Can one publish a bioethics case ethically? I suspect that most in bioethics would feel comfortable publishing a case if the subject—the patient—gave explicit permission, the amount of biographical information revealed was under the control of the subject, and the subject fully understood the benefits and risks of publishing the case. Some might add that the subject should have a chance to approve the final representation. I think that the ethics of publishing cases needs to be rethought. And this rethinking (...)
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  34.  49
    Understanding complexity: Are we making progress?Geoffrey K. Chambers - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (5):747-756.
    In recent years a new conceptual tool called Complexity Theory has come to the attention of scientists and philosophers. This approach is concerned with the emergent properties of interacting systems. It has found wide applicability from cosmology to Social Structure Analysis. However, practitioners are still struggling to find the best way to define complexity and then to measure it. A new book Complexity and the arrow of time by Lineweaver et al. contains contributions from scholars who provide critical reviews of (...)
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  35.  3
    The Icing on the Cake. Or Is it Frosting? The Influence of Group Membership on Children's Lexical Choices.Thomas St Pierre, Jida Jaffan, Craig G. Chambers & Elizabeth K. Johnson - 2024 - Cognitive Science 48 (2):e13410.
    Adults are skilled at using language to construct/negotiate identity and to signal affiliation with others, but little is known about how these abilities develop in children. Clearly, children mirror statistical patterns in their local environment (e.g., Canadian children using zed instead of zee), but do they flexibly adapt their linguistic choices on the fly in response to the choices of different peers? To address this question, we examined the effect of group membership on 7‐ to 9‐year‐olds' labeling of objects in (...)
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  36. Iain Chambers, Migrancy, Culture, Identity.I. MacKenzie - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
     
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  37.  4
    Законодавча діяльність ісландського єпископату у другій половині хі – першій половині хіі ст.I. O. Kravchenko - 2008 - Ukrainian Religious Studies 45:56-66.
    A number of scholars in the history of medieval Iceland have emphasized the exceptional importance of law and justice for Icelandic society. According to American researcher J. Bajok, the focus of Iceland's culture was law, and the relationship between Godi and his heirs was also based on law. The nature of Iceland's socio-political institutions reveals the circumstances in which Icelanders' attitudes towards the law were shaped. The royal power in the country during the Commonwealth period did not arise, and the (...)
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  38.  25
    The Romance of the Western Chamber.C. S. G. & S. I. Hsiung - 1968 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 88 (2):386.
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  39.  37
    The Cuirass Tomb and other Finds at Dendra. Part I: The Chamber Tombs. [REVIEW]Sinclair Hood - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (2):331-332.
  40.  17
    Echo Chambers and Moral Progress.Tyler Wark - forthcoming - Episteme:1-15.
    In this paper, I argue that echo chambers pose a problem for moral progress because of their threat to moral reasoning. I argue for two theses about the epistemology of moral progress: (1) the practical utility thesis: moral reasoning plays an important role in improving moral judgments, and (2) the conflictive social reasoning thesis: the kind of moral reasoning that is important for moral progress involves social reasoning with disputants. Without some conflict, human beings will naturally reason in a (...)
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  41.  6
    “I was stealing some skulls from the bone chamber when a bigamist cleric stopped me.” Karl Ernst von Baer and the development of physical anthropology in Europe.Erki Tammiksaar & Ken Kalling - 2018 - Centaurus 60 (4):276-293.
    What was probably the first collection of human skulls for purposes of study was established by Johann Friedrich Blumenbach in Göttingen at the end of the 18th century. In subsequent years, the number of such collections increased, but their importance for scientific research remained modest. A breakthrough took place only in the 1850s when studies on the so-called cranial index by Karl Ernst von Baer and Anders Retzius gave skull collections a new lease on life, raising physical anthropology from a (...)
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  42.  5
    Echo Chamber as a Technology of Communication Influence.Olena Shcherbyna, Vitaly Krikun & Tamila Baulina - 2023 - Bulletin of Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv Philosophy 2 (9):68-72.
    B a c k g r o u n d. The article examines the appearance, essence and formation of the concept of "echo chamber" in the field of philosophy. The main interpretations and practical aspects of the application of this concept by representatives of the philosophical community are considered. Considering the lack of an established version of the concept of "echo chamber", an attempt was made to define its meaning by analogy with the already established interpretation of a physical analogue, (...)
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  43.  6
    “I was able to take part in the chamber as if I was there” – women local councillors, remote meeting attendance, and Covid-19: a positive from the pandemic?Leah Hibbs - 2022 - Journal for Cultural Research 26 (1):6-23.
    This article explores research findings regarding the possibilities offered by remote attendance at council meetings as implemented during the coronavirus pandemic, and reflects upon how...
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  44. Echo Chambers and Audio Signal Processing.Benjamin Elzinga - 2020 - Episteme:1-21.
    Following Cass Sunstein's popular treatment of the concept, echo chambers are often defined as environments which exclude contrary opinions through omission. C. Thi Nguyen contests the popular usage and defines echo chambers in terms of in-group trust and out-group distrust. In this paper, I argue for a more comprehensive treatment. While both exclusion by omission and out-group distrust help sustain echo chambers, neither defines the phenomenon. I develop a social network model of echo chambers which focuses (...)
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  45. Echo Chambers, Ignorance and Domination.Breno R. G. Santos - 2021 - Social Epistemology 35 (2):109-119.
    My aim in this paper is to engage with C. Thi Nguyen’s characterization of the echo chamber and to propose two things. First, I argue that a proper reading of his concept of echo chamber should make use of the notion of ignorance in the form of a structural epistemic insensitivity. My main contention is that ignorance as a substantive structural practice accounts for the epistemically deleterious effects of echo chambers. Second, I propose that from the talk of ignorance (...)
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  46. Cognitive islands and runaway echo chambers: problems for epistemic dependence on experts.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - Synthese 197 (7):2803-2821.
    I propose to study one problem for epistemic dependence on experts: how to locate experts on what I will call cognitive islands. Cognitive islands are those domains for knowledge in which expertise is required to evaluate other experts. They exist under two conditions: first, that there is no test for expertise available to the inexpert; and second, that the domain is not linked to another domain with such a test. Cognitive islands are the places where we have the fewest resources (...)
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  47.  77
    Echo chambers, polarization, and “Post-truth”: In search of a connection.Wade Munroe - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology.
    The US populace appears to be increasingly polarized on partisan lines. Political fissures bifurcate the country even on empirical matters like vaccine safety and anthropogenic climate change. There now exists an ever-expanding interdisciplinary research program in which theorists attempt to explain increases in political polarization and myriad other phenomena collected under the “post-truth” heading by appeal to social-epistemic structures, like echo chambers and epistemic bubbles, that affect the flow and uptake of information in various communities. In this paper, I (...)
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  48. Echo Chambers and Friendship.Alper Güngör - forthcoming - Episteme:1-13.
    Are the members of echo chambers blameworthy for their beliefs? If we follow Sarah Stroud's account of friendship, we end up with the following conclusion: if echo chambers involve friendship, then the individuals have strong reasons not to live up to epistemic demands or ideals when the friendships are formed in the echo chambers they are members of. This result stands in striking contrast with the received view, according to which the members of echo chambers are (...)
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  49.  33
    Echo Chambers and Audio Signal Processing.Benjamin Elzinga - 2022 - Episteme 19 (3):373-393.
    Following Cass Sunstein's popular treatment of the concept, echo chambers are often defined as environments which exclude contrary opinions through omission. C. Thi Nguyen contests the popular usage and defines echo chambers in terms of in-group trust and out-group distrust. In this paper, I argue for a more comprehensive treatment. While both exclusion by omission and out-group distrust help sustain echo chambers, neither defines the phenomenon. I develop a social network model of echo chambers which focuses (...)
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  50. Echo Chambers and Social Media: On the Possibilities of a Tax Incentive Solution.Megan Fritts - 2023 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 12 (7):13-19.
    In “Regulating social media as a public good: Limiting epistemic segregation” (2022), Toby Handfield tackles a well-known problematic aspect of widespread social media use: the formation of ideologically monotone and insulated social networks. Handfield argues that we can take some cues from economics to reduce the extent to which echo chambers grow up around individual users. Specifically, he argues that tax incentives to encourage network heterophily may be levied at any of three different groups: individual social media users, social (...)
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