Results for 'I. I. I. George Robert Williams'

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  1.  28
    Book Reviews Section 1.John E. Merryman, Sister Mary Olga Mckenna, George I. Brown, Robert O. Hahn, George Male, Donald P. Sanders, John W. Holland, John Buttrick, Erma F. Muckenhirn, Richard E. Schultz, Richard Elardo, Donald R. Warren, Alfred H. Moore, John Follman, Helen I. Snyder & Chester S. Williams - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (3):145-155.
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  2.  16
    A Companion to Cognitive Science.George Graham & William Bechtel (eds.) - 1998 - Blackwell.
    Part I: The Life of Cognitive Science:. William Bechtel, Adele Abrahamsen, and George Graham. Part II: Areas of Study in Cognitive Science:. 1. Analogy: Dedre Gentner. 2. Animal Cognition: Herbert L. Roitblat. 3. Attention: A.H.C. Van Der Heijden. 4. Brain Mapping: Jennifer Mundale. 5. Cognitive Anthropology: Charles W. Nuckolls. 6. Cognitive and Linguistic Development: Adele Abrahamsen. 7. Conceptual Change: Nancy J. Nersessian. 8. Conceptual Organization: Douglas Medin and Sandra R. Waxman. 9. Consciousness: Owen Flanagan. 10. Decision Making: J. Frank (...)
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  3.  22
    Book Reviews Section 4.E. Paul Torrance, John Walton, Calvin O. Dyer, Virgil S. Ward, Weldon Beckner, Manouchehr Pedram, William M. Alexander, Herman J. Peters, James B. Macdonald, Samuel E. Kellams, Walter L. Hodges, Gary R. Mckenzie, Robert E. Jewett, Doris A. Trojcak, H. Parker Blount, George I. Brown, Lucile Lindberg, James C. Baughman, Patricia H. Dahl, S. Jay Samuels & Christopher J. Lucas - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (4):239-255.
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  4. By William A. Dembski.William A. Dembski - unknown
    I have before me a letter dated January 5, 2000 from Bradford Wilson, the executive director of the NAS. It begins, “I really enjoyed your contribution to the recent symposium in the January issue of First Things, so much so that I’ve also decided to invite you to join the NAS. Many of your fellow contributors including Robert George, Jeffrey Satinover, and Father Neuhaus are among our current members, and I think you’d find it well worth your while (...)
     
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  5.  10
    The Letters of George Santayana, Book Two, 1910--1920: The Works of George Santayana, Volume V.William G. Holzberger & Herman J. Saatkamp (eds.) - 2001 - MIT Press.
    Since the first selection of George Santayana's letters was published in 1955, shortly after his death, many more letters have been located. The Works of George Santayana, Volume V, brings together a total of more than 3,000 letters. The volume is divided chronologically into eight books of roughly comparable length. Book Two covers Santayana's first decade as a "freelance philosopher," following his resignation from Harvard University and move to Europe. Of particular interest is Santayana's continuing correspondence with the (...)
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  6.  24
    Seeking Consensus: A Clarification and Defense of Altered Nuclear Transfer.William B. Hurlbut, Robert P. George & Markus Grompe - 2006 - Hastings Center Report 36 (5):42-50.
  7. ANT vs. SCNT-reply.William B. Hurlbut, Robert P. George & Markus Grompe - 2006 - Hastings Center Report 36 (6):7-7.
     
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  8.  3
    Seeking Consensus.William B. Hurlbut, Robert P. George & Markus Grompe - 2007 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (2):339-352.
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  9.  34
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Steven I. Miller, Frank A. Stone, William K. Medlin, Clinton Collins, W. Robert Morford, Marc Belth, John T. Abrahamson, Albert W. Vogel, J. Don Reeves, Richard D. Heyman, K. Armitage, Stewart E. Fraser, Edward R. Beauchamp, Clark C. Gill, Edward J. Nemeth, Gordon C. Ruscoe, Charles H. Lyons, Douglas N. Jackson, Bemman N. Phillips, Melvin L. Silberman, Charles E. Pascal, Richard E. Ripple, Harold Cook, Morris L. Bigge, Irene Athey, Sandra Gadell, John Gadell, Daniel S. Parkinson, Nyal D. Royse & Isaac Brown - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (1):1-28.
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  10.  26
    Haskell B. Curry and Robert Feys. Combinatory logic. Volume I. With two sections by William Craig. Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics. North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam1958, xvi + 417 pp. [REVIEW]J. Barkley Rosser - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (2):267-268.
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  11. Does Value Pluralism Entail Liberalism?Robert Talisse - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):303-320.
    Isaiah Berlin repeatedly attempted to derive liberalism from value pluralism. It is generally agreed that Berlin 's arguments fail; however, neo-Berlinians have taken up the project of securing the entailment. This paper begins with an account of why the Berlinian project seems attractive to contemporary theorists. I then examine Berlin 's argument. With this background in place, I argue that recent attempts by William Galston and George Crowder to rescue the Berlinian project do not succeed.
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  12.  18
    Indian Philosophy. Vol. I.William H. Roberts - 1924 - Journal of Philosophy 21 (14):377-381.
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  13. Disgust as Heuristic.Robert William Fischer - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (3):679-693.
    Suppose that disgust can provide evidence of moral wrongdoing. What account of disgust might make sense of this? A recent and promising theory is the social contagion view, proposed by Alexandra Plakias. After criticizing both its descriptive and normative claims, I draw two conclusions. First, we should question the wisdom of drawing so straight a line from biological poisons and pathogens to social counterparts. Second, we don’t need to explain the evidential value of disgust by appealing to what the response (...)
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  14. Theory Selection in Modal Epistemology.Robert William Fischer - 2015 - American Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):381-395.
    Accounts of modal knowledge are many and varied. How should we choose between them? I propose that we employ inference to the best explanation, and I suggest that there are three desiderata that we should use to rank hypotheses: conservatism, simplicity, and the ability to handle disagreement. After examining these desiderata, I contend that they can’t be used to justify belief in the modal epistemology that fares best, but that they can justify our accepting it in an epistemically significant sense. (...)
     
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  15.  25
    Church teaching as the ‘language’ of catholic theology.William J. Hoye - 1987 - Heythrop Journal 28 (1):16-30.
    Book reviewed in this article: In Search of History: Historiography in the Ancient World and the Origins of Biblical History. By John Van Seters. The Hidden God: The Hiding of the Face of God in the Old Testament. By Samuel E. Balentine. Theodicy in the Old Testament. Edited by James L. Crenshaw. Ce Dieu censé aimer la Souffrance. By François Varone. Evil and Evolution, A Theodicy. By Richard W. Kropf. ‘Poet and Peasant’ and ‘Through Peasant Eyes’: A Literary‐Cultural Approach to (...)
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  16.  32
    Infanticide and madness.Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):299-301.
    I am, of course, aware that infanticide was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome, and is still practiced in places like India and China today; just as I am aware that slavery was accepted and practiced in ancient Greece and Rome , and is still practiced in some places today. But if philosophers, no matter how sophisticated, were to step forward today to argue that slavery is morally acceptable , I would call that madness.Of course, the ‘madness’ I (...)
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  17.  3
    Responses to Part I: Applications of George Ellis’s Theory of Causation.George F. R. Ellis - 2021 - In Jan Voosholz & Markus Gabriel (eds.), Top-Down Causation and Emergence. Springer Verlag. pp. 329-344.
    In this response, George Ellis comments on the publications of Part I. He responds first to Sara Green and Robert Batterman, before outlining his thoughts on Otávio Bueno’s piece.
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  18. Disgust and the Collection of Bovine Fetal Blood.Robert William Fischer - 2014 - In Elisa Aaltola & John Hadley (eds.), Animal Ethics and Philosophy: Questioning the Orthodoxy. Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 151-164.
    At many slaughterhouses, if a pregnant cow is killed, then medical companies pay to harvest the fetus's blood. When you communicate the details of this process to people, many of them are disgusted. I submit that those who are repulsed thereby acquire a reason to believe that this practice is morally wrong. However, it is controversial to maintain that disgust can provide moral guidance. So, I develop a theory of disgust’s moral salience that fits with the empirical work that’s been (...)
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  19.  68
    Why it doesn’t matter whether the virtues are truth-conducive.Robert William Fischer - 2014 - Synthese 191 (6):1-15.
    A potential explanation of a fact is a hypothesis such that, if it were true, it would explain the fact in question. Let’s suppose that we become aware of a fact and some potential explanations thereof. Let’s also suppose that we would like to believe the truth. Given this aim, we can ask two questions. First, is it likely that one of these hypotheses is true? Second, given an affirmative answer to the first question, which one is it likely to (...)
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  20.  61
    Modal Knowledge, in Theory.Robert William Fischer - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):227-235.
    Some philosophers think that a person can justifi ably believe that p is possible even though she has no theory according to which p is possible. They think, for example, that she can justifiably believe that there could be naturally purple elephants even though she lacks (inter alia) a theory about the factors germane to elephant pigmentation. There is a certain optimism about this view: it seems to assume that people are fairly good at ferreting out problems with proposed modal (...)
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  21.  36
    Whose Realism? Which Legitimacy? Ideologies of Domination and Post-Rawlsian Political Theory.William Clare Roberts - 2022 - Analyse & Kritik 44 (1):41-60.
    There is something amiss about post-Rawlsian efforts to bring political theory down to earth by insisting upon the political primacy of the question of legitimacy, peace, or order. The intuition driving much realism seems to be that we must first agree to get along, and only then can we get down to the business of pursuing justice. I argue that the ideological narratives of the powerful pose a political problem for this primacy of legitimacy thesis. To prioritize the achievement of (...)
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  22. Paul Gross's dilemma: An open letter to the national association of scholars in response to Paul Gross's article on intelligent design in the nas's september 2003 issue of science insights.William Dembski - manuscript
    I have before me a letter dated January 5, 2000 from Bradford Wilson, the executive director of the NAS. It begins, “I really enjoyed your contribution to the recent symposium in the January issue of First Things, so much so that I’ve also decided to invite you to join the NAS. Many of your fellow contributors including Robert George, Jeffrey Satinover, and Father Neuhaus are among our current members, and I think you’d find it well worth your while (...)
     
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  23. Why Incest is Usually Wrong.Robert William Fischer - 2012 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):17-31.
    I contend that there are strong moral reasons for most adult family members to avoid having sex with one another; indeed, I argue that even among consenting adults, incestuous sex is usually wrong. The argument is simple. Absent compelling reasons, it's wrong to take a significant risk with something that's extremely valuable. But having sex with a family member takes a significant risk with something extremely valuable—namely, a family relationship. And since compelling reasons for taking such a risk are very (...)
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  24.  66
    Hegelians Axel Honneth and Robert Williams on the Development of Human Morality.Rauno Huttunen - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (4):339-355.
    An individual is in the lowest phase of moral development if he thinks only of his own personal interest and has only his own selfish agenda in his mind as he encounters other humans. This lowest phase corresponds well with sixteenth century British moral egoism which reflects the rise of the new economic order. Adam Smith (1723–1790) wanted to defend this new economic order which is based on economic exchange between egoistic individuals. Nevertheless, he surely did not want to support (...)
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  25.  14
    Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries Victorian Science: A Self-Portrait from the Presidential Addresses of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Ed. by George Basalla, William Coleman, and Robert H. Kargon. New York: Doubleday, and London: Bell, 1970. Pp. x + 510. £1.20. [REVIEW]J. B. Morrell - 1972 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (1):99-100.
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  26. Conscience and its enemies: confronting the dogmas of liberal secularism.Robert P. George - 2013 - Wilmington, Delaware: ISI Books.
    "Many in elite circles yield to the temptation to believe that anyone who disagrees with them is a bigot or a religious fundamentalist. Reason and science, they confidently believe, are on their side. With this book, I aim to expose the emptiness of that belief." --From the introductionAssaults on religious liberty and traditional morality are growing fiercer. Here, at last, is the counterattack.Showcasing the talents that have made him one of America's most acclaimed and influential thinkers, Robert P. (...) explodes the myth that the secular elite represents the voice of reason. In fact, George shows, it is on the elite side of the cultural divide where the prevailing views frequently are nothing but articles of faith. Conscience and Its Enemies reveals the bankruptcy of these too often smugly held orthodoxies while presenting powerfully reasoned arguments for classical virtues.In defending what James Madison called the "sacred rights of conscience"--rights for which government shows frightening contempt--George grapples with today's most controversial issues: abortion and infanticide, same-sex marriage, genetic manipulation, euthanasia and assisted suicide, religion in politics, judicial activism, and more. His brilliantly argued essays rely not on theological claims or religious authority but on established scientific facts and a philosophical tradition that extends back to Plato and Aristotle.Conscience and Its Enemies elevates our national debates. It sets forth powerful arguments that secular liberals are unaccustomed to hearing--and that embattled defenders of traditional morality so often fail to marshal. It also lays out the principles and arguments for rebuilding a moral order. (shrink)
     
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  27.  8
    Plato and the Individual.Robert William Hall - 1963 - The Hague: M. Nijhoff.
    In this study of Plato's theory of the individual, I propose to show that Plato is deeply concerned with the achievement by each person of the moral excellence appropriate to man. Plato exhibits profound interest in the moral well being of each individual, not merely those who are philosophically gifted. Obviously my study is in opposition with a traditional line of interpretation which holds that Plato evinces small concern for the ordinary individual, the "common man" of today. According to this (...)
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  28. The Naturalist's Dilemma: Logic and Ontological Naturalism.Robert William Barnard - 2000 - Dissertation, Memphis State University
    Ontological Naturalism holds that our fundamental ontology contains only those generally natural objects, properties, and relations required by our best scientific theory. Logical principles are thought of as being normative of correct inference and as involving necessary truths and relations. Necessary relations are stronger than the relations described by science; norms are traditionally thought to be separate from the descriptive project of science. Yet, ontological theories, including ontological naturalism, employ logic freely without offering an account of logical normativity and necessity. (...)
     
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  29.  30
    David U. Himmelstein practices medi.Daniel Callahan, R. Alta Charo, Guang-Shing Cheng, Frank A. Chervenak, Robert P. George, Susan Dorr Goold, Lawrence O. Gostin, Markus Grompe, William B. Hurlbut & Insoo Hyun - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  30.  43
    Response to: Is the pro-choice position for infanticide 'madness'?Robert P. George - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):302-302.
    As Charles Camosy observes, he and I agree more than we disagree. He believes with no less conviction than I do that deliberately killing infant children is profoundly morally wrong and a grave violation of human rights.1 So where do we disagree?I think that killing infant children, or promoting the moral permissibility of doing so, is moral madness, and that we should say so, rather than treating infanticide as just one more legitimate, albeit in the end morally mistaken view. We (...)
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  31. Value Pluralism and Liberal Politics.Robert B. Talisse - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):87-100.
    Contemporary Neo-Berlinians contend that value pluralism is the best account of the moral universe we inhabit; they also contend that value pluralism provides a powerful case for liberalism. In this paper, I challenge both claims. Specifically, I will examine the arguments offered in support of value pluralism; finding them lacking, I will then offer some reasons for thinking that value pluralism is not an especially promising view of our moral universe.
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  32.  35
    Book Reviews Section 3.James L. Jarrett, Walter P. Krolikowski, Charles R. Estes, Hugh C. Black, Charles S. Benson, John Lipkin, Gerald T. Kowitz, Anthony Scarangello, Langston C. Bannister, David N. Campbell, Christine C. Swarm, Steven I. Miller, David H. Ford, William J. Mathis, Don Kauchak, Paul R. Klohr, George W. Bright, Joyce Ann Rich, Edward F. Dash & Marvin Willerman - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (3):155-168.
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  33. Tuitions and intuitions: essays at the intersection of film criticism and philosophy.William Rothman - 2019 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    Introduction: how John the Baptist kept his head, or my life in film philosophy -- A philosophical perspective. Why not realize your world? -- Silence and stasis -- Film and modernity -- André Bazin as Cavellian realist -- On Stanley Cavell's band wagon -- What becomes of the camera in the world on film? -- Studies in criticism. "I never thought I would sink so low as to become an actor": John Barrymore in Twentieth century -- James Stewart in Vertigo (...)
     
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  34.  5
    Perspectives on the Philosophy of William P. Alston.William P. Alston, Carl Ginet, Alvin I. Goldman, John Greco, George I. Mavrodes, Philip L. Quinn, Alessandra Tanesini, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Linda Zagzebski & Laurence BonJour - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    One of the most influential analytic philosophers of the late twentieth century, William P. Alston is a leading light in epistemology, philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of language. In this volume, twelve leading philosophers critically discuss the central topics of his work in these areas, including perception, epistemic circularity, justification, the problem of religious diversity, and truth.
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  35.  18
    The Rāmāyaṇa of Vālmīki: An Epic of Ancient India, Vol. III: ĀraṇyakāṇḍaThe Forest Book of the Rāmāyaṇa of KampaṉThe Ramayana of Valmiki: An Epic of Ancient India, Vol. III: AranyakandaThe Forest Book of the Ramayana of Kampan.Richard W. Lariviere, Sheldon I. Pollock, Robert P. Goldman, Vālmīki, George L. Hart, Hank Heifetz, Kampaṉ, Valmiki & Kampan - 1993 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 113 (2):325.
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  36.  7
    “I suppose I ought to say something about the war”: William James, Pragmatism and the War with Spain, 1898.E. Paul Colella - 2020 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 56 (1):81-104.
    “…in every genuine metaphysical debate some practical issue, however conjectural and remote, is involved”By all accounts, William James was having an astonishing year in 1898. Robert D. Richardson describes him as “a man of unlimited energy” teaching a full load amid his crowded schedule of public lecturing. His writing was in full force; the Will to Believe had just appeared in print, and his Talks to Teachers series which was drawing appreciative audiences wherever he gave them were in preparation (...)
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  37.  25
    Walter Scheps and J. Anna Looney, Middle Scots Poets: A Reference Guide to James I of Scotland, Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, and Gavin Douglas. (A Reference Guide to Literature.) Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986. Pp. xvi, 292. $55. [REVIEW]Lois A. Ebin - 1987 - Speculum 62 (4):1035-1036.
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  38. Leviathan, Parts I and II - Revised Edition.A. P. Martinich & Brian Battiste (eds.) - 2010 - Broadview Press.
    Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan is the greatest work of political philosophy in English and the first great work of philosophy in English. Beginning with premises that were sometimes controversial, such as that every human action is caused by the agent’s desire for his own good, Hobbes derived shocking conclusions, such as that the civil government enjoys absolute control over its citizens and that the sovereign has the right to determine which religion is to be practiced in a commonwealth. Hobbes’s contemporaries recognized (...)
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  39. Leviathan, Parts I and Ii - Revised Edition.A. P. Martinich & Brian Battiste (eds.) - 2010 - Broadview Press.
    Thomas Hobbes’s _Leviathan_ is the greatest work of political philosophy in English and the first great work of philosophy in English. Beginning with premises that were sometimes controversial, such as that every human action is caused by the agent’s desire for his own good, Hobbes derived shocking conclusions, such as that the civil government enjoys absolute control over its citizens and that the sovereign has the right to determine which religion is to be practiced in a commonwealth. Hobbes’s contemporaries recognized (...)
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  40.  13
    Le public rationnel et la démocratie : Extrait de Reconsidering the democratic public, sous la direction de George E. Marcus et de Russel L. Hanson, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993, p. 35-64. [REVIEW]Benjamin I. Page, Robert Y. Shapiro & Laurence Monnoyer-Smith - 2001 - Hermes 31:93.
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  41.  18
    Achievable benchmarks of care: the ABC TM s of benchmarking.Norman W. Weissman, Jeroan J. Allison, Catarina I. Kiefe, Robert M. Farmer, Michael T. Weaver, O. Dale Williams, Ian G. Child, Judy H. Pemberton, Kathleen C. Brown & C. Suzanne Baker - 1999 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (3):269-281.
  42.  40
    G. W. F. Hegel, Robert F. Brown (ed., Tr.), Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy[REVIEW]Robert R. Williams - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
  43. “The Church.William J. Abraham, Jose Miguez Bonino, Robert F. Drinan, Leo Pfeffer, Seymour Siegel, George Huntston Williams & Sharon L. Worthing - 2010 - In Charles Taliaferro & Chad V. Meister (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Philosophical Theology. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  44.  11
    An Annotated Bibliography of Islamic Science. Volume I. Seyyed Hossein Nasr, William C. Chittick.Robert E. Hall - 1978 - Isis 69 (3):457-461.
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  45.  11
    An Annotated Bibliography of Islamic Science. Volume I by Seyyed Hossein Nasr; William C. Chittick. [REVIEW]Robert Hall - 1978 - Isis 69:457-461.
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  46.  7
    Physics, Philosophy, and Theology: A Common Quest for Understanding.Robert J. Russell, William R. Stoeger & George V. Coyne (eds.) - 1988 - University of Notre Dame Press [Distributor].
  47.  16
    William R. Jordon III and George M. Lubick. Making Nature Whole: A History of Ecological Restoration.Robert L. Chapman - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (3):367-370.
  48.  21
    Book Reviews Section 2.Robert Cowen, Sean D. Healy, Edgar B. Gumbert, Geoffrey M. Ibim, Fannie R. Cooley, Stuart J. Cohen, Maurice F. Freehill, Evan R. Powell, Virginia K. Wiegand, Geraldine Johncich Clifford, Charles E. Mcclelland, George C. Stone, Glenn C. Atkyns, Barbara Finkelstein, Gene P. Agre, Alton Harrison Jr & William G. Williams - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (4):210-221.
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  49.  17
    George Dykhuizen 1899-1987.Robert W. Hall & William E. Mann - 1987 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 61 (1):167 - 168.
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  50. Learning via queries in $\lbrack +,.William I. Gasarch, Mark G. Pleszkoch & Robert Solovay - 1992 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 57 (1):53-81.
    We prove that the set of all recursive functions cannot be inferred using first-order queries in the query language containing extra symbols $\lbrack +, . The proof of this theorem involves a new decidability result about Presburger arithmetic which is of independent interest. Using our machinery, we show that the set of all primitive recursive functions cannot be inferred with a bounded number of mind changes, again using queries in $\lbrack +, . Additionally, we resolve an open question in [7] (...)
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