Results for 'I. Lane'

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  1.  67
    Chunking Mechanisms in Human Learning.F. Gobet, P. Lane, S. Croker, P. Cheng, G. Jones, I. OlIver & J. Pine - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):236-243.
  2. Why I Was Never a Zygote.Robert Lane - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):63-83.
    Don Marquis has argued that abortion is immoral because it deprives the fetus of a "future like ours." But Marquis's argument fails by incorrectly assuming that a zygote and the late-term fetus with which it is physically continuous are numerically identical. In fact, the identity of a prebirth human (PBH) across gestation is indeterminate, such that it is determinately morally permissible to destroy an early-term PBH and determinately immoral to destroy a late-term PBH. Beginning at some indeterminate point during gestation (...)
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  3. The Final Incapacity: Peirce on Intuition and the Continuity of Mind and Matter, Part I.Robert Lane - 2011 - Cognitio 12 (1).
    This is the first of two papers that examine Charles Peirce’s denial that human beings have a faculty of intuition. The semiotic and epistemo-logical aspects of that denial are well-known. My focus is on its neglected metaphysical aspect, which I argue amounts to the doctrine that there is no determinate boundary between the internal world of the cognizing subject and the external world that the subject cognizes. In the second paper, I will argue that the “objective idealism” of Peirce’s 1890s (...)
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  4. Nominalism and Divine Aseity.William Lane Craig & I. Theological Prolegomena - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 4 (1).
     
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  5. When Actions Feel Alien: An Explanatory Model.Timothy Lane - 2014 - In Tzu-Wei Hung (ed.), Communicative Action. Springer Science+Business. pp. 53-74.
    It is not necessarily the case that we ever have experiences of self, but human beings do regularly report instances for which self is experienced as absent. That is there are times when body parts, mental states, or actions are felt to be alien. Here I sketch an explanatory framework for explaining these alienation experiences, a framework that also attempts to explain the “mental glue” whereby self is bound to body, mind, or action. The framework is a multi-dimensional model that (...)
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  6.  46
    Toward a Propensity Interpretation of Stochastic Mechanism for the Life Sciences.Lane DesAutels - 2015 - Synthese 192 (9):2921-2953.
    In what follows, I suggest that it makes good sense to think of the truth of the probabilistic generalizations made in the life sciences as metaphysically grounded in stochastic mechanisms in the world. To further understand these stochastic mechanisms, I take the general characterization of mechanism offered by MDC :1–25, 2000) and explore how it fits with several of the going philosophical accounts of chance: subjectivism, frequentism, Lewisian best-systems, and propensity. I argue that neither subjectivism, frequentism, nor a best-system-style interpretation (...)
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  7.  38
    Against Regular and Irregular Characterizations of Mechanisms.Lane DesAutels - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (5):914-925.
    This article addresses the question of whether we should conceive of mechanisms as productive of change in a regular way. I argue that, if mechanisms are characterized as fully regular, on the one hand, then not enough processes will count as mechanisms for them to be interesting or useful. If no appeal to regularity is made at all in their characterization, on the other hand, then mechanisms can no longer be useful for grounding prediction and supporting intervention strategies. I conclude (...)
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  8. Sober and Elgin on Laws of Biology: A Critique. [REVIEW]Lane DesAutels - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (2):249-256.
    In this short discussion note, I discuss whether any of the generalizations made in biology should be construed as laws. Specifically, I examine a strategy offered by Elliot Sober ( 1997 ) and supported by Mehmet Elgin ( 2006 ) to reformulate certain biological generalizations so as to eliminate their contingency, thereby allowing them to count as laws. I argue that this strategy entails a conception of laws that is unacceptable on two counts: (1) Sober and Elgin’s approach allows the (...)
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  9. Higher-Order Thought and Pathological Self: The Case of Somatoparaphrenia.Caleb Liang & Timothy Lane - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):661-668.
    According to Rosenthal’s Higher-Order Thought (HOT) theory of consciousness, first-order mental states become conscious only when they are targeted by HOTs that necessarily represent the states as belonging to self. On this view a state represented as belonging to someone distinct from self could not be a conscious state. Rosenthal develops this view in terms of what he calls the ‘thin immunity principle’ (TIP). According to TIP, when I experience a conscious state, I cannot be wrong about whether it is (...)
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  10. Resting State Glutamate Predicts Elevated Pre-Stimulus Alpha During Self-Relatedness: A Combined EEG-MRS Study on 'Rest-Self' Overlap.Yu Bai, Timothy Lane, Georg Northoff & et al - 2015 - Social Neuroscience:DOI:10.1080/17470919.2015.107258.
    Recent studies have demonstrated neural overlap between resting state activity and self-referential processing. This “rest-self” overlap occurs especially in anterior cortical midline structures like the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC). However, the exact neurotemporal and biochemical mechanisms remain to be identified. Therefore, we conducted a combined electroencephalography (EEG)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study. EEG focused on pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) power changes to assess the degree to which those changes can predict subjects’ perception (and judgment) of subsequent (...)
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  11.  6
    Sinews of RevolutionMarxist Esthetics.David I. Grossvogel, Henri Arvon & Helen Lane - 1974 - Diacritics 4 (1):14.
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  12. Self-Consciousness and Immunity.Timothy Lane & Caleb Liang - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (2):78-99.
    Sydney Shoemaker, developing an idea of Wittgenstein’s, argues that we are immune to error through misidentification relative to the first-person pronoun. Although we might be liable to error when “I” (or its cognates) is used as an object, we are immune to error when “I” is used as a subject (as when one says, “I have a toothache”). Shoemaker claims that the relationship between “I” as-subject and the mental states of which it is introspectively aware is tautological: when, say, we (...)
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  13.  6
    If I Want to Perform Better, Then How Should I Feel?Andrew M. Lane - 2013 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 44 (2):130-136.
    Research indicates that emotions are predictive of sports performance. The application of emotion research to practice is that intervention strategies can be used to change emotions to enhance performance. The present study examined emotional profiles associated with successful performance. A review of studies indicate that there are general trends, that is, high activation emotions such as excitement and vigor tend to associate with good performance and low activation unpleasant emotions such as depression and dejection tend to associate with poor performance. (...)
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  14.  14
    Recuperating the Real: New Materialism, Object-Oriented Ontology, and Neo-Lacanian Ontical Cartography.Caleb Cates, M. Lane Bruner & I. I. I. Joseph T. Moss - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):151-175.
    The spring, summer, and fall 2006 editions of Critical Inquiry hosted a heated exchange between Ernesto Laclau and Slavoj Žižek regarding the proper definition of the Lacanian Real. Žižek claims "the Real is the inexorable abstract spectral logic of capital that determines what goes on in social reality". In response, Laclau states that Žižek's "spectral logic of capital" is a gross distortion of Lacanian theory: "The Real is not a specifiable object endowed with laws of movement on its own but, (...)
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  15. Self, Belonging, and Conscious Experience: A Critique of Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness.Timothy Lane - 2015 - In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed consciousness: New essays on psychopathology and theories of consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 103-140.
    Subjectivity theories of consciousness take self-reference, somehow construed, as essential to having conscious experience. These theories differ with respect to how many levels they posit and to whether self-reference is conscious or not. But all treat self-referencing as a process that transpires at the personal level, rather than at the subpersonal level, the level of mechanism. -/- Working with conceptual resources afforded by pre-existing theories of consciousness that take self-reference to be essential, several attempts have been made to explain seemingly (...)
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  16.  70
    Peirce's Modal Shift: From Set Theory to Pragmaticism.Robert Lane - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):551-576.
    For many years, Charles Peirce maintained that all senses of the modal terms "possible" and "necessary" can be defined in terms of "states of information." But in 1896, he was motivated by his work in set theory to criticize that account of modality, and in 1905 he characterized that criticism as a return "to the Aristotelian doctrine of a real possibility ... the great step that was needed to render pragmaticism an intelligible doctrine." But since Peirce was a realist about (...)
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  17.  6
    Home Who Am I? Curriculum Vitae Media Photos Search Publications Conferences and Lectures Research Topics Zen Memetics.Allen Lane - unknown
    Among the avalanche of new books on consciousness it would be hard to find two whose authors hold more dramatically different views than these. While Benjamin Libet describes his own famous experiments and concludes that consciousness is a field with powerful effects, Edelman builds his theory on the assumption that the world is causally closed and consciousness is devoid of casual efficacy.
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  18.  6
    Institutiones Linguae Tocharicae, Pars I: Thesaurus Linguae Tocharicae Dialecti A.George S. Lane & Pavel Poucha - 1956 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 76 (3):190.
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  19.  6
    Placing Plato in the History of Liberty.Melissa Lane - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (6):702-718.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explores and reevaluates the place of Plato in the history of liberty. In the first half, reevaluating the view that he invents a concept of ‘positive liberty’ in the Republic, I argue for two claims: that he does not do so, insofar as this is not the way that virtuous psychological self-mastery in the Republic is understood, and that the Republic works primarily with the inverse concept of slavery, relying on entrenched Greek ideas about the badness of the (...)
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  20.  35
    II—Plato on the Value of Knowledge in Ruling.Melissa Lane - 2018 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 92 (1):49-67.
    This paper transposes for evaluation in relation to the concerns of Plato’s Politicus a claim developed by Verity Harte in the context of his Philebus, that ‘external imposition of a practical aim would in some way corrupt paideutic [philosophical] knowledge’. I argue that the Politicus provides a case for which the Philebus distinction may not allow: ruling, or statecraft, as embodying a form of knowledge that can be answerable to practical norms in a way that does not necessarily subordinate or (...)
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  21. Das Verstehen: Grundzüge Einer Geschichte der Hermeneutischen Theorie Im 19. Jahrhundert. I. Die Grossen Systeme. [REVIEW]Lane Cooper - 1929 - Philosophical Review 38 (3):282-284.
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  22.  21
    “A Sharply Drawn Horizon”: Peirce and Other Correspondence Theorists.Robert Lane - 2018 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 54 (3):395.
    ... I was many years ago led to define "real" as meaning being such as it is, no matter how you, or, I, or any man or definite collection of men may think it to be; where I use the long and awkward phrase in order to avoid all appearance of meaning independently of human thought. For obviously, nothing that I or anybody ever can mean can be independent of human thought. That is real which men would eventually and finally (...)
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  23. Persons, Signs, Animals: A Peircean Account of Personhood.Robert Lane - 2009 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):pp. 1-26.
    In this essay I describe two of the accounts that Peirce provides of personhood: the semiotic account, on which a person is a sequence of thought-signs, and the naturalistic account, on which a person is an animal. I then argue that these disparate accounts can be reconciled into a plausible view on which persons are numerically distinct entities that are nevertheless continuous with each other in an important way. This view would be agreeable to Peirce in some respects, as it (...)
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  24.  16
    William Lane Craig’s Nominalism, Essences, and Implications for Our Knowledge of Reality.R. Scott Smith - 2013 - Philosophia Christi 15 (2):365-382.
    William Lane Craig has claimed that Platonism is incompatible theologically with Christian theism in that it undermines God’s aseity. He develops three main objections to Platonism, as well as his own nominalist theory of reference, for which he draws from philosophy of language. However, I rebut his arguments. I argue that, unlike on Platonism, his view will not preserve a real essence of intentionality. Without that, his view undermines our abilities to know reality. As an implication, I also will (...)
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  25. Mac Lane, Bourbaki, and Adjoints: A Heteromorphic Retrospective.David Ellerman - manuscript
    Saunders Mac Lane famously remarked that "Bourbaki just missed" formulating adjoints in a 1948 appendix (written no doubt by Pierre Samuel) to an early draft of Algebre--which then had to wait until Daniel Kan's 1958 paper on adjoint functors. But Mac Lane was using the orthodox treatment of adjoints that only contemplates the object-to-object morphisms within a category, i.e., homomorphisms. When Samuel's treatment is reconsidered in view of the treatment of adjoints using heteromorphisms or hets (object-to-object morphisms between (...)
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  26. Pyrrhonism and Protagoreanism: Catching Sextus Out?Verity Harte & Melissa Lane - 1999 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 2.
    Prima facie, the sceptical procedure described in Sextus Empiricus' Outlines of Pyrrhonism I is committed to a gap between appearance and reality, that is, to the possibility that reality is other than it appears. But the Pyrrhonist is keen to avoid having commitments. In this paper, we consider whether the Pyrrhonist is indeed so committed; what, more precisely, the commitment might be; and whether it is the kind of commitment which can be dislodged in the way the Pyrrhonist advertises as (...)
     
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  27.  6
    Consiglio dei Dieci, Deliberazioni miste, registri I-II . Ferruccio ZagoCassiere della Bolla Ducale, Grazie, Novus Liber . Elena Favaro.Frederic C. Lane - 1966 - Speculum 41 (2):383-384.
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  28.  84
    States of Nature, Epistemic and Political.Melissa Lane - 1999 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (2):211–224.
    The paper asks what is living in political state-of-nature approaches, and answers by way of considering recent epistemic uses of state-of-nature arguments. Using Edward Craig's idea that a concept of knowledge can be explicated from the need for good informants, I argue that a concept of authority can be explicated from a parallel need for good practical informants. But this need not justify rule of a Platonic elite. Practically relevant epistemic advantages are more likely to be secured by the political (...)
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  29.  94
    The Final Incapacity: Peirce on Intuition and the Continuity of Mind and Matter, Part II.Robert Lane - 2011 - Cognitio 12 (2):237-256.
    This is the second of two papers that examine Charles Peirce’s denial that human beings have a faculty of intuition. In the first paper, I argued that in its metaphysical aspect, Peirce’s denial of intuition amounts to the doctrine that there is no determinate boundary between the internal world of the cognizing subject and the external world that the subject cognizes.In the present paper, I argue that, properly understood, the “objective idealism” of Peirce’s 1890s cosmological series is a more general (...)
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  30.  5
    Aristotle and Law: The Politics of Nomos by George Duke.Melissa Lane - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):329-330.
    In this excellent book, drawing on previously published articles, George Duke gathers the scattered threads of Aristotle's discussions of law while defending clear stances in the various philosophical debates they have engendered. The book works within Aristotelian methodology and metaphysics, developing the view that a politeia should be understood as a formal cause that is worked out in terms of the successive definitions offered in book III of Politics. Building on studies of the evolution of the meaning of nomos and (...)
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  31. The Ethics of False Belief.Timothy Lane - 2010 - EurAmerica 40 (3):591-633.
    According to Allen Wood’s “procedural principle” we should believe only that which can be justified by evidence, and nothing more. He argues that holding beliefs which are not justified by evidence diminishes our self-respect and corrupts us, both individually and collectively. Wood’s normative and descriptive views as regards belief are of a piece with the received view which holds that beliefs aim at the truth. This view I refer to as the Truth-Tracking View (TTV). I first present a modest version (...)
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  32.  16
    Synechistic Bioethics: A Peircean View Of The Moral Status Of Pre-Birth Humans.Robert Lane - 2006 - Contemporary Pragmatism 3 (2):151-170.
    I provide an account of the moral status of pre-birth humans that integrates ideas from Charles Peirce, including: synechism, the idea that "all that exists is continuous"; the reality of "Seconds," independently existing individual entities; and Peirce's pragmatic conceptions of truth and reality. This account implies that destroying a pre-birth human is determinately moral very soon after conception and determinately immoral very late in pregnancy. But it also implies that during much of gestation, destroying a pre-birth human is of indeterminate (...)
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  33.  13
    Early Socratic DialoguesIonLachesLysis, CharmidesHippias Major, Hippias Minor, EuthydemusLettres. [REVIEW]C. J. Rowe, Plato, T. J. Saunders, I. Lane, D. Watt, R. Waterfield & L. Brisson - 1990 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 110:224-225.
  34.  50
    On Peirce’s Early Realism.Robert Lane - 2004 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 40 (4):575 - 605.
    It is well known that C. S. Peirce eventually accepted an "extreme scholastic realism" about "generals" and "vagues." But it has been a subject of debate among Peirce scholars whether he was a nominalist early on. In particular, it remains unsettled whether Peirce's earliest position regarding generals was one of antirealism or whether he was a realist about generals from the very beginning. In this essay I argue that despite first appearances, the textual evidence does not support the claim that (...)
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  35. Is Depressive Rumination Rational?Timothy Lane & Georg Northoff - 2016 - In T. W. Hung & T. J. Lane (eds.), Rationality: Constraints and Contexts. Oxford, UK: Elsevier. pp. 121-145.
    Most mental disorders affect only a small segment of the population. On the reasonable assumption that minds or brains are prone to occasional malfunction, these disorders do not seem to pose distinctive explanatory problems. Depression, however, because it is so prevalent and costly, poses a conundrum that some try to explain by characterizing it as an adaptation—a trait that exists because it performed fitness-enhancing functions in ancestral populations. Heretofore, proposed evolutionary explanations of depression did not focus on thought processes; instead, (...)
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  36.  9
    Studies in the Transposition of Learning by Children. I. Relative Vs. Absolute Response as a Function of Amount of Training. [REVIEW]T. A. Jackson, E. Stonex, E. Lane & K. Dominguez - 1938 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (6):578.
  37.  16
    Actes du XI• Congres International d'Archeologie Chretienne, Lyon, Vienne, Grenoble, Geneve Et Aoste (21-28 Septembre 1986),(Studi di Antichita Cristiana XLI; Collection de I'Ecole Fran~ Aise de Rome 123), Voi. I. [REVIEW]Jochen Brunow, Schreiben fur den Film, Carsten Colpe, Das Siegel der Propheten, William Lane Craig, Divine Foreknowledge & Human Freedom - 1991 - Bijdragen, Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie En Theologie 52 (2):235.
  38.  46
    Peirce’s ‘Entanglement’ with the Principles of Excluded Middle and Contradiction.Robert Lane - 1997 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (3):680 - 703.
    Charles Peirce claimed that "anything is general in so far as the principle of excluded middle does not apply to it and is vague in so far as the principle of contradiction does not apply to it." This seems to imply that general propositions are neither true nor false and that vague propositions are both true and false. But this is not the case. I argue that Peirce's claim was intended to underscore relatively simple facts about quantification and negation, and (...)
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  39. Barrett, Justin L.(2004) Why Would Anyone Believe in God? Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc. $19.95, 160 Pp. Beckwith, Francis J., William Lane Craig and JP Moreland (2004) To Everyone an Answer: A Case for the Christian Worldview. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, $29.00, 396 Pp. [REVIEW]John Dillon, Lloyd P. Gerson, Franklin I. Gamwell, Sohail H. Hashmi, Steven P. Lee, Ruth Illman, Paul D. Janz, John Lachs, D. Micah Hester & Nancy K. Levene - 2005 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 57:217-218.
     
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  40. Temporal Necessity; Hard Facts/Soft Facts.William Lane Craig - 1986 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):65 - 91.
    In conclusion, then, the notion of temporal necessity is certainly queer and perhaps a misnomer. It really has little to do with temporality per se and everything to do with counterfactual openness or closedness. We have seen that the future is as unalterable as the past, but that this purely logical truth is not antithetical to freedom or contingency. Moreover, we have found certain past facts are counterfactually open in that were future events or actualities to be other than they (...)
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  41.  13
    Synechistic Bioethics: How a Peircean Views the Abortion Debate.Robert Lane - 2006 - Contemporary Pragmatism 3 (2):151-170.
    I provide an account of the moral status of pre-birth humans that integrates ideas from Charles Peirce, including: synechism, the idea that "all that exists is continuous"; the reality of "Seconds," independently existing individual entities; and Peirce's pragmatic conceptions of truth and reality. This account implies that destroying a pre-birth human is determinately moral very soon after conception and determinately immoral very late in pregnancy. But it also implies that during much of gestation, destroying a pre-birth human is of indeterminate (...)
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  42. Graham Oppy on the Kalam Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):303-330.
    Graham Oppy has emerged as one of the kalam cosmological argument’s most formidable opponents. He rejects all four of the arguments drawn from metaphysics and physics for the second premiss that the universe began to exist. He also thinks that we have no good reason to accept the first premiss that everything that begins to exist has a cause. In this response, I hope to show that the kalam cosmological argument is, in fact, considerably stronger than Oppy claims, surviving even (...)
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  43.  24
    Graham Oppy on the Kalām Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1993 - Sophia 32 (1):1-11.
    In conclusion, then, I think that the refutations proffered by Mackie of thekalām cosmological argument were all too quick and easy. Nor do I think Oppy has succeeded in rehabilitating those refutations.
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  44.  65
    Why Are Platonists so Insouciant?William Lane Craig - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (2):213-229.
    Some platonists truly agonize over the ontological commitments which their platonism demands of them. Peter van Inwagen, for example, confesses candidly, I am happy to admit that I am uneasy about believing in the existence of ???causally irrelevant??? objects. The fact that abstract objects, if they exist, can be neither causes or [ sic ] effects is one of the many features of abstract objects that make nominalism so attractive. I should very much like to be a nominalist, but I (...)
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  45.  99
    Cochlear Implants and the Claims of Culture? A Response to Lane and Grodin.Dena S. Davis - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (3):253-258.
    : Because I reject the notion that physical characteristics constitute cultural membership, I argue that, even if the claim were persuasive that deafness is a culture rather than a disability, there is no reason to fault hearing parents who choose cochlear implants for their deaf children.
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  46. Does the Problem of Material Constitution Illuminate the Doctrine of the Trinity?William Lane Craig - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):77-86.
    Michael Rea and Jeffery Brower have offered a provocative new model of the Trinity on the analogy of the Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. Just as a fist and a hand can be distinct entities composed of a common matter and yet numerically the same object, so the persons of the Trinity can be distinct entities (persons) composed of a common "matter" (the divine essence) and yet numerically the same object (God). I express doubts about the degree (...)
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  47.  73
    On Hasker’s Defense of Anti-Molinism.William Lane Craig - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (2):236-240.
    In a pair of recent articles, William Hasker has attempted to defend Robert Adams’s new anti-Molinist argument. But I argue that the sense of explanatory priority operative in the argument is either equivocal or, if a univocal sense can be given to it, it is either so generic that we should have to deny its transitivity or so weak that it would not be incompatible with human freedom.
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  48.  8
    Review of Harte and Lane, Eds., Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2014 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:48.
    Malcolm Schofield, the honorand of this Festschrift, needs no introduction to scholars working in classics and ancient philosophy. The volume includes a six and a half page bibliography of his works over the last 30 years, and his books, translations, edited collections, and articles range over all subsections and periods of ancient philosophy, from the pre-Socratics through Hellenistic Greek and Roman philosophy. His two most recent books--<i>Plato: Political Philosophy</i> (Oxford, 2006) and an edited volume of Plato translations (Cambridge, 2010)--have focused (...)
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  49.  46
    Professor Mackie and the KalĀm Cosmological Argument.William Lane Craig - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (3):367-375.
    Like David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion , J. L. Mackie's most potent blast against the rationality of belief in God, his The Miracle of Theism , appeared after his death. The book is a broadside against not only the traditional arguments for God's existence, such as the onto-, cosmo-, and teleological arguments, but also against proofs from consciousness, miracles, the idea of God, and so forth, and against the validity of religious experience and faith without reason, and it presents (...)
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  50.  48
    Rejoinder to William Lane Craig.David B. Myers - 2003 - Religious Studies 39 (4):427-430.
    While I may have misunderstood certain points in Craig's Molinist theodicy, a careful reading of my article will show that Craig is incorrect in his claim that I have failed to evaluate his proposal on the basis of its asserted standard: plausibility. The heart of my argument is that Craig's theodicy is implausible because it fails to provide a credible explanation of the culpability of all non-believers. In this rejoinder I try to show (1) why an evidentialist exoneration of reflective (...)
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