Results for 'I. S. Danilenko'

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  1.  37
    C. I. Lewis’s Theory of Meaning and Theory of Value. [REVIEW]B. R. S. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (1):158-158.
    This examination of C. I. Lewis’s theory of meaning and theory of value argues that while Lewis’s own statement of the connection between them is inadequate, a way can be shown which allows for a connection between the two. The amount of space devoted to this endeavor is even briefer than the length of the book indicates, for the last nineteen pages consist of an appendix on Quine’s theory of meaning, and there are numbered but blank pages between chapters. The (...)
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  2.  17
    Martin Buber's Ontology: An Analysis of "I and Thou.". [REVIEW]J. B. S. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (1):143-144.
    Wood informs the reader that Buber rejected "isms," hard and fast rules and principles, and systems, but he goes on to systematize Buber's thought nonetheless. The result is often enlightening. I and Thou, which Wood considers the central work of the philosopher's thought, is finely broken down and analyzed in its component parts. In this manner it is less formidable to the uninitiated, and the reader who is puzzled by a particular passage can find in Wood's book an authoritative, well-researched (...)
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  3. Russkie Filosofy o Voĭne: F.M. Dostoevskiĭ, Vl.S. Solovʹev, N.A. Berdi͡aev, S.N. Bulgakov, E.N. Trubet͡skoĭ, S.L. Frank, V.F. Ėrn. [REVIEW]I. S. Danilenko (ed.) - 2005 - Kuchkovo Pole.
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  4.  6
    The Cambridge Ancient History. Edited by J. B. Bury, S. A. Cook, and F. E. Adcock. Vol. I. Egypt and Babylonia to 1580 B.C. Pp. Xxii + 704, 13 Maps and Plans. Cambridge: University Press, 1923. 35s. [REVIEW]C. S. - 1923 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 43 (2):212-213.
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  5.  89
    I. S. Kon. Introduction to Sexology.I. S. Andreeva - 1990 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):86-94.
    Introduction to Sexology [Vvedenie v seksologiiu] by I. S. Kon has finally been published after having made the rounds of publishing houses for many years. This is the first Soviet publication devoted to a description and an analysis of the genesis, development, and state of a new branch of scientific knowledge about man-sexology-which affects every one of us. To be sure, General Sexual Pathology [Obshchaia seksopatologiia], a textbook for physicians edited by G. S. Vasil'chenko, which came out in 1977, has (...)
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  6. On the Verge of Centuries: A Philosophical Rethinking of I.S. Turgenev.I. E. Koznova - 2019 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 62 (3):150-159.
    On World Philosophy Day, November 15, 2018, the Institute of Philosophy of the Russian Academy of Sciences organized the international conference on the Russian classic writer I.S. Turgenev. During the plenary and two breakout sessions, speeches were given by philosophers, cultural researchers, historians ofRussia,USA,Germany,Austria. The conference’s attitude to the consideration of the multifaceted heritage of the great Russian writer made it possible to highlight in the modern historical and cultural context many aspects of Turgenev’s work, to rethink stereotypes existing among (...)
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  7. T'ang Chün-I's Philosophy of Love.Cheung Chan-fai - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (2):257-271.
    T'ang Chün-i's early work Ai-ching chih fu-yin (Gospel of love) has been much neglected by T'ang scholars. This essay argues that this text is not a caprice, and that it marks an important stage in T'ang's life and studies. Furthermore, in the history of Chinese philosophy, it is probably the first book ever written on the philosophy of love.
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  8.  6
    Stoickie pojęcie oznaki według I. Dąmbskiej a C.S. Peirce'a koncepcja znaczenia.Piotr Janik - 2009 - In Jerzy Perzanowski & Piotr Janik (eds.), Rozum-Serce-Smak. Ignatianum, Wydawnictwo WAM. pp. 119-130.
    Publikacja składa się z dwu zasadniczych części, z których pierwsza zawiera rozprawy poświęcone twórczości Izydory Dąmbskiej, zaś druga - jej pracy własne, publikowane poprzednio w „Kwartalniku Filozoficznym". Tom otwiera wiersz Zbigniewa Herberta „Potęga smaku" dedykowany przez poetę tej wybitnej uczonej, który to utwór dobrze oddaje, w warstwie ideowej, wartości bliskie Dąmbskiej.
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  9.  14
    Al-Shāfi’Ī’s Position on Analogical Reasoning in Islamic Criminal Law: Jurists Debates and Human Rights Implications.Luqman Zakariyah - 2017 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 30 (2):301-319.
    Al-Shāfi’ī has been unreservedly credited as one of the designers, if not the “master architect,” of uṣūl al-fiqh. His most important scholarly work, Al-Risālah, clearly demonstrates his cognitive creativity in this field. One of the methodologies for the decision of cases under Islamic law that Al-Shāfi’ī championed is qiyās, which he equated with ijtihād. His balanced approach invites further enquiry into the extensive use of qiyās in general and in criminal law in particular. The extent to which qiyās can be (...)
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  10.  13
    I. S. KON, "Die Geschichtsphilosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts. Kritischer Abriss". [REVIEW]Geoffrey Barraclough & I. S. Kon - 1967 - History and Theory 6 (2):230.
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  11. The Cultural and Philosophical Meaning of the Motif of Loneliness: The Personality and Creative Work of I.S. Turgenev.Tatiana Zlotnikova - 2018 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 7:96-108.
    The article deals with the little-studied but actual problem of loneliness of an outstanding creative personality as a consequence of stereotypical understanding of his works and activity. The cultural and philosophical meaning of Ivan Turgenev’s motif of loneliness is that he was a lone creator, recognized by Russian critics and historians of literature only in the context of the activities of other recognized great writers: Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov. The problem of loneliness is revealed through the paradoxical statement by (...)
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  12. Why It Doesn’T Matter I’M Not Insane: Descartes’s Madness Doubt in Focus.Andrew Russo - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):157-165.
    Harry Frankfurt has argued that Descartes’s madness doubt in the First Meditation is importantly different from his dreaming doubt. The madness doubt does not provide a reason for doubting the senses since were the meditator to suppose he was mad his ability to successfully complete the philosophical investigation he sets for himself in the first few pages of the Meditations would be undermined. I argue that Frankfurt’s interpretation of Descartes’s madness doubt is mistaken and that it should be understood as (...)
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  13.  25
    Ai Ssu-ch'I's Philosophy.Ignatius J. H. Ts'ao - 1972 - Studies in East European Thought 12 (3):231-244.
    In Ai Ssu-ch'i is exemplified and substantiated the Soviet influence on the official definition of philosophy in the history of Communist Party of China, i.e., the assertion about and the method for knowledge of the world. Such a philosophical knowledge has as its formal object the most fundamental laws of the universe.In order to acquire such a genuine philosophical knowledge, one needs a desire to change the world and a proletarian point of view. For only by aiming at changing the (...)
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  14.  8
    How Can Aesthetics Be Materialistic and Dialectic? Comments on Comrade Ts'ai I's Point of View in Aesthetics.Chu Kuang-Ch'ien - 1974 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 6 (2):4-18.
    Comrade Huang Yüeh-mien's article, "A Discussion of the Aesthetics of the Wealthy" [Lun shih-li che ti mei-hsüeh], which criticized my point of view in aesthetics, was published later than my self-criticism. Before he published it, he had presented it at a discussion meeting at Peking Teachers College. He let me read it only after he had submitted it to Literature [Wen-i pao] for publication. I wrote to the editor of Literature, Comrade K'ang Cho, saying that basically I accepted his criticisms (...)
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  15. An Intrinsic Theory of Quantum Mechanics: Progress in Field's Nominalistic Program, Part I.Eddy Keming Chen - manuscript
    In this paper, I introduce an intrinsic account of the quantum state. This account contains three desirable features that the standard platonistic account lacks: (1) it does not refer to any abstract mathematical objects such as complex numbers, (2) it is independent of the usual arbitrary conventions in the wave function representation, and (3) it explains why the quantum state has its amplitude and phase degrees of freedom. -/- Consequently, this account extends Hartry Field’s program outlined in Science Without Numbers (...)
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  16.  40
    The Argument From Meaning to God In Buber’s I and Thou.Steven G. Smith - 1987 - International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):347-363.
    Buber's assertions about the relation between the self (I) and God (the Eternal You) amount to an "argument" which means reasonably to bring its audience to awareness of God. This reasoning is better understood and evaluated if it is presented in a more conventionally argumentative form than Buber gave it. The key premises are: 1) Buber's account of I-You saying as a general theory of meaning and criterion of reality, and 2) Buber's claim that You-saying in encounters with finite beings (...)
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  17. I and Tao: Martin Buber's Encounter with Chuang Tzu.Robert E. Allinson & Jonathan R. Herman - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (3):529.
    This review confirms Herman’s work as a praiseworthy contribution to East-West and comparative philosophical literature. Due credit is given to Herman for providing English readers with access to Buber’s commentary on, a personal translation of, the Chuang-Tzu; Herman’s insight into the later influence of I and Thou on Buber’s understanding of Chuang-Tzu and Taoism is also appropriately commended. In latter half of this review, constructive criticisms of Herman’s work are put forward, such as formatting inconsistencies, a tendency toward verbosity and (...)
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  18.  31
    Hans Reichenbach's and C.I. Lewis's Kantian Philosophies of Science.Paul L. Franco - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    Recent work in the history of philosophy of science details the Kantianism of philosophers often thought opposed to one another, e.g., Hans Reichenbach, C.I. Lewis, Rudolf Carnap, and Thomas Kuhn. Historians of philosophy of science in the last two decades have been particularly interested in the Kantianism of Reichenbach, Carnap, and Kuhn, and more recently, of Lewis. While recent historical work focuses on recovering the threatened-to-be-forgotten Kantian themes of early twentieth-century philosophy of science, we should not elide the differences between (...)
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  19. Mind as Conceptual Structure: On Ethical Theory of C. I. Lewis’s Conceptual Pragmatism.Cheongho Lee - 2017 - Journal of Ethics 1 (113):73-89.
    Clarence I. Lewis (1883-1964) delineated the structure of mind based on his “conceptual pragmatism.” Human mind grounds itself on the ongoing dynamic interaction of relational processes, which is essentially mediated and structural. Lewis’s pragmatism anchors itself on the theory of knowledge that has the triadic structure of the given or immediate data, interpretation, and the concept. Lewis takes the a priori given as a starting point of meaningful experience. The interpretative work of mind is the mediator of the a priori (...)
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  20.  39
    Belief and Its Neutralization: Husserl’s System of Phenomenology in Ideas I.Marcus Brainard - 2002 - State University of New York Press.
    Presenting the first step-by-step commentary on Husserl’s Ideas I, Marcus Brainard’s Belief and Its Neutralization provides an introduction not only to this central work, but also to the whole of transcendental phenomenology. Brainard offers a clear and lively account of each key element in Ideas I, along with a novel reading of Husserl, one which may well cause scholars to reconsider many long-standing views on his thought, especially on the role of belief, the effect and scope of the epoché, and (...)
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  21. Yogic Mindfulness: Hariharānanda Āraṇya’s Quasi-Buddhistic Interpretation of Smṛti in Patañjali’s Yogasūtra I.20.Ayon Maharaj - 2013 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (1):57-78.
    This paper examines Swami Hariharānanda Āraṇya’s unique interpretation of smṛti as “mindfulness” (samanaskatā) in Patañjali’s Yogasūtra I.20. Focusing on his extended commentary on Yogasūtra I.20 in his Bengali magnum opus, the Pātañjaljogdarśan (1911), I argue that his interpretation of smṛti is quasi-Buddhistic. On the one hand, Hariharānanda’s conception of smṛti as mindfulness resonates strongly with some of the views on smṛti advanced in classic Buddhist texts such as the Satipaṭṭhānasutta and Buddaghośa’s Papañcasūdanī. On the other hand, he also builds into (...)
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  22.  39
    The Nature of the ‘I Think’: Comments on Chapter 11 of Kant's Thinker.Falk Wunderlich - 2014 - Kantian Review 19 (1):143-148.
    The article deals with Kant's theory of the self in Patricia Kitcher's Kant's Thinker in three respects: (1) I argue that it is doubtful whether accompanying representations with the as such yields a principle for the categories since it does not require any strong kind of connection between them. (2) I discuss textual evidence for and against Kitcher's attempt to make sense of Kant's claim that the requires the continued existence of cognizers per se. (3) I ask whether Kitcher's understanding (...)
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  23. Can We Trust Our Memories? C. I. Lewis's Coherence Argument.T. Shogenji & E. Olsson - 2004 - Synthese 142 (1):21-41.
    In this paper we examine C. I. Lewis's view on the roleof coherence – what he calls ''congruence'' – in thejustification of beliefs based on memory ortestimony. Lewis has two main theses on the subject. His negativethesis states that coherence of independent items ofevidence has no impact on the probability of a conclusionunless each item has some credibility of its own. Thepositive thesis says, roughly speaking, that coherenceof independently obtained items of evidence – such asconverging memories or testimonies – raises (...)
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  24.  32
    What Am I? Descartes’s Various Conceptions of Self.Colin Chamberlain - forthcoming - Journal of Modern Philosophy.
    In the Meditations and related texts from the early 1640s, Descartes argues that the self can be correctly considered as either a mind or a human being, and that the self’s properties vary accordingly. For example, the self is simple considered as a mind, whereas the self is composite considered as a human being. Someone might object that it is unclear how merely considering the self in different ways blocks the conclusion that a single subject of predication—the self—is both simple (...)
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  25. Nølebegreber I Søen Kierkegaards Tækning.Gregor Malantschuk, Grethe Kjæ & Paul Müller - 1993
     
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  26. Indf Relse I s Ren Kierkegaards Forfatterskab.Gregor Malantschuk - 1953 - Munksgaard.
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  27. Frihed Og Eksistens Studier I Søen Kierkegaards Tækning.Gregor Malantschuk, Niels Jøgen Cappeløn & Paul Müller - 1980
     
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  28. Why Can’T I Change Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony?David Friedell - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Musical works change. Bruckner revised his Eighth Symphony. Ella Fitzgerald and many other artists have made it acceptable to sing the jazz standard “All the Things You Are” without its original verse. If we accept that musical works genuinely change in these ways, a puzzle arises: why can’t I change Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony? More generally, why are some individuals in a privileged position when it comes to changing musical works and other artifacts, such as novels, films, and games? I give (...)
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  29. The Mind's "I". [REVIEW]Colin McLear - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):255-265.
  30. Christopher Marlowe's Edward The Second-A Critical Evaluation, The Way I Do.Rituparna Ray Chaudhuri - 2016 - @Article{Chaudhuri2016christopher, Title={Christopher Marlowe's Edward The Second-A Critical Evaluation, The Way I Do.}, Author={Chaudhuri, Rituparna Ray}, Year={2016}.
    “Marlowe wrote Edward The Second in 1590. He found a suitable tragic theme in the Holinshed’s account of Edward II’s reign though it was not a promising dramatic material from the chronological point of view as the events were disjointed and uninspiring disastrous. Improper coordinates of the sources has left its mark on Marlowe’s play, nevertheless, this is his most finished and satisfactory of plays…Edward The Second can surely be regarded as Marlowe’s finest technical achievement.” (Edited, Dr. S. Sen…)[http://philpapers.org/profile/112741].
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  31.  66
    Plato's Simile of Light. Part I. The Similes of The Sun and The Line.A. S. Ferguson - 1921 - Classical Quarterly 15 (3-4):131-.
    No part ot Plato's writings has been more debated than the three similes in Books VI.-VII. of the Republic, and still there is a diversity of opinion about their meaning. I believe that most of these difficulties arise from certain assumptions about their purpose which need revision. The current view applies the Cave to the Line, as Plato seems to direct, and this application, which is itself attended by considerable difficulties, leads to an assimilation of the two figures till they (...)
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  32.  27
    Plato's Simile of Light. Part I. The Similes of The Sun and The Line.A. S. Ferguson - 1921 - Classical Quarterly 15 (3-4):131-152.
    No part ot Plato's writings has been more debated than the three similes in Books VI.-VII. of the Republic, and still there is a diversity of opinion about their meaning. I believe that most of these difficulties arise from certain assumptions about their purpose which need revision. The current view applies the Cave to the Line, as Plato seems to direct, and this application, which is itself attended by considerable difficulties, leads to an assimilation of the two figures till they (...)
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  33. Hegel's Ladder: Volume I: The Pilgrimage of Reason. Volume Ii: The Odyssey of Spirit.H. S. Harris - 1997 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    A two-volume set. Print edition available in cloth only. Awarded the Nicholas Hoare/Renaud-Bray Canadian Philosophical Association Book Prize, 2001 From the Preface: _Hegel's Ladder_ aspires to be... a ‘literal commentary’ on _Die Phänomenologie des Geistes_.... It was the conscious goal of my thirty-year struggle with Hegel to write an explanatory commentary on this book; and with its completion I regard my own ‘working’ career as concluded.... The prevailing habit of commentators... is founded on the general consensus of opinion that whatever (...)
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  34. Epistemic Justification and Husserl's Phenomenology of Reason in Ideas I.Carlos Sanchez - 2010 - In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
    ...In what follows I lay out Husserl's theory of epistemic justification as he sketches it in Part IV of 'Ideas 1', especially in the section he appropriately titles the "Phenomenology of Reason," understood here to present a phenomenological analysis of how reason is given, namely, how reason manifests itself in conscious life. My claim is that Husserl's "phenomenology of reason," by clarifying the ways in which the "legitimizations of reason" take place can be ultimately understood as a theory of epistemic (...)
     
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  35. I—Miranda Fricker: The Relativism of Blame and Williams's Relativism of Distance.Miranda Fricker - 2010 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):151-177.
    Bernard Williams is a sceptic about the objectivity of moral value, embracing instead a qualified moral relativism—the ‘relativism of distance’. His attitude to blame too is in part sceptical. I will argue that the relativism of distance is unconvincing, even incoherent; but also that it is detachable from the rest of Williams's moral philosophy. I will then go on to propose an entirely localized thesis I call the relativism of blame, which says that when an agent's moral shortcomings by our (...)
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  36.  47
    Kant’s “I Think” and the Agential Approach to Self-Knowledge.Houston Smit - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (7):980-1011.
    ABSTRACTThis paper relates Kant’s account of pure apperception to the agential approach to self-knowledge. It argues that his famous claim ‘The I think must be able to accompany all of my represent...
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  37.  70
    Aristotle’s Theory of Language in the Light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, causes and elements (...)
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  38. On Nietzsche’s Criticism Towards Common Sense Realism in Human, All Too Human I, 11.Pietro Gori - 2017 - Philosophical Readings 9 (3):207-213.
    The paper explores Nietzsche's observations on language in Human, All Too Human I, 11; reflects on the anti-realist position that Nietzsche defends in that aphorism; and focuses on the role she plays in his later investigation on Western culture and its anthropology. As will be argued, Nietzsche's criticism towards common sense realism is consistent with some pragmatist epistemologies developed during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century. This treat of " timeliness " does not limit Nietzsche's originality on the topic. In fact, (...)
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  39. I Love My Children: Am I Racist? On the Wish to Be Biologically Related to One’s Children.Ezio Di Nucci - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):814-816.
    Is the wish to be biologically related to your children legitimate? Here, I respond to an argument in support of a negative answer to this question according to which a preference towards having children one is biologically related to is analogous to a preference towards associating with members of one’s own race. I reject this analogy, mainly on the grounds that only the latter constitutes discrimination; still, I conclude that indeed a preference towards children one is biologically related to is (...)
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  40.  15
    I S.Steven F. Savitt - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 50:19-24.
    Richard Arthur and I proposed that the present in Minkowski spacetime should be thought of as a small causal diamond. That is, given two timelike separated events p and q, with p earlier than q, they suggested that the present is the set I+ ∩ I-. Mauro Dorato presents three criticisms of this proposal. I rebut all three and then offer two more plausible criticisms of the Arthur/Savitt proposal. I argue that these criticisms also fail.
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  41.  68
    The 'I's Have It: Nietzsche on Subjectivity.Robert Guay - 2006 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (3):218 – 241.
    This paper identifies recent attributions to Nietzsche of skeptical arguments about the subject in its theoretical and practical capacities and argues that they are wrong. Although Nietzsche does criticize the picture of the subject as a unity that exerts influence in the world from outside it, he does so in order to replace it with a richer, more complex model of subjectivity. The skeptical arguments attributed to Nietzsche attempt to assimilate features of subjectivity to some alternative, purportedly more familiar explanatory (...)
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  42. I See Dead People: Disembodied Souls and Aquinas’s ‘Two-Person’ Problem.Christina Van Dyke - 2014 - In Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy. pp. 25-45.
    Aquinas’s account of the human soul is the key to his theory of human nature. The soul’s nature as the substantial form of the human body appears at times to be in tension with its nature as immaterial intellect, however, and nowhere is this tension more evident than in Aquinas’s discussion of the ‘separated’ soul. In this paper I use the Biblical story of the rich man and Lazarus (which Aquinas took to involve actual separated souls) to highlight what I (...)
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  43. Se E I N G a N D V I S U a L I Z I N G : I T ' S N O T W H a T y O U T H I N K'.Zenon Pylyshyn - unknown
    6. Seeing With the Mind ’ s Eye 1 : The Puzzle of Mental Imagery 6. 1 What is the puzzle about mental imagery? 6. 2 Content, form and substance of representations 6. 3 What is responsible for the pattern of results obtained in imagery studies?
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  44.  81
    I—Hegel's Critique of Kant.Stephen Houlgate - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):21-41.
    In this essay I argue that Hegel criticizes Kant for failing to carry out a thorough critique of the categories of thought. In Hegel's view, Kant merely limits the validity of the categories to objects of possible experience, but he does not challenge the way in which the ‘understanding’ conceives of those categories and other concepts. Indeed, for Hegel, Kant's limitation of the validity of the categories itself presupposes the sharp distinctions, drawn by understanding, between concepts such as ‘form’ and (...)
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  45.  11
    History of Persia Under Qājār Rule: Translated From the Persian of Hasan-E Fasā'i's Fārsnāma-Ye NāṣeriHistory of Persia Under Qajar Rule: Translated From the Persian of Hasan-E Fasa'i's Farsnama-Ye Naseri.Gene R. Garthwaite, Heribert Busse, Hasan-E. Fasā'I' & Hasan-E. Fasa'I' - 1974 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 94 (2):248.
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  46.  10
    The Domesday Geography of Midland England. H. C. Darby, I. B. TerrettThe Domesday Geography of South-East England. H. C. Darby, E. M. J. CampbellThe Domesday Geography of Northern England. H. C. Darby, I. S. Maxwell. [REVIEW]Robert S. Hoyt - 1964 - Speculum 39 (3):513-515.
  47.  9
    The Date of Henry I's Charter to London.J. S. P. Tatlock - 1936 - Speculum 11 (4):461-469.
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  48.  8
    Islamic Jurisprudence: Shāfi'ī's RisālaIslamic Jurisprudence: Shafi'i's Risala.Khalil I. Semaan & Majid Khadduri - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (3):423.
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  49.  10
    Ars in Their ‘I's: Authority and Authorship in Graeco-Roman Visual Culture1.Michael Squire - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 357.
    This chapter investigates the hermeneutics of the signature in Greek and Roman visual culture. Ancient artists, it argues, exploited artistic agency as a meaning-making mechanism. The chapter focusses on the common practice of craftsmen working under the name of a more celebrated artist, taking as a particular case study the Iliac tablets. Created in the first century AD, several associate themselves with the ‘Theodorean techne’. This chapter argues that this is a form of pseudonymity: the creator wished to imbue his (...)
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    Monogamy, Polygamy and the True State: James I's Rhetoric of Empire.A. McLaren - 2004 - History of Political Thought 25 (3):446-480.
    The article looks again at the English debate over Anglo-Scottish union in the period 1603 to 1607. It reconstructs what marriage meant to contemporaries, as sociocultural practice as well as political model. It argues that Englishmen's attention to their local circumstances -- sui generis since the Henrician reformation -- sank the union project. The debate also promoted a distrust of blood-right kingship that was crucial to its abolition a generation later. The body of the paper is designed as a case (...)
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