Results for 'Ian Barrow'

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  1.  3
    Radical Education: A Critique of Freeschooling and Deschooling.Ian Lister & Robin Barrow - 1979 - British Journal of Educational Studies 27 (3):259.
  2.  46
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Werner Menski, Carl Olson, William Cenkner, Anne E. Monius, Sarah Hodges, Jeffrey J. Kripal, Carol Salomon, Deepak Sarma, William Cenkner, John E. Cort, Peter A. Huff, Joseph A. Bracken, Larry D. Shinn, Jonathan S. Walters, Ellison Banks Findly, John Grimes, Loriliai Biernacki, David L. Gosling, Thomas Forsthoefel, Michael H. Fisher, Ian Barrow, Srimati Basu, Natalie Gummer, Pradip Bhattacharya, John Grimes, Heather T. Frazer, Elaine Craddock, Andrea Pinkney, Joseph Schaller, Michael W. Myers, Lise F. Vail, Wayne Howard, Bradley B. Burroughs, Shalva Weil, Joseph A. Bracken, Christopher W. Gowans, Dan Cozort, Katherine Janiec Jones, Carl Olson, M. D. McLean, A. Whitney Sanford, Sarah Lamb, Eliza F. Kent, Ashley Dawson, Amir Hussain, John Powers, Jennifer B. Saunders & Ramdas Lamb - 2005 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):153-228.
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  3. The Anthropic Cosmological Principle.John D. Barrow - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    Ever since Copernicus, scientists have continually adjusted their view of human nature, moving it further and further from its ancient position at the center of Creation. But in recent years, a startling new concept has evolved that places it more firmly than ever in a special position. Known as the Anthropic Cosmological Principle, this collection of ideas holds that the existence of intelligent observers determines the fundamental structure of the Universe. In its most radical version, the Anthropic Principle asserts that (...)
  4. Utilitarianism: A Contemporary Statement.Robin Barrow - 2015 - Routledge.
    In this book, first published in 1991, the author Dr Robin Barrow adopts the view that utilitarianism is the most coherent and persuasive ethical theory we have and argues in favour of a specific form of rule-utilitarianism. This book will be of interest to students of philosophy.
     
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  5. Theories of Everything: The Quest for Ultimate Explanation.John D. Barrow - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    In books such as The World Within the World and The Anthropic Cosmological Principle, astronomer John Barrow has emerged as a leading writer on our efforts to understand the universe. Timothy Ferris, writing in The Times Literary Supplement of London, described him as "a temperate and accomplished humanist, scientist, and philosopher of science--a man out to make a contribution, not a show." Now Barrow offers the general reader another fascinating look at modern physics, as he explores the quest (...)
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  6.  26
    Impossibility: The Limits of Science and the Science of Limits.John D. Barrow - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    John Barrow is increasingly recognized as one of our most elegant and accomplished science writers, a brilliant commentator on cosmology, mathematics, and modern physics. Barrow now tackles the heady topic of impossibility, in perhaps his strongest book yet. Writing with grace and insight, Barrow argues convincingly that there are limits to human discovery, that there are things that are ultimately unknowable, undoable, or unreachable. He first examines the limits on scientific inquiry imposed by the deficiencies of the (...)
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  7. Beyond Liberal Education: Essays in Honour of Paul H. Hirst.Paul Heywood Hirst, Robin Barrow & Patricia White (eds.) - 1993 - Routledge.
    This collection of essays by philosophers and educationalists of international reputation, all published here for the first time, celebrates Paul Hirst's professional career. The introductory essay by Robin Barrow and Patricia White outlines Paul Hirst's career and maps the shifts in his thought about education, showing how his views on teacher education, the curriculum and educational aims are interrelated. Contributions from leading names in British and American philosophy of education cover themes ranging from the nature of good teaching to (...)
  8.  15
    The Philosophy of Schooling.Robin Barrow - 1981 - Wheatsheaf.
    This book, first published in 1981, provides a penetrating and lucid introduction to the philosophy of education. The emphasis on schooling rather than education draws attention to the broad spectrum of the book: recognising that schools generally do more than educate, Dr. Barrow specifically addresses himself to the larger question of what schools are for and what they should do. This book will be of interest both to students of philosophy and students of education.
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  9. The Artful Universe.John D. Barrow - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Our likes and dislikes--our senses and sensibilities--did not fall ready-made from the sky, argues internationally acclaimed author John D. Barrow. We know we enjoy a beautiful painting or a passionate symphony, but what we don't necessarily understand is that these experiences conjure up latent instincts laid down and perpetuated over millions of years. Now, in The Artful Universe, Barrow explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe, challenging the commonly held view (...)
     
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  10.  20
    The Artful Universe Expanded.John D. Barrow - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe, Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts (...)
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  11. The Philosophy of Schooling.Robin Barrow - 1981 - Routledge.
    This book, first published in 1981, provides a penetrating and lucid introduction to the philosophy of education. The emphasis on schooling rather than education draws attention to the broad spectrum of the book: recognising that schools generally do more than educate, Dr. Barrow specifically addresses himself to the larger question of what schools are for and what they should do. This book will be of interest both to students of philosophy and students of education.
     
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  12. Injustice, Inequality and Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction to Moral Problems.Robin Barrow - 1982 - Barnes & Noble.
    Abortion, distribution of wealth, civil disobedience, reverse discrimination, sex-role stereotyping, censorship – what does philosophy have to contribute to these practical moral issues? In this important book, first published in 1982, Robin Barrow argues convincingly that the capacity to make fine conceptual discriminations is crucial to an informed response to such issues, and he alerts us to the degree to which this ability has been lacking in much previous philosophical thought. The author presents a series of formidable arguments regarding (...)
     
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  13. Injustice, Inequality and Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction to Moral Problems.Robin Barrow - 1982 - Routledge.
    Abortion, distribution of wealth, civil disobedience, reverse discrimination, sex-role stereotyping, censorship – what does philosophy have to contribute to these practical moral issues? In this important book, first published in 1982, Robin Barrow argues convincingly that the capacity to make fine conceptual discriminations is crucial to an informed response to such issues, and he alerts us to the degree to which this ability has been lacking in much previous philosophical thought. The author presents a series of formidable arguments regarding (...)
     
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  14. Language, Intelligence, and Thought.Robin Barrow - 2015 - Routledge.
    In this text, first published in 1993, Barrow decisively rejects the traditional assumption that intelligence has no educational significance and contends instead that intelligence is developed by the enlargement of understanding. Arguing that much educational research is driven by a concept of intelligence that has no obvious educational relevance, Dr Barrow suggests that this is partly due to a widespread lack of understanding about the nature and point of philosophical analysis, and partly due to a failure to face (...)
     
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  15. Mathematics as Philosophy: Barrow and Proclus.Ian Stewart - 2000 - Dionysius 18:151-182.
     
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  16.  16
    Skill Talk.Robin Barrow - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):187–195.
  17. A Defect in the Argument for Realism.George A. Barrow - 1919 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (13):337-347.
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  18.  44
    The Concept of Curriculum Design.Robin Barrow - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (1):73–80.
  19.  15
    Religion in the Schools.Robin Barrow - 1974 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 6 (1):49–57.
  20.  38
    The Generic Fallacy.Robin Barrow - 1991 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 23 (1):7–17.
  21.  33
    Judging Quality of Human Achievement.Robin Barrow - 2006 - Education and Culture 22 (1):7-16.
    : This paper defends the commonsense view that judgments about the quality of human achievement in the arts can be true or false and shown to be so by objective reasoning, as against both subjectivist views and, more particularly, the view that they can be quantitatively expressed and scientifically demonstrated. It focuses on Charles Murray's recent attempt to rank-order the great achievers in an objective manner, arguing that it is fundamentally flawed, especially in confusing the quantification of references with an (...)
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  22.  14
    Philosophic Competence and Discriminatory Power: A Reply to Alan Smithson.R. Barrow - 1981 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 15 (2):229–233.
  23.  11
    Liberalism and Orthodoxy.George Alexander Barrow - 1912 - International Journal of Ethics 22 (2):202-216.
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  24.  14
    A Via Media Between Realism and Idealism.George A. Barrow - 1920 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (9):234-241.
  25.  13
    Who Are the Philosopher-Kings?Robin Barrow - 1974 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 8 (2):200–221.
  26.  40
    On Ian Hacking’s Notion of Style of Reasoning.Luca Sciortino - 2016 - Erkenntnis:1-22.
    The analytical notion of ‘scientific style of reasoning’, introduced by Ian Hacking in the middle of the 1980s, has become widespread in the literature of the history and philosophy of science. However, scholars have rarely made explicit the philosophical assumptions and the research objectives underlying the notion of style: what are its philosophical roots? How does the notion of style fit into the area of research of historical epistemology? What does a comparison between Hacking’s project on styles of thinking and (...)
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  27.  42
    Ontología histórica Y nominalismo dinámico: La propuesta de Ian Hacking para las ciencias humanas.María Laura Martínez - 2010 - Cinta de Moebio 39:130-141.
    En los últimos años Ian Hacking se ha dedicado a trabajar principalmente acerca de las ciencias humanas. El objetivo de este artículo es presentar algunas de las nociones acuñadas por el filósofo canadiense -fundamentalmente las de ontología histórica y nominalismo dinámico- para dicho ámbito. A par..
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  28. A Bibliography of the Published Works [of] Ian Thomas Ramsey.Jonathan H. Pye & Ian T. Ramsey - 1979
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  29. Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight: Ian Hacking.Ian Hacking - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 61:203-239.
    The rosy dawn of my title refers to that optimistic time when the logical concept of a natural kind originated in Victorian England. The scholastic twilight refers to the present state of affairs. I devote more space to dawn than twilight, because one basic problem was there from the start, and by now those origins have been forgotten. Philosophers have learned many things about classification from the tradition of natural kinds. But now it is in disarray and is unlikely to (...)
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  30.  13
    From Microscopes to Optogenetics: Ian Hacking Vindicated.John Bickle - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):1065-1077.
    I introduce two new tools in experimental neurobiology, optogenetics and DREADDs. These tools permit unprecedented control over activity in specific neurons in behaving animals. In addition to their inherent scientific interest, these tools make an important contribution to philosophy of science. They illustrate the very premises of Ian Hacking’s “microscope” argument for the relative independence of experiment from theory. This new example is important for generalizing Hacking’s argument because the background sciences and the fields of engineering producing these tools differ (...)
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  31. Some Comments on Ian Rumfitt’s Bilateralism.Nils Kürbis - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 45 (6):623-644.
    Ian Rumfitt has proposed systems of bilateral logic for primitive speech acts of assertion and denial, with the purpose of ‘exploring the possibility of specifying the classically intended senses for the connectives in terms of their deductive use’ : 810f). Rumfitt formalises two systems of bilateral logic and gives two arguments for their classical nature. I assess both arguments and conclude that only one system satisfies the meaning-theoretical requirements Rumfitt imposes in his arguments. I then formalise an intuitionist system of (...)
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  32. Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson.Jon Robson - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were sound (...)
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  33.  33
    On Ian Hacking’s Notion of Style of Reasoning.Luca Sciortino - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (2):243-264.
    The analytical notion of ‘scientific style of reasoning’, introduced by Ian Hacking in the middle of the 1980s, has become widespread in the literature of the history and philosophy of science. However, scholars have rarely made explicit the philosophical assumptions and the research objectives underlying the notion of style: what are its philosophical roots? How does the notion of style fit into the area of research of historical epistemology? What does a comparison between the Hacking’s project on styles of thinking (...)
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  34.  90
    How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom : A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees: Ian Carter and Matthew H. Kramer.Ian Carter - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
    How is a person's freedom related to his or her preferences? Liberal theorists of negative freedom have generally taken the view that the desire of a person to do or not do something is irrelevant to the question of whether he is free to do it. Supporters of the “pure negative” conception of freedom have advocated this view in its starkest form: they maintain that a person is unfree to Φ if and only if he is prevented from Φ-ing by (...)
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  35.  33
    The Mead–Freeman Controversy Continues: A Reply to Ian Jarvie.Paul Shankman - 2018 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 48 (3):309-332.
    In the Mead–Freeman controversy, Ian Jarvie has supported much of Derek Freeman’s critique of Margaret Mead’s Coming of Age in Samoa, arguing that Samoan society was sexually repressive rather than sexually permissive, that Mead was “hoaxed” about Samoan sexual conduct, that Mead was an “absolute” cultural determinist, that Samoa was a definitive case refuting Mead’s “absolute” cultural determinism, that Mead’s book changed the direction of cultural anthropology, and that Freeman’s personal conduct during the controversy was thoroughly professional. This article calls (...)
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  36. Ian Hacking's Proposal for the Distinction Between Natural and Social Sciences.M. L. Martinez - 2009 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (2):212-234.
    This article explores the proposal offered by Ian Hacking for the distinction between natural and social sciences—a proposal that he has defined from the outset as complex and different from the traditional ones. Our objective is not only to present the path followed by Hacking’s distinction, but also to determine if it constitutes a novelty or not. For this purpose, we deemed it necessary to briefly introduce the core notions Hacking uses to establish his strategic approach to social sciences, under (...)
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  37.  94
    The Boundary Stones of Thought: An Essay in the Philosophy of Logic, by Ian Rumfitt. [REVIEW]Peter Fritz - 2018 - Mind 127 (505):265-276.
    In his book The Boundary Stones of Thought, Ian Rumfitt considers five arguments in favour of intuitionistic logic over classical logic. Two of these arguments are based on reflections concerning the meaning of statements in general, due to Michael Dummett and John McDowell. The remaining three are more specific, concerning statements about the infinite and the infinitesimal, statements involving vague terms, and statements about sets.Rumfitt is sympathetic to the premisses of many of these arguments, and takes some of them to (...)
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  38. Deleuzism: A Metacommentary / Ian Buchanan.Ian Buchanan - 2000 - Duke University Press.
  39. Barrow and Tipler on the Anthropic Principle Vs. Divine Design.William Lane Craig - 1988 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):389-395.
    Barrow and Tipler’s contention that the Anthropic Principle is obviously true and removes the need for an explanation of fine-tuning fails because the Principle is trivially true, and only within the context of a World Ensemble, whose existence is not obvious, does a selection effect become significant. Their objections to divine design as an explanation of fine-tuning are seen to be misconceived.
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  40.  23
    Foucauldian Imprints in the Early Works of Ian Hacking.María Laura Martínez - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):69-84.
    Ian Hacking has defined himself as a philosopher in the analytic tradition. However, he has also recognized the profound influence that Michel Foucault had on much of his work. In this article I analyse the specific imprint of certain works by Foucault—in particular Les mots et les choses—in two of Hacking’s early works: Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? and The Emergence of Probability. I propose that these texts not only share a debt of Foucauldian thought, but also are part (...)
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  41.  23
    Is There Adequate Empirical Evidence for Reincarnation? An Analysis of Ian Stevenson’s Work.Leonard Angel - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 575-583.
    This article reviews the research of “top rebirth scientist” Ian Stevenson on spontaneous past-life memory cases, focusing on three key problems with Stevenson’s work. First, his research of entirely anecdotal case reports contains a number of errors and omissions. Second, like other reincarnation researchers, Stevenson has done no controlled experimental work on such cases; yet only such research could ever resolve whether the correspondences found between a child’s statements and a deceased person’s life exceed what we might find by chance. (...)
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  42.  33
    Two Uses of Michel Foucault in Political Theory: Concepts and Methods in Giorgio Agamben and Ian Hacking.Colin Koopman - 2015 - Constellations 22 (4):571-585.
    This deep presence of Foucault’s influence across contemporary theoretical landscapes signals a need for self-reflectiveness that has largely (though not entirely) been missing in contemporary uses of Foucault. While scholarship in a Foucauldian vein is obviously alive and well, scholarship on Foucauldian methodology is not. This paper develops a distinction between two methodological features of Foucault’s work that deserve to be disentangled: I parse the methods (e.g., genealogy, archaeology) and concepts (e.g., discipline, biopower) featured in Foucault’s texts. Following this, I (...)
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  43. Taking Theology and Science Seriously Without Category Mistakes: A Response to Ian Barbour.Taede A. Smedes - 2008 - Zygon 43 (1):271-276.
    . In my response to Ian Barbour's criticisms, I first argue for the anthropological dimensions and contextuality of any theology. Next I examine and criticize Barbour's thesis that I am an in‐compatibilist about divine action. Finally I illustrate the fact that I see genuine opportunities for a dialogue between theologians and scientists without apologetics, category mistakes, or relegating theology to the fringes of science, by pointing to evolutionary explanations of religion.
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  44.  72
    Physics and Astronomy: Aristotle's Physics II.2.193b22–194a12this Paper Was Prepared as the Basis of a Presentation at a Conference Entitled “Writing and Rewriting the History of Science, 1900–2000,” Les treilLes, France, September, 2003, Organized by Karine Chemla and Roshdi Rashed. I Have Compared Aristotle's and Ptolemy's Views of the Relationship Between Astronomy and Physics in a Paper Called “Astrologogeômetria and Astrophysikê in Aristotle and Ptolemy,” Presented at a Conference Entitled “Physics and Mathematics in Antiquity,” Leiden, the Netherlands, June, 2004, Organized by Keimpe Algra and Frans de Haas. For a Discussion of Hellenistic Views of This Relationship See Ian Mueller, “Remarks on Physics and Mathematical Astronomy and Optics in Epicurus, Sextus Empiricus, and Some Stoics,” in Philippa Lang , Re-Inventions: Essays on Hellenistic and Early Roman Science, Apeiron 37, 4 : 57–87. I Would Like to Thank Two Anonymous Readers of This Essay for Meticulous Corrections and Th. [REVIEW]Ian Mueller - 2006 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):175-206.
    In the first part of chapter 2 of book II of the Physics Aristotle addresses the issue of the difference between mathematics and physics. In the course of his discussion he says some things about astronomy and the ‘ ‘ more physical branches of mathematics”. In this paper I discuss historical issues concerning the text, translation, and interpretation of the passage, focusing on two cruxes, the first reference to astronomy at 193b25–26 and the reference to the more physical branches at 194a7–8. In (...)
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  45.  99
    Reinventing Certainty: The Significance of Ian Hacking's Realism.Alan G. Gross - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:421 - 431.
    This paper examines Ian Hacking's arguments in favor of entity realism. It shows that his examples from science do not support his realism. Furthermore, his proposed criterion of experimental use is neither sufficient nor necessary for conferring a privileged status on his preferred unobservables. Nonetheless his insight is genuine; it may be most profitably seen as part of a more general effort to create a space for a new form of scientific and philosophical certainty, one that does not require foundations.
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  46.  56
    Review of Yoga: The Indian Tradition by Ian Whicher; David Carpenter (Eds). [REVIEW]Marzenna Jakubczak - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):353-358.
                      Book review: Yoga: The Indian Tradition. Edited by Ian Whicher and David Carpenter. London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003, Pp. xii + 206     -/-  .
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  47.  31
    Literature and the "Good Doctor" in Ian McEwan's Saturday.J. Macnaughton - 2007 - Medical Humanities 33 (2):70-74.
    There is widespread acceptance in medical humanities circles that reading is good for doctors and that, in medical educational terms, it is particularly good at making better doctors by widening perspective and developing the sensibilities. Recent recommendations on medical education in the UK have allowed medical students to take courses in literature as a component of their degrees, and some have suggested that this option should be compulsory for all doctors. It is possible, however, that in our eagerness to assert (...)
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  48.  52
    Scratches on the Face of the Country; or, What Mr. Barrow Saw in the Land of the Bushmen.Mary Louise Pratt - 1985 - Critical Inquiry 12 (1):119-143.
    If the discourse of manners and customs aspires to a stable fixing of subjects and systems of differences, however, its project is not and never can be complete. This is true if only for the seemingly trivial reason that manners-and-customs descriptions seldom occur on their own as discrete texts. They usually appear embedded in or appended to a superordinate genre, whether a narrative, as in travel books and much ethnography, or an assemblage, as in anthologies and magazines.6 In the case (...)
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  49.  93
    Ian Hacking, Learner Categories and Human Taxonomies.Andrew Davis - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):441-455.
    I use Ian Hacking 's views to explore ways of classifying people, exploiting his distinction between indifferent kinds and interactive kinds, and his accounts of how we 'make up' people. The natural kind/essentialist approach to indifferent kinds is explored in some depth. I relate this to debates in psychiatry about the existence of mental illness, and to educational controversies about the credentials of learner classifications such as 'dyslexic'. Claims about the 'existence' of learning disabilities cannot be given a clear, simple (...)
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  50.  24
    On the Duty of Educating Respect: A Response to Robin Barrow.Graham Haydon - 2006 - Journal of Moral Education 35 (1):19-32.
    This article is a response to Robin Barrow's John Wilson Memorial Lecture ?On the duty of not taking offence?. The present article takes issue with some of Barrow's claims and explores further the implications for moral education of some current views on the giving and taking of offence. Accounts are offered both of ?inherent offensiveness? (an important theme in Barrow's lecture) and of offence to persons. The questions ?are people too ready to take offence?? and ?are we (...)
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