37 found
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  1. Respect and the Basis of Equality.Ian Carter - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3):538-571.
    In what sense are persons equal, such that it is appropriate to treat them as equals? This difficult question has been strangely neglected by political philosophers. A plausible answer can be found by adopting a particular interpretation of the idea of respect. Central to this interpretation is the thought that in order to respect persons we need to treat them as ‘opaque', paying attention only to their outward features as agents. This proposed basis of equality has important implications for the (...)
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  2.  65
    How Are Power and Unfreedom Related.Ian Carter - 2008 - In Cécile Laborde & John W. Maynor (eds.), Republicanism and Political Theory. Blackwell. pp. 58--82.
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  3. A Measure of Freedom.Ian Carter (ed.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    How do we know when one person or society is 'freer' than another? Can freedom be measured? Is more freedom better than less? This book provides the first full-length treatment of these fundamental yet neglected issues, throwing new light both on the notion of freedom and on contemporary liberalism.
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  4.  35
    Is the Capability Approach Paternalist?Ian Carter - 2014 - Economics and Philosophy 30 (1):75-98.
  5.  33
    Basic Equality and the Site of Egalitarian Justice.Ian Carter - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (1):21-41.
    The nature of basic equality (what it is that makes us all equals) can have implications not only for the question of the currency of egalitarian justice but also for that of its . The latter question is raised by G. A. Cohen in his critique of John Rawls's theory of justice. In this paper I argue that Rawlsian liberals might provide an answer to Cohen's critique by establishing two distinct kinds of basic equality, thus providing a of basic equality. (...)
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  6.  1
    Debate: The Myth of ‘Merely Formal Freedom’.Ian Carter - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (4):486-495.
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  7.  69
    Debate: The Myth of 'Merely Formal Freedom'.Ian Carter - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (4):486-495.
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  8.  9
    Equal Opportunity, Responsibility, and Personal Identity.Ian Carter - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    According to the ‘starting-gate’ interpretation of equality of opportunity, individuals who enjoy equal starts can legitimately become unequal to the extent that their differences derive from choices for which they can be held responsible. There can be no coercive transfers of resources in favour of individuals who disregarded their own futures, and no limits on the right of an individual to distribute resources intrapersonally. This paper assesses two ways in which advocates of equality of opportunity might depart from the starting-gate (...)
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  9.  36
    Are Toleration and Respect Compatible?Ian Carter - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):195-208.
    Toleration and respect are often thought of as compatible, and indeed complementary, liberal democratic ideals. However, it has sometimes been said that toleration is disrespectful, because it necessarily involves a negative evaluation of the object of toleration. This article shows how toleration and respect are compatible as long as ‘ respect ’ is taken to mean recognition respect, as opposed to appraisal respect. But it also argues that recognition respect itself rules out certain kinds of evaluation of persons, and with (...)
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  10. A Measure of Freedom.Ian Carter (ed.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press UK.
    It is often said that one person or society is `freer' than another, or that people have a right to equal freedom, or that freedom should be increased or even maximized. Such quantitative claims about freedom are of great importance to us, forming an essential part of our political discourse and theorizing. Yet their meaning has been surprisingly neglected by political philosophers until now. Ian Carter provides the first systematic account of the nature and importance of our judgements about degrees (...)
     
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  11. Book Review: Raymond Williams' Sociology of Culture: A Critical Reconstruction. [REVIEW]Ian Carter - 2005 - Thesis Eleven 80 (1):126-130.
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  12. 10. George Sher, Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness George Sher, Who Knew? Responsibility Without Awareness (Pp. 675-680). [REVIEW]Debbie Roberts, Tom Dougherty, Ian Carter, Anna Stilz & David Shoemaker - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3).
     
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  13. A Measure of Freedom.Ian Carter - 2001 - Law and Philosophy 20 (5):531-540.
     
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  14.  47
    The Independent Value of Freedom.Ian Carter - 1995 - Ethics 105 (4):819-845.
  15. Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges.Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    Throughout the English-speaking world, and in the many other countries where analytic philosophy is studied, Hillel Steiner is esteemed as one of the foremost contemporary political philosophers. This volume is designed as a festschrift for Steiner and as an important collection of philosophical essays in its own right. The editors have assembled a roster of highly distinguished international contributors, all of whom are eager to pay tribute to Steiner by focusing on topics on which he himself has concentrated. Some of (...)
     
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  16. Book Review: José Saramago: Latterday Tolstoy? [REVIEW]Ian Carter - 2005 - Thesis Eleven 83 (1):122-131.
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  17.  63
    How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom (and How They Cannot): A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees.Ian Carter & Matthew H. Kramer - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
    How is a person's freedom related to his or her preferences? Liberal theorists of negative freedom have generally taken the view that the desire of a person to do or not do something is irrelevant to the question of whether he is free to do it. Supporters of the “pure negative” conception of freedom have advocated this view in its starkest form: they maintain that a person is unfree to Φ if and only if he is prevented from Φ-ing by (...)
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  18. Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology.Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.) - 2007 - Blackwell.
    Edited by leading contributors to the literature, Freedom: An Anthology is the most complete anthology on social, political and economic freedom ever compiled. Offers a broad guide to the vast literature on social, political and economic freedom. Contains selections from the best scholarship of recent decades as well as classic writings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant among others. General and sectional introductions help to orient the reader. Compiled and edited by three important contributors to the field.
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  19. Respect for Persons and the Interest in Freedom.Ian Carter - 2009 - In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge. pp. 16--167.
  20.  14
    Interpersonal Comparisons of Freedom.Ian Carter - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (1):1.
    This paper is about the relevance, to the definition of freedom, of values or goods other than freedom. In this respect,its subject matter is not at all new. However, I do believe that new light can be thrown on the nature of this relationship by paying more attention to another relationship – one which exists within the concept of freedom itself. There are two senses in which we can be said to possess freedom. Firstly, there is the sense in which (...)
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  21.  50
    The March of Freedom.Ian Carter - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):123-124.
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  22. Ought Implies Practically Possible.Ian Carter - 2001 - In Freedom, Power and Political Morality: Essays for Felix Oppenheim. Palgrave. pp. 79-95.
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  23.  1
    The Rural Community and the Small School.Diana Forsythe, Ian Carter, G. A. Mackay, John Nisbet, Peter Sadler & John Sewel - 1984 - British Journal of Educational Studies 32 (3):286-287.
  24.  17
    Italy.Ian Carter - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 49:44-47.
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  25.  8
    How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom : A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees: Ian Carter and Matthew H. Kramer.Ian Carter - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
    How is a person's freedom related to his or her preferences? Liberal theorists of negative freedom have generally taken the view that the desire of a person to do or not do something is irrelevant to the question of whether he is free to do it. Supporters of the “pure negative” conception of freedom have advocated this view in its starkest form: they maintain that a person is unfree to Φ if and only if he is prevented from Φ-ing by (...)
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  26.  20
    Introduction.Ian Carter & Maria Paola Ferretti - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):191-194.
    In attempting to clarify both the concept of toleration and its role in contemporary society several authors have interpreted it as based on the notion of respect for persons. Persons are due respect as moral agents and as such should be allowed to make their own choices, even if the content of those choices meets with our disapproval. According to a classical understanding of toleration, one can be said to tolerate something if one disapproves of it (this is commonly called (...)
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  27.  10
    Is Analytical Action Theory Reductionist?Ian Carter - 1991 - Analyse & Kritik 13 (1):61-66.
    Steven Lukes and Alasdair MacIntyre have accused analytical action theory of being motivated by reductionist aims and of ignoring the fact that what is distinctively human about actions is their essentially social character. These reductionist aims are said to 'subvert, the search for the distinctively human. Enterprises that have particularly come under fire are the search for 'basic' actions and attempts to solve problems regarding the 'individuation' of actions. Lukes and MacIntyre are mistaken however, both in their interpretation of the (...)
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  28.  6
    I due Rawls di Maffettone.Ian Carter - 2011 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 24 (3):643-652.
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  29.  6
    Funzionamenti e capacità: una critica liberale alle teorie di Sen e Nussbaum.Ian Carter - 2001 - Rivista di Filosofia 92 (1):49-70.
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  30. La Libertad negativa y positiva.Ian Carter - 2010 - Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 10:15-35.
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  31.  4
    Discussione Su "If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich?" di G.A. Cohen.Ian Carter, Michael Otsuka & Francesco Saverio Trincia - 2001 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 14 (3):609-634.
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  32.  9
    Review of Michael Otsuka, Libertarianism Without Inequality[REVIEW]Ian Carter - 2004 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (9).
  33.  1
    Interpersonal Comparisons of Freedom.Ian Carter - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (2):1-23.
    This paper is about the relevance, to the definition of freedom, of values or goods other than freedom. In this respect,its subject matter is not at all new. However, I do believe that new light can be thrown on the nature of this relationship by paying more attention to another relationship – one which exists within the concept of freedom itself. There are two senses in which we can be said to possess freedom. Firstly, there is the sense in which (...)
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  34.  1
    The March of Freedom. [REVIEW]Ian Carter - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50:123-124.
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  35. Can Enlightenment Morality Be Justified Teleologically?Ian Carter - 1997 - Manchester Centre for Political Thought.
     
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  36. Freedom, Power and Political Morality: Essays for Felix Oppenheim.Ian Carter - 2001 - Palgrave.
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  37. Freedom, Power, and Political Morality: Essays for Felix Oppenheim.Felix E. Oppenheim, Ian Carter & Mario Ricciardi (eds.) - 2001 - Palgrave.
    This collection of original essays on political and legal theory concentrates on themes dealt with in the work of Felix Oppenheim, including fundamental political and legal concepts and their implications for the scope of morality in politics and international relations. Among the issues addressed are the relationship between empirical and normative definitions of "freedom", "power", and "interests", whether governments are free to act against the national interest, and whether they can ever be morally obliged to do so.
     
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