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Ian D. Dunkle
University of Southern Mississippi
  1.  44
    On the Normativity of Nietzsche's Will to Power.Ian D. Dunkle - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):188-211.
    A prominent tradition in Nietzsche scholarship reads his views about will to power as a psychological thesis and his claims about the value of power as an attempt to derive normativity from psychological necessity. This article shows that these interpretations have failed to articulate a cogent reading faithful to Nietzsche’s texts, and so casts doubt on such an approach. My argument bears not only on how we read Nietzsche, but also on the viability of one recent constitutivist reading. After presenting (...)
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  2. The Competition Account of Achievement‐Value.Ian D. Dunkle - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (4):1018-1046.
    A great achievement makes one’s life go better independently of its results, but what makes an achievement great? A simple answer is—its difficulty. I defend this view against recent, pressing objections by interpreting difficulty in terms of competitiveness. Difficulty is determined not by how hard the agent worked for the end but by how hard others would need to do in order to compete. Successfully reaching a goal is a valuable achievement because it is difficult, and it is difficult because (...)
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  3. Moral Physiology and Vivisection of the Soul: Why Does Nietzsche Criticize the Life Sciences?Ian D. Dunkle - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):62-81.
    Recent scholarship has shown Nietzsche to offer an original and insightful moral psychology centering on a motivational feature he calls ‘will to power.’ In many places, though, Nietzsche presents will to power differently, as the ‘essence of life,’ an account of ‘organic function,’ even offering it as a correction to physiologists. This paper clarifies the scope and purpose of will to power by identifying the historical physiological view at which Nietzsche directs his criticisms and by identifying his purpose in doing (...)
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  4. Nietzsche's Concept of Health.Ian D. Dunkle - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Nietzsche assesses values, moralities, religions, cultures, and persons in terms of health. He argues that we should reject those that are unhealthy and develop healthier alternatives. But what is Nietzsche’s conception of health, and why should it carry such normative force? In this paper I argue for reading Nietzsche’s concept of health as the overall ability to meet the demands of one’s motivational landscape. I show that, unlike other interpretations, this reading accounts for his rejection of particular features of a (...)
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  5.  37
    Growth and the Shape of a Life.Ian D. Dunkle - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    Why does it seem better to be a pauper who becomes a king rather than a king who becomes a pauper even when each life contains an equivalent sum of goods to the other? Many argue that only the pauper-to-king life can be told as a redemption story and that it is good for you to live a redemption story. This paper calls that explanation into question and proposes an alternative: upward-trending lives reveal growth. I argue that growth is a (...)
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  6.  6
    Morality as Cure and Poison in Nietzsche's Genealogy.Ian D. Dunkle - 2022 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 53 (1):34-58.
    Nietzsche argues in the Genealogy of Morality (GM) that key aspects of modern European morality arose as “cures” for widespread human sickness but are ultimately making us sicker (“poisoning” us). This article provides a systematic overview of how Nietzsche believes morality has functioned as a cure and poison for European humanity. Drawing on my own previous work on Nietzsche’s concept of health, I sketch an overview of the (1) sicknesses, (2) treatments, and (3) pathogeneses discussed in each of the three (...)
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  7.  44
    Morality Makes Me Sick: A Criticism of Brian Leiter's Treatment of Health in Nietzsche.Ian D. Dunkle - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (3):446-460.
    ABSTRACT In this article, the author offers a reconstruction and criticism of Brian Leiter's interpretation of Nietzsche's criticism of conventional morality in Nietzsche on Morality. Leiter's interpretation is said to falter because it attributes to Nietzsche an implausible combination of positions. First, Nietzsche is said to be a value antirealist. But he is also said to defer to the value of the flourishing of his audience, who are limited to a certain subset of “higher” humans. The author argues that, in (...)
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  8.  20
    Nietzsche on Art and Life Ed. By Daniel Came. [REVIEW]Ian D. Dunkle - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (3):434-439.
    "Nietzsche on art and life" is an alluring topic. As the editor of this volume, Daniel Came, puts it, art plays a central role in "the principal task [Nietzsche] set himself as a philosopher—to identify the conditions of the affirmation of life, cultural renewal, and exemplary human beings". Since the precise nature of this task, and the role of art in it, is hard to pin down, a volume that promises to clarify these issues cannot fail to attract readers of (...)
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  9.  17
    Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity, Edited by Christopher Janaway and Simon Robertson. [REVIEW]Ian D. Dunkle - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (3):381-384.
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