14 found
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Ian H. Kerridge [13]Ian Harold Kerridge [1]
  1. “Good Mothering” or “Good Citizenship”?: Conflicting Values in Choosing Whether to Donate or Store Umbilical Cord Blood.Maree Porter, Ian H. Kerridge & Christopher F. C. Jordens - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):41-47.
    Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child’s best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby’s umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may (...)
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  2.  77
    Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice.Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of life. The (...)
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  3.  23
    Double Meanings Will Not Save the Principle of Double Effect.Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):304-316.
    In an article somewhat ironically entitled “Disambiguating Clinical Intentions,” Lynn Jansen promotes an idea that should be bewildering to anyone familiar with the literature on the intention/foresight distinction. According to Jansen, “intention” has two commonsense meanings, one of which is equivalent to “foresight.” Consequently, questions about intention are “infected” with ambiguity—people cannot tell what they mean and do not know how to answer them. This hypothesis is unsupported by evidence, but Jansen states it as if it were accepted fact. In (...)
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  4.  27
    Ethical and Regulatory Challenges with Autologous Adult Stem Cells: A Comparative Review of International Regulations.Tamra Lysaght, Ian H. Kerridge, Douglas Sipp, Gerard Porter & Benjamin J. Capps - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):261-273.
    Cell and tissue-based products, such as autologous adult stem cells, are being prescribed by physicians across the world for diseases and illnesses that they have neither been approved for or been demonstrated as safe and effective in formal clinical trials. These doctors often form part of informal transnational networks that exploit differences and similarities in the regulatory systems across geographical contexts. In this paper, we examine the regulatory infrastructure of five geographically diverse but socio-economically comparable countries with the aim of (...)
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  5.  29
    Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process.Wendy Lipworth, Ian H. Kerridge, Stacy M. Carter & Miles Little - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):267-280.
    Peer review of manuscripts for biomedical journals has become a subject of intense ethical debate. One of the most contentious issues is whether or not peer review should be anonymous. This study aimed to generate a rich, empirically-grounded understanding of the values held by journal editors and peer reviewers with a view to informing journal policy. Qualitative methods were used to carry out an inductive analysis of biomedical reviewers’ and editors’ values. Data was derived from in-depth, open-ended interviews with journal (...)
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  6.  42
    Uncertain Translation, Uncertain Benefit and Uncertain Risk: Ethical Challenges Facing First-in-Human Trials of Induced Pluripotent Stem (Ips) Cells.Ronald K. F. Fung & Ian H. Kerridge - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (2):89-96.
    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in 2006 was heralded as a major breakthrough in stem cell research. Since then, progress in iPS cell technology has paved the way towards clinical application, particularly cell replacement therapy, which has refueled debate on the ethics of stem cell research. However, much of the discourse has focused on questions of moral status and potentiality, overlooking the ethical issues which are introduced by the clinical testing of iPS cell replacement therapy. First-in-human trials, (...)
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  7.  60
    Autonomy and Chronic Illness: Not Two Components but Many.Camilla Scanlan & Ian H. Kerridge - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):40 – 42.
  8.  37
    Reconceptualizing Involuntary Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: From "Capacity" to "Capability".Edwina M. Light, Michael D. Robertson, Ian H. Kerridge, Philip Boyce, Terry Carney, Alan Rosen, Michelle Cleary, Glenn E. Hunt & Nick O'Connor - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):33-45.
    Justifying involuntary psychiatric treatment on the basis of a judgment that a person lacks capacity is usually expressed in terms of a person’s ability to make a decision about his or her health and treatment. Typically, this relates to the ability to refuse treatment. Exactly what “capacity” means, however, and how one determines when another individual lacks capacity, or lacks sufficient capacity, in this context is particularly controversial, with the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities insisting (...)
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  9.  45
    Privacy in the Context of “Re-Emergent” Infectious Diseases.Justin T. Denholm & Ian H. Kerridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):263-264.
  10.  76
    Gifts, Drug Samples, and Other Items Given to Medical Specialists by Pharmaceutical Companies.Paul M. McNeill, Ian H. Kerridge, Catherine Arciuli, David A. Henry, Graham J. Macdonald, Richard O. Day & Suzanne R. Hill - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):139-148.
    Aim To ascertain the quantity and nature of gifts and items provided by the pharmaceutical industry in Australia to medical specialists and to consider whether these are appropriate in terms of justifiable ethical standards, empirical research and views expressed in the literature.
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  11.  60
    Equity, Utility, and the Marketplace: Emerging Ethical Issues of Umbilical Cord Blood Banking in Australia. [REVIEW]Gabrielle N. Samuel & Ian H. Kerridge - 2007 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):57-63.
    Over the past decade, umbilical cord blood (UCB) has routinely been used as a source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic stem cell transplants in the treatment of a range of malignant and non-malignant conditions affecting children and adults. UCB banks are a necessary part of the UCB transplant program, but their establishment has raised a number of important scientific, ethical and political issues. This paper examines the scientific and clinical evidence that has provided the basis for the establishment of (...)
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  12.  38
    Marginalizing Experience: A Critical Analysis of Public Discourse Surrounding Stem Cell Research in Australia (2005–6). [REVIEW]Tamra Lysaght, John Miles Little & Ian Harold Kerridge - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):191-202.
    Over the past decade, stem cell science has generated considerable public and political debate. These debates tend to focus on issues concerning the protection of nascent human life and the need to generate medical and therapeutic treatments for the sick and vulnerable. The framing of the public debate around these issues not only dichotomises and oversimplifies the issues at stake, but tends to marginalise certain types of voices, such as the women who donate their eggs and/or embryos to stem cell (...)
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  13.  37
    Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Problem Is Not Ignorance–It Is Market Failure.Christopher F. C. Jordens, Ian H. Kerridge & Gabrielle N. Samuel - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):13-15.
  14. Teaching Medical Ethics Symposium: Teaching Clinical Ethics as a Professional Skill: Bridging the Gap Between Knowledge and Ethics and its Use in Clinical Practice.Catherine Myser, Ian H. Kerridge & Kenneth R. Mitchell - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):97-103.