251 found
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  1. The Social Construction of What?Ian Hacking - 1999 - Harvard University Press.
  2. Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science.Ian Hacking - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1983 book is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates about (...)
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  3. Historical Ontology.Ian Hacking - 2002 - Harvard University Press.
    The focus of this volume, which collects both recent and now-classic essays, is the historical emergence of concepts and objects, through new uses of words and ...
  4. Representing and Intervening.Ian Hacking - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (4):381-390.
     
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  5. Representing and Intervening.Ian Hacking - 1987 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 92 (2):279-279.
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  6. Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory.Ian Hacking - 1995 - Princeton University Press.
    Here the distinguished philosopher Ian Hacking uses the MPD epidemic and its links with the contemporary concept of child abuse to scrutinize today's moral...
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  7. The Emergence of Probability.Ian Hacking - 1995 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Ian Hacking here presents a philosophical critique of early ideas about probability, induction and statistical inference and the growth of this new family of ...
  8. The Taming of Chance.Ian Hacking - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this important new study Ian Hacking continues the enquiry into the origins and development of certain characteristic modes of contemporary thought undertaken in such previous works as his best selling Emergence of Probability. Professor Hacking shows how by the late nineteenth century it became possible to think of statistical patterns as explanatory in themselves, and to regard the world as not necessarily deterministic in character. Combining detailed scientific historical research with characteristic philosophic breath and verve, The Taming of Chance (...)
     
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  9.  48
    Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics.Ian Hacking - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (5):273-277.
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  10.  53
    How Experiments End.Ian Hacking - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):103-106.
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  11. Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight: Ian Hacking.Ian Hacking - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 61:203-239.
    The rosy dawn of my title refers to that optimistic time when the logical concept of a natural kind originated in Victorian England. The scholastic twilight refers to the present state of affairs. I devote more space to dawn than twilight, because one basic problem was there from the start, and by now those origins have been forgotten. Philosophers have learned many things about classification from the tradition of natural kinds. But now it is in disarray and is unlikely to (...)
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  12. Do We See Through a Microscope?Ian Hacking - 1981 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 62 (4):305-322.
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  13. Logic of Statistical Inference.Ian Hacking - 1976 - Cambridge University Press.
    One of Ian Hacking's earliest publications, this book showcases his early ideas on the central concepts and questions surrounding statistical reasoning. He explores the basic principles of statistical reasoning and tests them, both at a philosophical level and in terms of their practical consequences for statisticians. Presented in a fresh twenty-first-century series livery, and including a specially commissioned preface written by Jan-Willem Romeijn, illuminating its enduring importance and relevance to philosophical enquiry, Hacking's influential and original work has been revived for (...)
     
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  14. The Self-Vindication of the Laboratory Sciences.Ian Hacking - 1992 - In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. pp. 29--64.
  15. An Introduction to Probability and Inductive Logic.Ian Hacking - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory 2001 textbook on probability and induction written by one of the world's foremost philosophers of science. The book has been designed to offer maximal accessibility to the widest range of students and assumes no formal training in elementary symbolic logic. It offers a comprehensive course covering all basic definitions of induction and probability, and considers such topics as decision theory, Bayesianism, frequency ideas, and the philosophical problem of induction. The key features of this book are a (...)
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  16. Kinds of People: Moving Targets.Ian Hacking - 2007 - In Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 151, 2006 Lectures. pp. 285-318.
  17. ‘Style’ for Historians and Philosophers.Ian Hacking - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (1):1-20.
  18. A Tradition of Natural Kinds.Ian Hacking - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 61 (1-2):109-26.
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  19. Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory.Ian Hacking - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):531-533.
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  20. What is Logic?Ian Hacking - 1979 - Journal of Philosophy 76 (6):285-319.
  21. ‘Language, Truth and Reason’ 30years Later.Ian Hacking - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):599-609.
    This paper traces the origins of the styles project, originally presented as ‘styles of scientific reasoning’. ‘Styles of scientific thinking & doing’ is a better label; the styles can also be called genres, or, ways of finding out. A. C. Crombie’s template of six fundamentally distinct ones was turned into a philosophical tool, but with a tinge of Paul Feyerabend’s anarchism. Ways of finding out are not defined by necessary and sufficient conditions, but can be recognized as distinct within a (...)
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  22. The Emergence of Probability: A Philosophical Study of Early Ideas About Probability, Induction and Statistical Inference.Ian Hacking - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historical records show that there was no real concept of probability in Europe before the mid-seventeenth century, although the use of dice and other randomizing objects was commonplace. Ian Hacking presents a philosophical critique of early ideas about probability, induction, and statistical inference and the growth of this new family of ideas in the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries. Hacking invokes a wide intellectual framework involving the growth of science, economics, and the theology of the period. He argues that the (...)
     
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  23. Experimentation and Scientific Realism.Ian Hacking - 1982 - Philosophical Topics 13 (1):71-87.
  24. Philosophy and Animal Life.Stanley Cavell, Cora Diamond, John McDowell, Ian Hacking & Cary Wolfe - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    _Philosophy and Animal Life_ offers a new way of thinking about animal rights, our obligation to animals, and the nature of philosophy itself. Cora Diamond begins with "The Difficulty of Reality and the Difficulty of Philosophy," in which she accuses analytical philosophy of evading, or deflecting, the responsibility of human beings toward nonhuman animals. Diamond then explores the animal question as it is bound up with the more general problem of philosophical skepticism. Focusing specifically on J. M. Coetzee's _The Lives (...)
     
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  25. Work in a New World: The Taxonomic Solution.Ian Hacking - 1993 - In Paul Horwich (ed.), World Changes. Thomas Kuhn and the Nature of Science. MIT Press. pp. 275--310.
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  26. Language, Truth and Reason.Ian Hacking - 1982 - In Martin Hollis & Steven Lukes (eds.), Rationality and Relativism. MIT Press. pp. 48--66.
     
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  27. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition.Thomas S. Kuhn & Ian Hacking - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. _The Structure of Scientific Revolutions _is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty (...)
     
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  28. Why is There Philosophy of Mathematics AT ALL?Ian Hacking - 2011 - South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):1-15.
    Mathematics plays an inordinate role in the work of many of famous Western philosophers, from the time of Plato, through Husserl and Wittgenstein, and even to the present. Why? This paper points to the experience of learning or making mathematics, with an emphasis on proof. It distinguishes two sources of the perennial impact of mathematics on philosophy. They are classified as Ancient and Enlightenment. Plato is emblematic of the former, and Kant of the latter. The Ancient fascination arises from the (...)
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  29.  25
    The Essential Tension. Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change.Ian Hacking & Thomas S. Kuhn - 1979 - History and Theory 18 (2):223.
  30. Slightly More Realistic Personal Probability.Ian Hacking - 1967 - Philosophy of Science 34 (4):311-325.
    A person required to risk money on a remote digit of π would, in order to comply fully with the theory [of personal probability] have to compute that digit, though this would really be wasteful if the cost of computation were more than the prize involved. For the postulates of the theory imply that you should behave in accordance with the logical implications of all that you know. Is it possible to improve the theory in this respect, making allowance within (...)
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  31. Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy.Ian Hacking - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):137-148.
    Bernard Williams’ last book is the most interesting set of reflections on the values of truth and truth-telling in living memory. Its grasp of philosophical arguments is astonishing. In many cases it is rightly speedy: Three lines to set up an argument, two to demolish it, three to revive it, a total of perhaps thirty lines to set the whole matter to rights. The book manages to be both learned and passionate without being pretentious. And of course witty; some will (...)
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  32.  64
    The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusion by Philip Kitcher. [REVIEW]Ian Hacking - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):212-215.
  33. Possibility.Ian Hacking - 1967 - Philosophical Review 76 (2):143-168.
  34. How Inevitable Are the Results of Successful Science?Ian Hacking - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):71.
    Obviously we could have failed to be successful scientists. But a serious question lurks beneath the banal one stated in my title. If the results of a scientific investigation are correct, would any investigation of roughly the same subject matter, if successful, at least implicitly contain or imply the same results? Using examples ranging from immunology to high-energy physics, the paper presents the cases for both positive and negative answers. The paper is deliberately non-conclusive, arguing that the question is one (...)
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  35. Introductory Essay.Ian Hacking - 2012 - In Thomas S. Kuhn (ed.), The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. University of Chicago Press.
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  36. The Disunities of the Sciences.Ian Hacking - 1996 - In Peter Galison & David Stump (eds.), The Disunity of Science. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. pp. 37-74.
     
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  37. The Identity of Indiscernibles.Ian Hacking - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (9):249-256.
  38. The Making and Molding of Child Abuse.Ian Hacking - 1991 - Critical Inquiry 17 (2):253-288.
    Some evil actions are public. Maybe genocide is the most awful. Other evil actions are private, a matter of one person harming another or of self-inflicted injury. Child abuse, in our current reckoning, is the worst of private evils. We want to put a stop to it. We know we can’t do that, not entirely. Human wickedness won’t go away. But we must protect as many children as we can. We want also to discover and help those who have already (...)
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  39. The Inverse Gambler's Fallacy: The Argument From Design. The Anthropic Principle Applied to Wheeler Universes.Ian Hacking - 1987 - Mind 96 (383):331-340.
  40. The Archaeology of Foucault.Ian Hacking - 1986 - In Michel Foucault & David Couzens Hoy (eds.), Foucault: A Critical Reader. Blackwell. pp. 27--40.
     
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  41. How We Have Been Learning to Talk About Autism: A Role for Stories.Ian Hacking - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):499-516.
  42. Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy?Ian Hacking - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    Many people find themselves dissatisfied with recent linguistic philosophy, and yet know that language has always mattered deeply to philosophy and must in some sense continue to do so. Ian Hacking considers here some dozen case studies in the history of philosophy to show the different ways in which language has been important, and the consequences for the development of the subject. There are chapters on, among others, Hobbes, Berkeley, Russell, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, Feyerabend and Davidson. Dr Hacking ends by (...)
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  43. Why is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All?Ian Hacking - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This truly philosophical book takes us back to fundamentals - the sheer experience of proof, and the enigmatic relation of mathematics to nature. It asks unexpected questions, such as 'what makes mathematics mathematics?', 'where did proof come from and how did it evolve?', and 'how did the distinction between pure and applied mathematics come into being?' In a wide-ranging discussion that is both immersed in the past and unusually attuned to the competing philosophical ideas of contemporary mathematicians, it shows that (...)
     
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  44. Let’s Not Talk About Objectivity.Ian Hacking - 2015 - In Jonathan Y. Tsou, Alan Richardson & Flavia Padovani (eds.), Objectivity in Science. Springer Verlag.
     
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  45.  30
    Against Method & Farewell to Reason by Paul Feyerabend. [REVIEW]Ian Hacking - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):219-223.
  46. Extragalactic Reality: The Case of Gravitational Lensing.Ian Hacking - 1989 - Philosophy of Science 56 (4):555-581.
    My Representing and Intervening (1983) concludes with what it calls an experimental argument for scientific realism about entities. The argument is evidently inapplicable to extragalactic astrophysics, but leaves open the possibility that there might be other grounds for scientific realism in that domain. Here I argue for antirealism in astrophysics, although not for any particular kind of antirealism. The argument is conducted by a detailed examination of some current research. It parallels the last chapter of (1983). Both represent the methodological (...)
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  47. On the Stability of the Laboratory Sciences.Ian Hacking - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (10):507-514.
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  48. Putnam's Theory of Natural Kinds and Their Names is Not the Same as Kripke's.Ian Hacking - 2007 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 11 (1):1-24.
    Philosophers have been referring to the “Kripke–Putnam” theory of naturalkind terms for over 30 years. Although there is one common starting point, the two philosophers began with different motivations and presuppositions, and developed in different ways. Putnam’s publications on the topic evolved over the decades, certainly clarifying and probably modifying his analysis, while Kripke published nothing after 1980. The result is two very different theories about natural kinds and their names. Both accept that the meaning of a naturalkind term is (...)
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  49. Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. The Pasteurization of France. Bruno Latour, Alan Sheridan, John Law.Ian Hacking - 1992 - Philosophy of Science 59 (3):510-512.
  50. The Contingencies of Ambiguity.Ian Hacking - 2007 - Analysis 67 (4):269–277.
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