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  1. The Mozi: A Complete Translation.Ian Johnston (ed.) - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    The _Mozi_ is a key philosophical work written by a major social and political thinker of the fifth century B.C.E. It is one of the few texts to survive the Warring States period and is crucial to understanding the origins of Chinese philosophy and two other foundational works, the _Mengzi_ and the _Xunzi_. Ian Johnston provides an English translation of the entire _Mozi_, as well as the first bilingual edition in any European language to be published in the West. His (...)
     
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  2.  56
    The Gongsun Longzi: A Translation and an Analysis of its Relationship to Later Mohist Writings.Ian Johnston - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):271–295.
  3.  23
    Choosing the Greater and Choosing the Lesser: A Translation and Analysis of the Daqu and Xiaoqu Chapters of the Mozi.Ian Johnston - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (4):375–407.
  4. Discourse on Method.Andrew R. Bailey & Ian Johnston (eds.) - 2016 - Broadview Press.
    Fully named _Discourse on the Method for Reasoning Well and for Seeking Truth in the Sciences_, this work offers the most complete presentation and defense of René Descartes’ method of intellectual inquiry— a method that greatly influenced both philosophical and scientific reasoning in the early modern world. Descartes’s timeless ideas strike an uncommon balance of novelty and familiarity, offering arguments concerning knowledge, science, and metaphysics that are as compelling in the 21st century as they were in the 17th. Ian Johnston’s (...)
     
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  5. Meditations on First Philosophy.Andrew R. Bailey & Ian Johnston (eds.) - 2013 - Broadview Press.
    Considered a foundational text in modern philosophy, the _Meditations on First Philosophy_ presents numerous powerful arguments that to this day influence debates in epistemology, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of religion. This new translation incorporates revisions from the second Latin edition and the later French translation to make Descartes’ reasoning as lucid and engaging as possible. Also included in this edition is a brief introduction to Descartes and the _Meditations_, revised and expanded from Andrew Bailey’s acclaimed anthology, _First (...)
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  6. Galen: On Diseases and Symptoms.Ian Johnston (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Galen's treatises on the classification and causation of diseases and symptoms are an important component of his prodigious oeuvre, forming a bridge between his theoretical works and his practical, clinical writings. As such, they remained an integral component of the medical teaching curriculum well into the second millennium. This edition was originally published in 2006. In these four treatises, Galen not only provides a framework for the exhaustive classification of diseases and their symptoms as a prelude to his analysis of (...)
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  7.  16
    Reply to Curie Virág.Ian Johnston & Ping Wang - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):589-590.
  8.  23
    Reply to Dan Robins’s Review.Ian Johnston - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):267-269.
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    Virtual Chalk: The Future of Work in Higher Education.Ian Johnston - 1999 - Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education 3 (1):28-33.
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  10. On Perpetual Peace.Brian Orend & Ian Johnston (eds.) - 2015 - Broadview Press.
    Kant’s landmark essay “On Perpetual Peace” is as timely, relevant, and inspiring today as when it was first written over 200 years ago. In it we find a forward-looking vision of a world respectful of human rights, dominated by liberal democracies, and united in a cosmopolitan federation of diverse peoples. The essay is an expression of global idealism that remains an enduring antidote to the violence and cynicism that are all too often on display in international relations and foreign affairs. (...)
     
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