Results for 'Ian Law'

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  1.  14
    Ethics and Law for the Health Professions.Ian Kerridge - 1998 - Social Science Press.
    Ethics and Law for the Health Professions is a cross-disciplinary medico-legal book whose previouseditions have been widely used in the medical world. This new 3rd edition (...) is fully revised with all ethics and law topics updated to reflect recent developments. New chapters include dealing specifically with children, health care and the environment, infectious diseases, public health, and ethics and chronic disease. All law sections have been extensively re-visited by Dr Cameron Stewart. Its special features are its focus on a clinically relevant approach, and its recognition that health care professionals are often confronted by legal issues and ethical issues at the same time. Health professionals have to satisfy both, and their legal advisers need to be aware of the dilemmas this can present. This book is careful to distinguish between ethics and law. Its chapters take account of all the health professions, and their differing responsibilities, and cover a very wide range of the issues they face. (shrink)
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  2.  24
    Natural Law as Political Philosophy.Ian Hunter - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press. pp. 475-499.
    Rather than a history of seventeenth-century natural law, then, this chapter offers an outline of several different contextual uses of the language of natural law, as (...)it was used in formulating the intellectual architecture for rival constructions of political and religious authority. (shrink)
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  3. Treat Me Right: Essays in Medical Law and Ethics.Ian Kennedy - 1988 - Clarendon Press.
    Controversial and amusing, this collection of Kennedy's writings illuminates the rights, duties, and liabilities of doctors as well as other aspects of medical law and ethics.
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  4.  32
    One Law for War and Peace? Judicial Review and Emergency Powers Between the Norm and the Exception.Ian Zuckerman - 2006 - Constellations 13 (4):522-545.
  5.  13
    The International Rule of Law: Law and the Limit of Politics.Ian Hurd - 2014 - Ethics and International Affairs 28 (1):39-51.
    The international rule of law is often seen as a centerpiece of the modern international order. It is routinely reaffirmed by governments, international organizations, scholars, and activists, (...)
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  6.  25
    Evidence, Logic, the Rule and the Exception in Renaissance Law and Medicine.Ian Maclean - 2000 - Early Science and Medicine 5 (3):227-256.
    This article sets out to investigate aspects of the uptake of Renaissance law and medicine from some of the logical and natural-philosophical components of the university (...)arts course. Medicine is shown to have a much laxer operative logic than law, reflecting its commitment to the theory of idiosyncrasy as opposed to the demands made upon the law by the need for a uniform application of justice. Symptomatic of the different uptake arc the contrasting meanings of "regulariter" and "generaliter" in the two disciplines. Whereas the law treats the rule as inviolable and the exception as only valid if made explicit in due legal form, medicine is able to conceive of a nature as a field of knowledge broader than that encompassed by its rules of art. Both law and medicine approach evidence. (shrink)
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  7.  96
    The Consistency of Physical Law with Divine Immanence.Ian J. Thompson - 1993 - Science and Christian Belief 5:19-36.
    A model is presented to show how the existence of physical law could be a reasonable consequence of Divine Immanence in the world of natural phenomena. Divine (...)
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  8.  20
    Three models of the international rule of law.Ian Hurd - 2015 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 23:37-48.
    While it is common to refer to the international rule of law, it is less common to define it or to explore what it means. In this (...)
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  9.  21
    Brouwer Wittgenstein on the Infinite and the Law of Excluded Middle.Ian Rumfitt - 2014 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 89 (1):93-108.
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  10.  12
    Law, Text, Terror.Ian Ward - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Ian Ward argues that through a closer appreciation of the ethical and aesthetical dimensions of terror, as well as the historical, political and cultural, we can better (...)
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  11. Does the Solar System Compute the Laws of Motion?Douglas Ian Campbell & Yi Yang - 2019 - Synthese 198 (4):3203-3220.
    The counterfactual account of physical computation is simple and, for the most part, very attractive. However, it is usually thought to trivialize the notion of physical computation (...)
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  12. The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice.Ian James Kidd, José Medina & Gaile Pohlhaus (eds.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    In the era of information and communication, issues of misinformation and miscommunication are more pressing than ever. _Epistemic injustice - _one of the most important and ground-breaking (...)
     
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  13.  10
    Does Natural Law Have Non-Normative Foundations?Ian Gold - 2002 - Sophia 41 (1):1-17.
    This paper addresses one aspect of the natural law theory of Germain Grisez. According to Grisez, practical reason identifies the goods of human life prior to the (...)
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  14.  46
    Is Humanitarian Intervention Legal? The Rule of Law in an Incoherent World.Ian Hurd - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):293-313.
    The legality of humanitarian intervention is essentially indeterminate. No amount of debate over the law or recent cases will resolve its status; it is both legal and (...)
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  15.  50
    How the Laws of Economics Lie.Ian Hunt - 2001 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):119–133.
  16.  6
    Tripartism: Regulatory Capture andEmpowerment, 16 Law Soc.Ian Ayres& John Braithwaite - 1991 - Law and Social Inquiry 16 (3):437-39.
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  17.  10
    Law and Literature: A Feminist Perspective[REVIEW]Ian Ward - 1994 - Feminist Legal Studies 2 (2):133-158.
  18. A Discursive Approach to Therapy with Men.Ian Law - 1999 - In Ian Parker (ed.), Deconstructing Psychotherapy. Sage Publications. pp. 115--131.
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  19.  6
    Book Reviews of "Digital Libraries", "From Gutenberg To The Global Information Infrastructure: Access To Information In The Networked World", and "Inside Book Publishing". [REVIEW]Derek Law & Ian McGowan - 2001 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 12 (1):52-55.
  20.  18
    : Law and Literature: Possibilities and Perspectives. Ian Ward. ; Law and Literature Perspectives. Bruce L. Rockwood. ; Law's Stories: Narrative and Rhetoric in the Law. Peter Brooks, Paul Gewirtz.Julie Stone Peters - 1997 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 9 (2):259-274.
  21.  7
    William Ian Miller, Audun and the Polar Bear: Luck, Law, and Largesse in a Medieval Tale of Risky Business.(Medieval Law and Its Practice, 1.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008. Pp. Xi, 155.€ 89[REVIEW]Tim William Machan - 2010 - Speculum 85 (1):177-178.
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  22. A Measure of Freedom.Ian Carter (ed.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    How do we know when one person or society is 'freer' than another? Can freedom be measured? Is more freedom better than less? This book provides the (...)
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  23.  4
    Reading for Law and the State: Theaters of Problematization and Authority[REVIEW]Ian W. Duncanson - 2009 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (3):321-342.
    Constructing a particular nation, that of early modern England, is seen here as a series of theatrical performances. Shakespeares work is taken as a series of (...)thought experiments. Some, like The Merchant of Venice, are reassuring that threatening circumstances and innovatory social practices are capable of being overcome or assimilated from the unknown to the known. Some, like King Lear and Hamlet, ponder the consequences of a failure to discover a resolution. Some writers have argued that England was historically quite early in beginning to conceive of itself as a nation, rather than as a population of possibly heterogeneous regions subject to a dynasty, a state of affairs summarized in the by now clichéd remark attributed to the Sun King, “LEtat, cest moi”. For Shakespeare, if not for all of his contemporaries, the Englishman is a bit slow-witted, owing to his fondness for beef and red wine, but he is distinguishable from others and provides material for the second pieces of theater I look at. If there could be an Englishman, his experience with the absolutist pretensions of the Stuart monarchy allowed there to be a free-born Englishman (and, actually, Englishwoman). The two crucial battles of the English civil war, Marston Moor and Naseby, followed by the Army Debates of 16471649 form the stage for an at least aspiring egalitarianism we now know as the rights of man, or the rights of the civic person. (shrink)
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  24.  13
    Public Law and the Limits of Philosophy: German Idealism and the Religious Constitution.Ian Hunter - 2018 - Critical Inquiry 44 (3):528-553.
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  25.  17
    Law and Literature in Medieval Iceland: "Ljósvetninga Saga" and "Valla-Ljóts Saga". Theodore M. Andersson, William Ian Miller.Jenny Jochens - 1992 - Speculum 67 (1):100-102.
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  26.  20
    Vattel's Law of Nations: Diplomatic Casuistry for the Protestant Nation.Ian Hunter - 2010 - Grotiana 31 (1):108-140.
    This paper argues that Vattel's Droit des gens cannot be adequately interpreted as based on a philosophical principle, whether of universal justice or of raison d'état (...). Rather, Vattel unfolds his law of nations within a casuistical discourse where inconsistent principles are deployed strategically. This forms an ethical space in which universal justice can be continuously adapted to the exigencies of national self-interest as interpreted by the diplomat of a Protestant republican nation. (shrink)
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  27.  19
    God, Terror and Law.Ian Ward - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (4):783-796.
  28.  7
    The Plenary Council and Canon Law.Ian Waters - 2018 - The Australasian Catholic Record 95 (4):399.
    Waters, Ian The Australian hierarchy was established by Pope Gregory XVI in 1842. Since then, there have been six national Catholic councils held in Australia. The first (...)
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  29.  10
    Mr Hobbes Goes to Australia: Law, Politics and Difference.Ian Duncanson - 2000 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 13 (3):279-303.
    Using current conservative discourses about the nation state in Australia as an example,the paper notices how the image of the (male-sexed) body is used to enhance (...) theauthority of the same (white ``neutral'' agents of largely foreign capital)against the claims of difference (non-white refugees, women, Aboriginal people).The paper notices that far from protecting minority and difference, as liberalismleads one to expect, the law uses the same body image of itself to repeat theoppression. Legal education inscribes the masculinity of the phallus in thebodies and minds of its students. Other masculinity, the female, the``native'' are identified by the law rather than self-identifiedin the law after negotiation with the law. (shrink)
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  30.  12
    Book Review: Melanie Williams, Empty Justice: OneHundred Years of Law, Literature andPhilosophy[REVIEW]Ian Ward - 2003 - Feminist Legal Studies 11 (1):85-88.
  31. Kant's Legal Metaphor and the Nature of a Deduction.Ian Proops - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2):209-229.
    This essay partly builds on and partly criticizes a striking idea of Dieter Henrich. Henrich argues that Kant's distinction in the first Critique between the question (...)of fact (quid facti) and the question of law (quid juris) provides clues to the argumentative structure of a philosophical "Deduction". Henrich suggests that the unity of apperception plays a role analogous to a legal factum. By contrast, I argue, first, that the question of fact in the first Critique is settled by the Metaphysical Deduction, which establishes the purity of origin of the Categories, and, second, that in the second Critique, the relevant factum is the Fact of Reason, which amounts to the fact that the Moral Law is pure in origin. (shrink)
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  32. ITruth and Meaning.Ian Rumfitt - 2014 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):21-55.
    Should we explicate truth in terms of meaning, or meaning in terms of truth? Ramsey, Prior and Strawson all favoured the former approach: a statement is true (...)
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  33. On A Neglected Path to Intuitionism.Ian Rumfitt - 2012 - Topoi 31 (1):101-109.
    According to Quine, in any disagreement over basic logical laws the contesting parties must mean different things by the connectives or quantifiers implicated in those laws; when (...)
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  34.  7
    Science and Law. Tal Golan, Snait Gissis.Ian Burney - 2001 - Isis 92 (2):437-438.
  35.  6
    Flawed Like Us and the Starry Moral Law: Review of Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan[REVIEW]Tae Wan Kim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):875-879.
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  36. The Tractatus on Inference and Entailment.Ian Proops - 2002 - In Erich Reck (ed.), From Frege to Wittgenstein: Essays on Early Analytic Philosophy, 283–307. Oxford University Press.
    In the Tractatus Wittgenstein criticizes Frege and Russell's view that laws of inference (Schlussgesetze) "justify" logical inferences. What lies behind this criticism, I argue, is (...)
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  37. The Clinic and the Court: Law, Medicine and Anthropology.Ian Harper, Tobias Kelly & Akshay Khanna (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Law and medicine can be caught in a tight embrace. They both play a central role in the politics of harm, making decisions regarding what counts as (...)
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  38.  20
    From Literature to Ethics: The Strategies and Ambitions of Law and Literature.Ian Ward - 1994 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 14 (3):389-400.
  39.  27
    An Anatomy of Thought the Origin and Machinery of Mind.Ian Glynn - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Love, fear, hope, calculus, and game shows-how do all these spring from a few delicate pounds of meat? Neurophysiologist Ian Glynn lays the foundation for answering (...)this question in his expansive An Anatomy of Thought, but stops short of committing to one particular theory. The book is a pleasant challenge, presenting the reader with the latest research and thinking about neuroscience and how it relates to various models of consciousness. Combining the aim of a textbook with the style of a popularization, it provides all the lay reader needs to know to participate in the philosophical debate that is redefining our attitudes about our minds. Drawing on the rich history of neurological case studies, Glynn picks through the building blocks of our nervous system, examines our visual and linguistic systems, and probes deeply into our higher thought processes. The stories of great scientists, like Ramon y Cajal, and famous patients, like Sperry's split-brained epileptics, illuminate the scientific issues Glynn selects as essential for understanding consciousness. Some might argue that his lengthy explorations of natural selection overemphasize evolutionary explanations of psychological phenomena, but they must also agree that evolutionary psychology has distanced itself mightily from social Darwinism in recent years and merits a reappraisal. The great consciousness debate may form the core of the 21st-century Zeitgeist; get ready for it with An Anatomy of Thought. -Rob Lightner From Publishers Weekly How do we know? What do we think? How could a philosophical problem-'the mind-body problem,' say-induce a headache? What can evolutionary theory, molecular biology, the history of medicine and experimental psychology tell us about the features of human consciousness, and (once again) how do we know? Glynn, a physician and Cambridge University professor, meticulously attempts to answer these questions and more, setting forth the results of all sorts of research relevant to our brains-from 19th-century dissections to Oliver Sacks-like case studies, work with monkeys and supercomputers, and the enduring puzzles of philosophy, which he rightly saves for near the end. After explaining evolution by natural selection and 'clearing away much dross,' Glynn lays out the experiments and theories that have shown 'how nerve cells can carry information about the body, how they can interact' and how sense organs work; demonstrates the 'mixture of parallel and hierarchical organization' in our brains and 'the striking localization of function within it'; considers where neuroscience is likely to go; and admits that, among the many fields of exciting research just ahead, 'we can be least confident of progress toward a complete, scientific explanation of our sensations and thoughts and feelings.' Other recent explaining-the-brain books have sometimes advanced simplistic, or implausibly grand, claims about the nature and features of consciousness in general. Instead, Glynn offers a patient, informative, well-laid-out researcher's-eye view of what we have learned, how we figured it out and what we still don't know about neurons, senses, feelings, brains and minds. (Apr.) Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Library Journal The nature of consciousness, which perennially troubles the minds of scientists and philosophers, is the subject of an ever-growing body of literature. Two of the latest entries approach the topic from different perspectives. Glynn, a professor of physiology and head of the Physiological Laboratory at Cambridge, offers a comprehensive summary of what we know about the brain-both its evolution and its mechanisms. Among the topics he covers are natural selection, molecular evolution, nerves and the nervous system, sensory perception, and the specific structures responsible for our intellect. Using the mechanisms involved in vision and speech as models, Glynn skillfully describes various neurological deficiencies that can lead to 'disordered seeing' and problems with the use of language. He carefully distinguishes what we know through experimental evidence from what we know through the observation of patients with neurological damage. He also describes some of the major theories that attempt to explain why these structures arose. While his book concentrates on the structures that make up the mind, Glynn is well aware that some physical events appear explicable only in terms of conscious mental events-a situation that conflicts with the laws of modern physics. Only briefly, however, does he consider the various approaches that have been taken to deal with the issues of mind/body and free will. In contrast, this is the primary focus of The Physics of Consciousness. After reviewing the fundamentals of classic physics, Walker (who has a Ph.D. in physics) summarizes elements of the new physics in which our knowledge of space, time, matter, and energy are all dependent on the moment of observation. Walker explores the meaning of consciousness as a characteristic of the observer. In this context both the observer and the act of measurement are critical. In essence, Walker leads his reader on a journey through his concept of a 'quantum mind,' which can both affect matter (including other minds) and can be affected by other distant matter/minds. To break up what would otherwise be an extremely dense text, Walker also relates the very touching story of the loss of his high-school sweetheart to leukemia. Indeed, it is his memory of their relationship that drives Walker to seek an understanding of ultimate reality. At times, he has a tendency to be dogmatic-as when he concludes, 'our consciousness, our mind, and the will of God are the same mind.' While An Anatomy of Thought is appropriate for most academic libraries, the Physics of Consciousness will be most accessible to readers with some knowledge of advanced physics. -Laurie Bartolini, Illinois State Lib., Springfield Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Booklist The codiscoverers of natural selection-Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace-disagreed over the possibility of finding an evolutionary explanation for the human mind. Glynn here argues Darwin's side of the debate, tracing an eons-long path of development starting from simple amino acids floating in primal seas and extending through the erect hominids in which the powers of a massive brain first manifest themselves. Patiently adducing evidence of an evolutionary origin for the underlying molecular machinery, Glynn dissects the nerve centers that make possible speech and hearing, sight, and reading. Pressing deeper, he lays bare the cortical foundations of personality. But those who deal with the mind must attend also to the arguments advanced by philosophers. And it is when he turns from dendrites to syllogisms (especially the vexing mind-body paradox) that Glynn's empirical reasoning fails him. In the end, he concedes his perplexity in trying to conceive of an evolutionary origin for human consciousness. This concession may set the shade of Alfred Wallace to chortling, but it will draw readers into an honest confrontation with a profound enigma. Bryce Christensen. (shrink)
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  40.  8
    The Impact of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs on U.S. Opioid Prescriptions.Ian Ayres & Amen Jalal - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):387-403.
    This paper seeks to understand the treatment effect of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs on opioid prescription rates. Using county-level panel data on all opioid prescriptions in (...)the U.S. between 2006 and 2015, we investigate whether state interventions like PDMPs have heterogeneous treatment effects at the sub-state level, based on regional and temporal variations in policy design, extent of urbanization, race, and income. Our models comprehensively control for a set of county and time fixed effects, countyspecific and time-varying demographic controls, potentially endogenous time-series trends in prescription rates, and other state-level opioid interventions such as Naloxone Access and Good Samaritan laws, Medicaid expansion, and the provision of Methadone Assistance Treatment. We find that PDMPs are only effective in reducing prescription rates if they obligate doctors to check for patients' history prior to filling out a prescription, but the frequency at which a state requires its PDMP to be updated is irrelevant to its effectiveness. Moreover, the significant treatment effects of PDMPs are almost exclusively driven by urban and predominantly white counties, with the relatively more affluent regions showing greater responsiveness than their less affluent counterparts. (shrink)
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  41. The Authority of the German Religious Constitution: Public Law, Philosophy, and Democracy.Ian Hunter - unknown
    The present religious constitution of the Federal Republic of Germany is the product of protracted historical conflicts and political settlements that began in the sixteenth century. The (...)
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  42.  44
    Secularization: The Birth of a Modern Combat Concept.Ian Hunter - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History 12 (1):1-32.
    This paper argues that todays dominant understanding of secularizationas an epochal transition from a society based on religious belief to one based on autonomous human (...)
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  43. Elegance in Science: The Beauty of Simplicity.Ian Glynn - 2010 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The idea of elegance in science is not necessarily a familiar one, but it is an important one. The use of the term is perhaps most clear- (...)cut in mathematics - the elegant proof - and this is where Ian Glynn begins his exploration. Scientists often share a sense of admiration and excitement on hearing of an elegant solution to a problem, an elegant theory, or an elegant experiment. The idea of elegance may seem strange in a field of endeavour that prides itself in its objectivity, but only if science is regarded as a dull, dry activity of counting and measuring. It is, of course, far more than that, and elegance is a fundamental aspect of the beauty and imagination involved in scientific activity. Ian Glynn, a distinguished scientist, selects historical examples from a range of sciences to draw out the principles of science, including Kepler's Laws, the experiments that demonstrated the nature of heat, and the action of nerves, and of course the several extraordinary episodes that led to Watson and Crick's discovery of the structure of DNA. With a highly readable selection of inspiring episodes highlighting the role of beauty and simplicity in the sciences, the book also relates to important philosophical issues of inference, and Glynn ends by warning us not to rely on beauty and simplicity alone - even the most elegant explanation can be wrong. (shrink)
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  44.  3
    A Lawyer's View of the Natural Law.Ian Hamnett - 1961 - New Blackfriars 42 (495):370-377.
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  45.  10
    Bloodtaking and Peacemaking: Feud, Law, and Society in Saga Iceland.William Ian Miller.Geoffrey Koziol - 1993 - Speculum 68 (3):842-844.
  46. Global Justice and Regional Metaphysics: On the Critical History of the Law of Nature and Nations.Ian Hunter - manuscript
    Early modern natural law and the law of nations has been criticised for the Eurocentric character of its conception of law and justice, which has been in (...)
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  47.  41
    Coercive Care Rights, Law and Policy Ed. by Bernadette McSherry, Ian Freckleton.Neil Pickering - 2014 - Asian Bioethics Review 6 (3):320-324.
  48.  27
    Educating Children to Comply with Laws.Ian Macmullen - 2013 - Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (1):106-124.
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  49. How "Natural'' Are "Kinds'' of Sexual Orientation?Ian Hacking - 2002 - Law and Philosophy 21 (1):95-107.
  50.  18
    Tristan Sharp, Ed., From Learning to Love: School, Law, and Pastoral Care in the Middle Ages; Essays in Honour of Joseph W. Goering, with Isabelle Cochelin, Greti Dinkova-Bruun, Abigail Firey, and Giulio Silano. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2017. Pp. Xlviii, 775; 13 Color Plates. $110. ISBN: 978-0-88844-829-3.Table of Contents Available Online at Http://Www.Pims.Ca/Publications/New-and-Recent-Titles/Publication/From-Learning-to-Love-Schools-Law-and-Pastoral-Care-in-the-Middle-Agesessays-in-Honour-of-Joseph-W-Goering[REVIEW]Ian P. Wei - 2019 - Speculum 94 (3):900-901.
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