Order:
Disambiguations
Ian Leask [21]Ian Albert Leask [1]
  1.  32
    Unholy Force: Toland's Leibnizian 'Consummation' of Spinozism.Ian Leask - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):499-537.
    This article argues that the Fourth and Fifth of John Toland's Letters to Serena are best understood as a creative confrontation of Spinoza and Leibniz ? one in which crucial aspects of Leibniz's thought are extracted from their original context and made to serve a purpose that is ultimately Spinozistic. Accordingly, it suggests that the critique of Spinoza that takes up so much of the fourth Letter, in particular, should be read as a means of `perfecting' Spinoza (via Leibniz), rather (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  8
    Only Natural: John Toland and the Jewish Question.Ian Leask - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (4):515-528.
  3.  28
    Beyond Subjection: Notes on the Later Foucault and Education.Ian Leask - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s1):57-73.
    This article argues against the doxa that Foucault's analysis of education inevitably undermines self-originating ethical intention on the part of teachers or students. By attending to Foucault's lesser known, later work—in particular, the notion of ‘biopower’ and the deepened level of materiality it entails—the article shows how the earlier Foucauldian conception of power is intensified to such an extent that it overflows its original domain, and comes to ‘infuse’ the subject that might previously have been taken as a mere effect. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  28
    Personation and Immanent Undermining: On Toland's Appearing Lockean.Ian Leask - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):231 – 256.
  5.  31
    Ideology and the ‘Multitude of the Classroom’: Spinoza and Althusser at School.Ian Leask - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):858-867.
    This paper approaches the question of Spinoza and education via the work of Louis Althusser. One important aim is to show how Spinoza’s description of the imagination underpins Althusser’s description of the ideological ‘infrastructure’ of educational practices and institutions. To achieve this, I begin by addressing Spinoza’s treatment of the physiological foundation of the imagination: by showing that the realm of ‘individual consciousness’ is more like the effect of an anonymous field, or process, Spinoza, we see, becomes a kind of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  24
    Was There a Theological Turn in Phenomenology?Ian Leask - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):149-162.
    This article examines the possibility that phenomenology was “always already” a theological enterprise, by outlining some of the foundational criticisms levelled by Michel Foucault and Louis Althusser. For both thinkers, the phenomenological stress on “lived experience” grants an undue primacy to the realm of “interiority”; as a result, subjectivity is left, not just reified, but also deified. By contrast, both Foucault and Althusser will argue for understanding the subject as constituted rather than constitutive; philosophy’s task, accordingly, is to delineate the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  26
    Ethics Overcomes Finitude: Levinas, Kant, and the Davos Legacy.Ian Leask - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):447-459.
    This article situates Levinas’s reading of Kant in terms of his opposition to Heidegger. It suggests that, although Levinas and Heidegger both put great stress upon the affective aspect of Kant’s philosophy, ultimately they diverge sharply over the issue of finitude: where Heidegger’s Kant suggests that there is “nothing but finite Dasein,” Levinas stresses the significance of transcending finitude, ethically. In this respect, Levinas’s Kant-reading converges strongly with the interpretation Heidegger so strongly opposed—Cassirer’s. And, as such, Levinas’s anti-Heideggerian position commits (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  1
    Being Reconfigured.Ian Albert Leask - 2011 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Being Reconfigured presents some of the most brilliant and audacious theses in recent phenomenological research. Challenging so much post-Heideggerian doxa, it argues against contemporary phenomenology’s denegation of Being, but suggests, as well, that phenomenology itself can provide a viable and fruitful alternative to this impasse. -/- Specifically, Being Reconfigured delineates the source of phenomenology’s ‘refusal’ of Being, in Husserl; the main strands it demonstrates, in Marion and Levinas; and the fundamental problems its entails—in Marion, the necessary retention of a ‘metaphysical’ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Schelling: Art and the Limits of Philosophy.Ian Leask - 2005 - Yearbook of the Irish Philosophical Society:165-174.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Statuary Presence: Phaedrus 235d – 236b.Ian Leask - 2001 - Yearbook of the Irish Philosophical Society:96-102.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  6
    From Serena to Hypatia: John Toland's Women.Ian Leask - 2020 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 88:195-214.
    This paper focusses on John Toland's influential Hypatia, an account of the neo-Platonist philosopher and mathematician murdered in ancient Alexandria; it also considers segments of his Letters to Serena, and suggests various conjunctions between the two texts which confirm Toland's genuine and sustained feminist commitment. As I try to establish, Toland's concern is as much about contemporaneous events as it is about ‘disinterested’ history: by promoting Hypatia as the representative of philosophy in its perennial struggle with superstition and priestcraft, Toland (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  52
    Husserl, Givenness, and the Priority of the Self.Ian Leask - 2003 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (2):141-156.
    This article argues that, despite its apparent radicality, Husserl's later, genetic phenomenology ends up confirming and consolidating a very orthodox transcendental egology.First, the article reconstructs an Husserlian phenomenology of givenness; but then, by considering the ambiguous role of intuition, it also establishes (a) the continued prestige of a 'classical' transcendental subject, and (b) the way in which a denial of ontology allows Husserl's transcendental subject to sublate the provocative challenge of primal Gegebenheit .Overall, the article argues that Husserl is subject (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  16
    From Radical Hermeneutics to the Weakness Of God: John D. Caputo in Dialogue with Mark Dooley.Ian Leask - 2007 - Philosophy Today 51 (2):216-226.
  14.  23
    Levinas and the Greek Tradition.Ian Leask - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):681-687.
  15.  15
    Stoicism Unbound: Cicero’s Academica in Toland’s Pantheisticon.Ian Leask - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):223-243.
    This article shows how and why John Toland’s Pantheisticon presents a version of Stoicism that locates Stoic ethics in terms of its ‘original’, naturalistic, foundation and devoid of any reconciliation with Christianity. As the article demonstrates, Toland’s account – based on Cicero’s Academica – stands opposed to the Christianized version of Stoicism that had dominated so much seventeenth-century discourse: in effect, Toland restores the materialism that was incompatible with neo-Stoicism. Furthermore, the article also suggests that this ‘restoration’ can be taken (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  6
    Flesh, Chiasm…Providence?Ian Leask - 2006 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 37 (1):5-20.
  17.  2
    Contra Fundamental Ontology.Ian Leask - 2004 - Maynooth Philosophical Papers 2:51-58.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  2
    First Impressions Reconsidered.Ian Leask - 2007 - Maynooth Philosophical Papers 4:17-22.
    This article investigates an intriguing ambivalence in Levinas’s reading of Husserl’s phenomenology of internal-time consciousness. The article focuses on the specific treatment of the Husserlian ‘proto-impression’, suggesting that one aspect of Levinas’s approach may serve to undermine, or even ‘un-say’, its better known counterpart.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  5
    Levinas and the Greek Tradition. [REVIEW]Ian Leask - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):681-687.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  8
    Edith Stein and Others.Ian Leask - 2002 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 33 (3):286-298.
  21.  3
    Postmodernism Pace Postmodernity?Ian Leask - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1481-1482.
  22.  3
    The Crossing of the Visible, by Jean-Luc Marion.Ian Leask - 2007 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (3):331-333.