13 found
Order:
  1.  33
    What is Language and How Could It Have Evolved?Martin B. H. Everaert, Marinus A. C. Huybregts, Robert C. Berwick, Noam Chomsky, Ian Tattersall, Andrea Moro & Johan J. Bolhuis - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (8):569-571.
  2.  10
    The Minimalist Program and the Origin of Language: A View From Paleoanthropology.Ian Tattersall - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  3.  42
    Language Origins: An Evolutionary Framework.Ian Tattersall - 2018 - Topoi 37 (2):289-296.
    Opinions have varied wildly as to whether the roots of language run extremely deep in the human lineage, or, alternatively, whether this unprecedented capacity is a recent acquisition. The question has been exacerbated by the fact that language itself does not preserve, so that its possession by earlier hominids has had to be inferred from indirect material proxies. Here I argue that while most technological putative proxies from the Paleolithic are certainly evidence of highly complex cognitive states among our precursors, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Evolution, Genes, and Behavior.Ian Tattersall - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):657-666.
  5.  13
    How assumptions shape the paleosciences.Ian Tattersall - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):39.
    Science is a very special form of storytelling, one in which the stories told have to be testable against empirical observation. But the world is a complicated place; and, to provide a coherent account of it, scientists often find themselves obliged to join up their observable dots using untestable or as-yet-untested lines. This is a necessary part of constructing many valuable and predictive scientific scenarios; and it is perfectly good procedure as long as the assumptions involved are fully compatible with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Theory and Technology in the Future of Paleoanthropology.Ian Tattersall - 2009 - Ludus Vitalis 17 (32):455-458.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. How Did Modern Human Cognition Evolve?Ian Tattersall - 2007 - In Henri Cohen & Brigitte Stemmer (eds.), Consciousness and Cognition: Fragments of Mind and Brain. Elxevier Academic Press.
  8.  7
    Evolution and Human Cognition.Ian Tattersall - 2019 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 12 (2):11-18.
    There can be no reasonable doubt that our living species Homo sapiens is fully integrated into the great Tree of Life that unites all living organisms on this planet. But it is also obvious that we are not just another run-of-the mill primate. But what distinguishes us most strongly from those relatives – and all other organisms – is something more abstract: the unusual and unprecedented way in which we process information in our minds. That is not so in our (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Classification and Phylogeny in Human Evolution.Ian Tattersall - 2001 - Ludus Vitalis 9 (15):137-142.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  12
    Origin of the Human Sense of Self.Ian Tattersall - 2011 - In J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen & Erik P. Wiebe (eds.), In Search of Self: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Personhood. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co.. pp. 33.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  6
    The Physiological Basis of the Fine Arts: A TheoryArt and Anatomy of Archaic Egypt: The Shen Principle Explained, with FormulasA Concise History of the Stereometry and the Body Measures, According to the Contemporary Sources, From Archaic Egypt to the Viking Age.Ian Tattersall, Kent R. Weeks & Bent Otte Grandjean - 1971 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (2):294.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  7
    Human Cognition.Ian Tattersall - 2004 - In Alberto Peruzzi (ed.), Mind and Causality. John Benjamins. pp. 55--131.
  13.  2
    How assumptions shape the paleosciences.Ian Tattersall - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-11.
    Science is a very special form of storytelling, one in which the stories told have to be testable against empirical observation. But the world is a complicated place; and, to provide a coherent account of it, scientists often find themselves obliged to join up their observable dots using untestable or as-yet-untested lines. This is a necessary part of constructing many valuable and predictive scientific scenarios; and it is perfectly good procedure as long as the assumptions involved are fully compatible with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark