Results for 'Icon'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  98
    Arbitrariness, Iconicity, and Systematicity in Language.Mark Dingemanse, Damián E. Blasi, Gary Lupyan, Morten H. Christiansen & Padraic Monaghan - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):603-615.
    The notion that the form of a word bears an arbitrary relation to its meaning accounts only partly for the attested relations between form and meaning in the languages of the world. Recent research suggests a more textured view of vocabulary structure, in which arbitrariness is complemented by iconicity (aspects of form resemble aspects of meaning) and systematicity (statistical regularities in forms predict function). Experimental evidence suggests these form-to-meaning correspondences serve different functions in language processing, development, and communication: systematicity facilitates (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  2. Is Iconic Memory Iconic?Jake Quilty‐Dunn - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 101 (3):660-682.
    Short‐term memory in vision is typically thought to divide into at least two memory stores: a short, fragile, high‐capacity store known as iconic memory, and a longer, durable, capacity‐limited store known as visual working memory (VWM). This paper argues that iconic memory stores icons, i.e., image‐like perceptual representations. The iconicity of iconic memory has significant consequences for understanding consciousness, nonconceptual content, and the perception–cognition border. Steven Gross and Jonathan Flombaum have recently challenged the division between iconic memory and VWM by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  65
    From Icons to Symbols: Some Speculations on the Origins of Language. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon & Norbert Hornstein - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (2):169-189.
    This paper is divided into three sections. In the first section we offer a retooling of some traditional concepts, namely icons and symbols, which allows us to describe an evolutionary continuum of communication systems. The second section consists of an argument from theoretical biology. In it we explore the advantages and disadvantages of phenotypic plasticity. We argue that a range of the conditions that selectively favor phenotypic plasticity also favor a nongenetic transmission system that would allow for the inheritance of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  4. Iconicity and the Format of Perception.Jake Quilty-Dunn - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (3-4):255-263.
    According to one important proposal, the difference between perception and cognition consists in the representational formats used in the two systems (Carey, 2009; Burge, 2010; Block, 2014). In particular, it is claimed that perceptual representations are iconic, or image-like, while cognitive representations are discursive, or language-like. Taking object perception as a test case, this paper argues on empirical grounds that it requires discursive label-like representations. These representations segment the perceptual field, continuously pick out objects despite changes in their features, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  5.  61
    Iconic Variables.Philippe Schlenker, Jonathan Lamberton & Mirko Santoro - 2013 - Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (2):91-149.
    We argue that some sign language loci (i.e. positions in signing space that realize discourse referents) are both formal variables and simplified representations of what they denote; in other words, they are simultaneously logical symbols and pictorial representations. We develop a 'formal semantics with iconicity' that accounts for their dual life; the key idea ('formal iconicity') is that some geometric properties of signs must be preserved by the interpretation function. We analyze in these terms three kinds of iconic effects in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  6. Iconicity in the Lab: A Review of Behavioral, Developmental, and Neuroimaging Research Into Sound-Symbolism.Gwilym Lockwood & Mark Dingemanse - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:1-14.
    This review covers experimental approaches to sound-symbolism—from infants to adults, and from Sapir’s foundational studies to twenty-first century product naming. It synthesizes recent behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging work into a systematic overview of the cross-modal correspondences that underpin iconic links between form and meaning. It also identifies open questions and opportunities, showing how the future course of experimental iconicity research can benefit from an integrated interdisciplinary perspective. Combining insights from psychology and neuroscience with evidence from natural languages provides us with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  7.  40
    Iconic Representation: Maps, Pictures, and Perception.Tyler Burge - 2018 - In Wuppuluri Shyam & Francisco Antonio Dorio (eds.), The Map and the Territory: Exploring the Foundations of Science, Thought and Reality. Springer. pp. 79-100.
    Maps and realist pictures comprise prominent sub-classes of iconic representations. The most basic, most important sub-class is perception. Other types are drawings, photographs, musical notations, diagrams, bar graphs, abacuses, hieroglyphs, and color chits.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8.  19
    Iconic Features.Philippe Schlenker - 2014 - Natural Language Semantics 22 (4):299-356.
    Sign languages are known to display the same general grammatical properties as spoken languages, but also to make greater use of iconic mechanisms. In Schlenker et al.’s ‘Iconic Variables’ :91–149, 2013), it was argued that loci can have an iconic semantics, in the sense that certain geometric relations among loci are preserved by the interpretation function. Here we ask whether plural and height specifications of loci display the formal behavior of phi-features in remaining uninterpreted in focus- and ellipsis-constructions. Data from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  21
    Iconicity and the Emergence of Combinatorial Structure in Language.Tessa Verhoef, Simon Kirby & Bart Boer - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):1969-1994.
    In language, recombination of a discrete set of meaningless building blocks forms an unlimited set of possible utterances. How such combinatorial structure emerged in the evolution of human language is increasingly being studied. It has been shown that it can emerge when languages culturally evolve and adapt to human cognitive biases. How the emergence of combinatorial structure interacts with the existence of holistic iconic form-meaning mappings in a language is still unknown. The experiment presented in this paper studies the role (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10.  19
    Iconic Prosody in Story Reading.Marcus Perlman, Nathaniel Clark & Marlene Johansson Falck - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1348-1368.
    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance. This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that contrasted along concrete and abstract semantic dimensions of speed and size. Participants read fast stories at a faster rate than slow stories, and big stories with a lower pitch than small stories. The effect of speed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  62
    The Iconic Logic of Peirce's Graphs.Sun-Joo Shin - 2002 - MIT Press.
    A case study of multimodal systems and a new interpretation of Charles S. Peirce's theory of reasoning and signs based on an analysis of his system of ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  12.  19
    Iconic Plurality.Philippe Schlenker & Jonathan Lamberton - 2019 - Linguistics and Philosophy 42 (1):45-108.
    ASL can express plurals by repeating a noun, in an unpunctuated fashion, in different parts of signing space. We argue that this construction may come with a rich iconic component: the geometric arrangement of the repetitions provides information about the arrangement of the denoted plurality; in addition, the number and speed of the repetitions provide information about the size of the denoted plurality. Interestingly, the shape of the repetitions may introduce a new singular discourse referent when a vertex can be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. Beyond the Icon: Core Cognition and the Bounds of Perception.Sam Clarke - forthcoming - Mind and Language:1-20.
    This paper refines a controversial proposal: that core systems belong to a perceptual kind, marked out by the format of its representational outputs. Following Susan Carey, this proposal has been understood in terms of core representations having an iconic format, like certain paradigmatically perceptual outputs. I argue that they don’t, but suggest that the proposal may be better formulated in terms of a broader analogue format type. Formulated in this way, the proposal accommodates the existence of genuine icons in perception, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  14.  20
    Iconicity and Abduction.Rocco Gangle & Gianluca Caterina - 2016 - New York, USA: Springer.
    This book consolidates and extends the authors’ work on the connection between iconicity and abductive inference. It emphasizes a pragmatic, experimental and fallibilist view of knowledge without sacrificing formal rigor. Within this context, the book focuses particularly on scientific knowledge and its prevalent use of mathematics. To find an answer to the question “What kind of experimental activity is the scientific employment of mathematics?” the book addresses the problems involved in formalizing abductive cognition. For this, it implements the concept and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Iconic Semiosis and Representational Efficiency in the London Underground Diagram.Pedro Atã, Breno Bitarello & Joao Queiroz - 2014 - Cognitive Semiotics 7:177-190.
    The icon is the type of sign connected to efficient representational features, and its manipulation reveals more information about its object. The London Underground Diagram (LUD) is an iconic artifact and a well-known example of representational efficiency, having been copied by urban transportation systems worldwide. This paper investigates the efficiency of the LUD in the light of different conceptions of iconicity. We stress that a specialized representation is an icon of the formal structure of the problem for which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. The Iconic Logic of Peirce's Graphs.Jesse Norman - 2004 - Mind 113 (452):783-787.
  17.  41
    Iconicity.Nicolas Fay, Mark Ellison & Simon Garrod - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2):244-263.
    This paper explores the role of iconicity in spoken language and other human communication systems. First, we concentrate on graphical and gestural communication and show how semantically motivated iconic signs play an important role in creating such communication systems from scratch. We then consider how iconic signs tend to become simplified and symbolic as the communication system matures and argue that this process is driven by repeated interactive use of the signs. We then consider evidence for iconicity at the level (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  18.  37
    Iconicity: From Sign to System in Human Communication and Language.Nicolas Fay, Mark Ellison & Simon Garrod - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2):244-263.
    This paper explores the role of iconicity in spoken language and other human communication systems. First, we concentrate on graphical and gestural communication and show how semantically motivated iconic signs play an important role in creating such communication systems from scratch. We then consider how iconic signs tend to become simplified and symbolic as the communication system matures and argue that this process is driven by repeated interactive use of the signs. We then consider evidence for iconicity at the level (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  19. Iconic Memory and Attention in the Overflow Debate.Tony Cheng - 2017 - Cogent Psychology 4 (1):01-11.
    The overflow debate concerns this following question: does conscious iconic memory have a higher capacity than attention does? In recent years, Ned Block has been invoking empirical works to support the positive answer to this question. The view is called the “rich view” or the “Overflow view”. One central thread of this discussion concerns the nature of iconic memory: for example how rich they are and whether they are conscious. The first section discusses a potential misunderstanding of “visible persistence” in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  11
    Iconic Memory.Barbara Sakitt - 1976 - Psychological Review 83 (4):257-276.
  21. Perception and Iconic Memory: What Sperling Doesn't Show.Ian B. Phillips - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (4):381-411.
    Philosophers have lately seized upon Sperling's partial report technique and subsequent work on iconic memory in support of controversial claims about perceptual experience, in particular that phenomenology overflows cognitive access. Drawing on mounting evidence concerning postdictive perception, I offer an interpretation of Sperling's data in terms of cue-sensitive experience which fails to support any such claims. Arguments for overflow based on change-detection paradigms (e.g. Landman et al., 2003; Sligte et al., 2008) cannot be blocked in this way. However, such paradigms (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  22.  52
    Iconic Consciousness: The Material Feeling of Meaning.Jeffrey C. Alexander - 2010 - Thesis Eleven 103 (1):10-25.
    This article suggests an iconic turn in cultural sociology. Icons can be seen, it is argued, as symbolic condensations that root social meanings in material form, allowing the abstractions of cognition and morality to be subsumed, to be made invisible, by aesthetic shape. Meaning is made iconically visible, in other words, by the beautiful, sublime, ugly, or simply by the mundane materiality of everyday life. But it is via the senses that iconic power is made. This new approach to meaning (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  23. Icon, Index, and Symbol.Arthur W. Burks - 1948 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 9 (4):673-689.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  24.  14
    From Iconic Handshapes to Grammatical Contrasts: Longitudinal Evidence From a Child Homesigner.Marie Coppola & Diane Brentari - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Many sign languages display crosslinguistic consistencies in the use of two iconic aspects of handshape, handshape type and finger group complexity. Handshape type is used systematically in form-meaning pairings (morphology): Handling handshapes (Handling-HSs), representing how objects are handled, tend to be used to express events with an agent (“hand-as-hand” iconicity), and Object handshapes (Object-HSs), representing an object's size/shape, are used more often to express events without an agent (“hand-as-object” iconicity). Second, in the distribution of meaningless properties of form (morphophonology), Object-HSs (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  11
    The Iconicity of Thought and its Moving Pictures: Following the Sinuosities of Peirce's Path.Benoit Gaultier - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (3):374.
    When one tries to determine what the iconic dimension of thought consists in for Peirce and what its range is, one might have the impression that his remarks on this matter are inconsistent. For instance, on the one hand he writes the following: Remember it is by icons only that we really reason, and abstract statements are valueless in reasoning except so far as they aid us to construct diagrams. The sectaries of the opinion I am combating seem, on the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  9
    Visual Iconicity Across Sign Languages: Large-Scale Automated Video Analysis of Iconic Articulators and Locations.Robert Östling, Carl Börstell & Servane Courtaux - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  15
    Iconic Memory: Problems of Definition, Assessment, and Functional Role.Pardo Mustillo - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):189-190.
  28.  37
    Iconic Gestures Prime Words.De-Fu Yap, Wing-Chee So, Ju-Min Melvin Yap, Ying-Quan Tan & Ruo-Li Serene Teoh - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (1):171-183.
    Using a cross-modal semantic priming paradigm, both experiments of the present study investigated the link between the mental representations of iconic gestures and words. Two groups of the participants performed a primed lexical decision task where they had to discriminate between visually presented words and nonwords (e.g., flirp). Word targets (e.g., bird) were preceded by video clips depicting either semantically related (e.g., pair of hands flapping) or semantically unrelated (e.g., drawing a square with both hands) gestures. The duration of gestures (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  47
    From Symbols to Icons: The Return of Resemblance in the Cognitive Neuroscience Revolution.Daniel Williams & Lincoln Colling - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):1941-1967.
    We argue that one important aspect of the “cognitive neuroscience revolution” identified by Boone and Piccinini :1509–1534. doi: 10.1007/s11229-015-0783-4, 2015) is a dramatic shift away from thinking of cognitive representations as arbitrary symbols towards thinking of them as icons that replicate structural characteristics of their targets. We argue that this shift has been driven both “from below” and “from above”—that is, from a greater appreciation of what mechanistic explanation of information-processing systems involves, and from a greater appreciation of the problems (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  30.  16
    Competing Iconicities in the Structure of Languages.Irit Meir, Carol Padden, Mark Aronoff & Wendy Sandler - 2013 - Cognitive Linguistics 24 (2).
  31.  20
    Iconic Representations and Representative Practices.Chiara Ambrosio - 2014 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 28 (3):255-275.
    I develop an account of scientific representations building on Charles S. Peirce's rich, and still underexplored, notion of iconicity. Iconic representations occupy a central place in Peirce's philosophy, in his innovative approach to logic and in his practice as a scientist. Starting from a discussion of Peirce's approach to diagrams, I claim that Peirce's own representations are in line with his formulation of iconicity, and that they are more broadly connected to the pragmatist philosophy he developed in parallel with his (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32.  27
    The Interactive Origin of Iconicity.Mónica Tamariz, Seán G. Roberts, J. Isidro Martínez & Julio Santiago - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):334-349.
    We investigate the emergence of iconicity, specifically a bouba-kiki effect in miniature artificial languages under different functional constraints: when the languages are reproduced and when they are used communicatively. We ran transmission chains of participant dyads who played an interactive communicative game and individual participants who played a matched learning game. An analysis of the languages over six generations in an iterated learning experiment revealed that in the Communication condition, but not in the Reproduction condition, words for spiky shapes tend (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  26
    Iconic Experience in Art and Life.Jeffrey C. Alexander - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (5):1-19.
    This article examines a key question emerging from the strong program in cultural sociology — can art provide a window into social life? An examination of Giacometti's Standing Woman shows that art attempts to express cultural structures via immersion into and through the material surfaces of aesthetic form. Through an analysis of the iconic significance of family photos, furniture and celebrities, the article goes on to suggest that such iconic experience remains at the basis of contemporary social life. It explains (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34.  19
    No Iconic Memory Without Attention.Arien Mack, Muge Erol, Jason Clarke & John Bert - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 40:1-8.
  35.  25
    Diagrams, Iconicity, and Abductive Discovery.Sami Paavola - 2011 - Semiotica 2011 (186):297-314.
    In this article, the role of abductive reasoning within Peirce's diagrammatic reasoning is discussed. Both abduction and diagrammatic reasoning bring in elements of discovery but it is not clear if abduction should be a part of a fully developed diagrammatic system or not for Peirce. This relates to Peirce's way of interpreting abduction in his later writings. Iconicity and perceptual elements as a basis for discoveries are analyzed, both in deductive and abductive reasoning. At the end, the role of modern (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  21
    Iconic Memory is Not a Case of Attention-Free Awareness.Arien Mack, Muge Erol & Jason Clarke - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:291-299.
  37.  48
    Quotation, Demonstration, and Iconicity.Kathryn Davidson - 2015 - Linguistics and Philosophy 38 (6):477-520.
    Sometimes form-meaning mappings in language are not arbitrary, but iconic: they depict what they represent. Incorporating iconic elements of language into a compositional semantics faces a number of challenges in formal frameworks as evidenced by the lengthy literature in linguistics and philosophy on quotation/direct speech, which iconically portrays the words of another in the form that they were used. This paper compares the well-studied type of iconicity found with verbs of quotation with another form of iconicity common in sign languages: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  38.  61
    Compositionality, Iconicity, and Perceptual Nonconceptualism.Josefa Toribio - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):177-193.
    This paper concerns the role of the structural properties of representations in determining the nature of their content. I take as a starting point Fodor's (2007) and Heck's (2007) recent arguments making the iconic structure of perceptual representations essential in establishing their content as content of a different (nonconceptual) kind. I argue that the prima facie state?content error this strategy seems to display is nothing but a case of ?state?content error error,? i.e., the mistake of considering that the properties that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  37
    Do Iconic Hand Gestures Really Contribute Anything to the Semantic Information Conveyed by Speech? An Experimental Investigation.Geoffrey Beattie & Heather Shovelton - 1999 - Semiotica 123 (1-2):1-30.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  40.  48
    Iconic Turn: A Plea for Three Turns of the Screw.Emmanuel Alloa - 2015 - Culture, Theory, and Critique 56 (3).
    In the early 1990s, W.J.T. Mitchell and Gottfried Boehm independently proclaimed that the humanities were witnessing a ‘pictorial’ or ‘iconic turn’. Twenty years later, we may wonder whether this announcement was describing an event that had already taken place or whether it was rather calling forth for it to happen. The contemporary world is, more than ever, determined by visual artefacts. Still, our conceptual arsenal, forged during centuries of logocentrism, still falls behind the complexity of pictorial meaning. The essay has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  13
    Icons, Interrogations, and Graphs: On Peirce's Integrated Notion of Abduction.Francesco Bellucci & Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen - 2020 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 56 (1):43.
    The Syllabus for Certain Topics of Logic is a long treatise that Peirce wrote in October and November to complement the material of his 1903 Lowell Lectures. The last of the eight lectures was on abduction, first entitled “How to Theorize” and then “Abduction.” Of abduction, the Syllabus states that its “conclusion is drawn in the interrogative mood ”.1 This is not the first time that Peirce associates abduction to interrogations,2 but the statement is significant because it is the first (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Visual Reference and Iconic Content.Santiago Echeverri - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (4):761-781.
    Evidence from cognitive science supports the claim that humans and other animals see the world as divided into objects. Although this claim is widely accepted, it remains unclear whether the mechanisms of visual reference have representational content or are directly instantiated in the functional architecture. I put forward a version of the former approach that construes object files as icons for objects. This view is consistent with the evidence that motivates the architectural account, can respond to the key arguments against (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43.  7
    Corrigendum: Iconicity in the Lab: A Review of Behavioral, Developmental, and Neuroimaging Research Into Sound-Symbolism. [REVIEW]Gwilym Lockwood & Mark Dingemanse - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  44.  10
    Iconicity in Signed and Spoken Vocabulary: A Comparison Between American Sign Language, British Sign Language, English, and Spanish.Marcus Perlman, Hannah Little, Bill Thompson & Robin L. Thompson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  13
    Iconicity Affects Children’s Comprehension of Complex Sentences: The Role of Semantics, Clause Order, Input and Individual Differences.Laura E. de Ruiter, Anna L. Theakston, Silke Brandt & Elena V. M. Lieven - 2018 - Cognition 171:202-224.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  27
    Iconic Gestures Prime Words.De-Fu Yap, Wing-Chee So, Ju-Min Melvin Yap, Ying-Quan Tan & Ruo-Li Serene Teoh - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (1):171-183.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47.  23
    Image, Icon, Economy: The Byzantine Origins of the Contemporary Imaginary.Marie-José Mondzain - 2004 - Stanford University Press.
    This book argues that the extraordinary force of the image in contemporary life--the contemporary imaginary--can be traced back to the Byzantine iconoclastic controversy of the eighth and ninth centuries.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  48.  62
    Iconic and Non-Iconic Stages in Number Development: The Role of Language.Heike Wiese - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):385-390.
  49.  14
    Which Words Are Most Iconic?Bodo Winter, Marcus Perlman, Lynn K. Perry & Gary Lupyan - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (3):443-464.
    Some spoken words are iconic, exhibiting a resemblance between form and meaning. We used native speaker ratings to assess the iconicity of 3001 English words, analyzing their iconicity in relation to part-of-speech differences and differences between the sensory domain they relate to. First, we replicated previous findings showing that onomatopoeia and interjections were highest in iconicity, followed by verbs and adjectives, and then nouns and grammatical words. We further show that words with meanings related to the senses are more iconic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50.  22
    Iconic Gestures, Imagery, and Word Retrieval in Speech.Uri Hadar & Brian Butterworth - 1997 - Semiotica 115 (1-2):147-172.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000