Results for 'Identification'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  45
    Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification in Dichotic Listening, Parafoveal Vision, and Visual Masking: A Survey and Appraisal.Daniel Holender - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):1-23.
    When the stored representation of the meaning of a stimulus is accessed through the processing of a sensory input it is maintained in an activated state for a certain amount of time that allows for further processing. This semantic activation is generally accompanied by conscious identification, which can be demonstrated by the ability of a person to perform discriminations on the basis of the meaning of the stimulus. The idea that a sensory input can give rise to semantic activation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   328 citations  
  2.  53
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee—Company Identification.Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557 - 569.
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors (i. e., CSR associations and CSR participation) to understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) relates to employees' identification with their firm.The results reveal that a firm's CSR initiatives increase employee-company identification (E-C identification).E-C identification, in turn, influences employees' commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees' identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige (PEP). Compared to CSR (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   26 citations  
  3.  27
    Does Moral Leadership Enhance Employee Creativity? Employee Identification with Leader and Leader–Member Exchange in the Chinese Context.Qinxuan Gu, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Wan Jiang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):513-529.
    In this article, drawing from a relational perspective, we explore the relationship between moral leadership and employee creativity, treat employee identification with leader and leader–member exchange as two mediators, and develop a new theoretical model of employee creativity. Our data collected from 160 supervisor–subordinate dyads in the People’s Republic of China demonstrate that moral leadership is positively related to both employee identification with leader and LMX. Further, employee identification with leader partially mediates the relationship between moral leadership (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4.  21
    Do Environmental CSR Initiatives Serve Organizations' Legitimacy in the Oil Industry? Exploring Employees' Reactions Through Organizational Identification Theory.Kenneth De Roeck & Nathalie Delobbe - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):397-412.
    Little is known about employees’ responses to their organizations’ initiatives in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Academics have already identified a few outcomes regarding CSR’s impact on employees’ attitudes and behaviours; however, studies explaining the underlying mechanisms that drive employees’ favourable responses to CSR remain largely unexplored. Based on organizational identification (OI) theory, this study surveyed 155 employees of a petrochemical organization to better elucidate why, how and under which circumstances employees might positively respond to organizations’ CSR initiatives in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  5.  11
    Do Environmental CSR Initiatives Serve Organizations' Legitimacy in the Oil Industry? Exploring Employees' Reactions Through Organizational Identification Theory.Kenneth Roeck & Nathalie Delobbe - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):397-412.
    Little is known about employees' responses to their organizations' initiatives in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Academics have already identified a few outcomes regarding CSR's impact on employees' attitudes and behaviours; however, studies explaining the underlying mechanisms that drive employees' favourable responses to CSR remain largely unexplored. Based on organizational identification (OI) theory, this study surveyed 155 employees of a petrochemical organization to better elucidate why, how and under which circumstances employees might positively respond to organizations' CSR initiatives in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  6. Caring, Identification, and Agency.David W. Shoemaker - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1):88-118.
    This paper articulates and defends a noncognitive, care-based view of identification, of what privileged psychic subset provides the source of self-determination in actions and attitudes. The author provides an extended analysis of "caring," and then applies it to debates between Frankfurtians, on the one hand, and Watsonians, on the other, about the nature of identification, then defends the view against objections.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  7.  65
    Stakeholder Theory and Social Identity: Rethinking Stakeholder Identification[REVIEW]Andrew Crane & Trish Ruebottom - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):77-87.
    In this article, we propose an adaption to stakeholder theory whereby stakeholders are conceptualized on the basis of their social identity. We begin by offering a critical review of both traditional and more recent developments in stakeholder theory, focusing in particular on the way in which stakeholder categories are identified. By identifying critical weaknesses in the existing approach, as well as important points of strength, we outline an alternative approach that refines our understanding of stakeholders in important ways. To do (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  8.  14
    CSR and Service Brand: The Mediating Effect of Brand Identification and Moderating Effect of Service Quality. [REVIEW]Hongwei He & Yan Li - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):673 - 688.
    This article examines the mediation effect of brand identification and the moderating effect of service quality (SQ) on the effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) association on service brand performance. A survey of customers of mobile telecommunications services was conducted. The study finds, first, that both CSR and SQ have direct effects on brand identification and customer satisfaction and indirect effects on customer satisfaction (via brand identification) and on service brand loyalty (via customer satisfaction and via "brand (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  9.  18
    Cares, Identification, and Agency Reductionism.Christopher Evan Franklin - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (S1):577-598.
    Reductionists about agency maintain that an agent’s causing something is reducible to states and events involving the agent causing something. Some worry that reductionism cannot accommodate robust forms of agency, such as self-determination. One reductionist answer to this worry, which I call ‘identification reductionism,’ contends that self-governing agents are identified with certain attitudes, and so these attitudes’ causing a decision count as the agent’s self-determining the decision. I argue that a prominent species of identification reductionism developed by Harry (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  37
    The Role of Self-Definitional Principles in Consumer Identification with a Socially Responsible Company.Rafael Currás-Pérez, Enrique Bigné-Alcañiz & Alejandro Alvarado-Herrera - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):547-564.
    This research analyses the influence of the perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR image) on consumer–company identification (C–C identification). This analysis involves an examination of the influence of CSR image on brand identity characteristics which provide consumers with an instrument to satisfy their self-definitional needs, thereby perceiving the brand as more attractive. Also, the direct and mediated influences (through their effect on brand attitude), of CSR-based C–C identification on purchase intention are analysed. The results offer empirical evidence (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  11. Identification and Responsibility.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2003 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):349-376.
    Real-self accounts of moral responsibility distinguish between various types of motivational elements. They claim that an agent is responsible for acts suitably related to elements that constitute the agent's real self. While such accounts have certain advantages from a compatibilist perspective, they are problematic in various ways. First, in it, authority and authenticity conceptions of the real self are often inadequately distinguished. Both of these conceptions inform discourse on identification, but only the former is relevant to moral responsibility. Second, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  12.  16
    Agent Tracking: A Psycho-Historical Theory of the Identification of Living and Social Agents.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (3):359-382.
    To explain agent-identification behaviours, universalist theories in the biological and cognitive sciences have posited mental mechanisms thought to be universal to all humans, such as agent detection and face recognition mechanisms. These universalist theories have paid little attention to how particular sociocultural or historical contexts interact with the psychobiological processes of agent-identification. In contrast to universalist theories, contextualist theories appeal to particular historical and sociocultural contexts for explaining agent-identification. Contextualist theories tend to adopt idiographic methods aimed at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  18
    Bratman on Identity Over Time and Identification at a Time.Christopher Evan Franklin - 2017 - Philosophical Explorations 20 (1):1-14.
    According to reductionists about agency, an agent’s bringing something about is reducible to states and events involving the agent bringing something about. Many have worried that reductionism cannot accommodate robust forms of agency, such as self-determination. One common reductionist answer to this worry contends that self-determining agents are identified with certain states and events, and so these states and events causing a decision counts as the agent’s self-determining the decision. In this paper, I discuss Michael Bratman’s well-known identification reductionist (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  35
    Identification-Free at Last. Semantic Relativism, Evans’s Legacy and a Unified Approach to Immunity to Error Through Misidentification.Marie Guillot - 2014 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (3):07-30.
    One broadly recognised characteristic feature of (a core subset of) the self-attributions constitutive of self-knowledge is that they are ‘immune to error through misidentification’ (hereafter IEM). In the last thirty years, Evans’s notion of “identification-freedom” (Evans 1982) has been central to most classical approaches to IEM. In the Evansian picture, it is not clear, however, whether there is room for a description of what may be the strongest and most interesting variant of IEM; namely what Pryor (1999) has first (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  8
    Standing by Your Organization: The Impact of Organizational Identification and Abusive Supervision on Followers' Perceived Cohesion and Tendency to Gossip.Stijn Decoster, Jeroen Camps, Jeroen Stouten, Lore Vandevyvere & Thomas M. Tripp - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):623-634.
    Abusive supervision has been shown to have significant negative consequences for employees’ well-being, attitudes, and behavior. However, despite the devastating impact, it might well be that employees do not always react negatively toward a leader’s abusive behavior. In the present study, we show that employees’ organizational identification and abusive supervision interact for employees’ perceived cohesion with their work group and their tendency to gossip about their leader. Employees confronted with a highly abusive supervisor had a stronger perceived cohesion and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  33
    An Ethical Exploration of Privacy and Radio Frequency Identification.Alan R. Peslak - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):327-345.
    This manuscript reviews the background of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) as well as the ethical foundations of individual privacy. This includes a historical perspective on personal privacy, a review of the United States Constitutional privacy interpretations, the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, European Union Regulations, as well as the positions of industry and advocacy groups. A brief review of the information technology ethics literature is also included. The RFID privacy concerns are three-fold: pre-sales activities, sales transaction activities, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  17.  32
    Explaining Person Identification: An Inquiry Into the Tracking of Human Agents.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):567-584.
    To introduce the issue of the tracking and identification of human agents, I examine the ability of an agent to track a human person and distinguish this target from other individuals: The ability to perform person identification. First, I discuss influential mechanistic models of the perceptual recognition of human faces and people. Such models propose detailed hypotheses about the parts and activities of the mental mechanisms that control the perceptual recognition of persons. However, models based on perceptual recognition (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. ``A Piece of Yourself'': Ethical Issues in Biometric Identification[REVIEW]Anton Alterman - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (3):139-150.
    The proliferation of biometric identification technology raises difficult issues in the matter of security, privacy and identity. Though biometric "images" are not images per se, they are both unique representations of an individual in themsevles and a means of access to other identifying information. I compare biometric imaging with other kinds of identifying representations and find that there are issues specific to biometric ID's. Because they represent information that is written into the body they are directly related to one's (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  19.  7
    Two Independent Value Orientations: Ideal and Counter-Ideal Leader Values and Their Impact on Followers' Respect for and Identification with Their Leaders. [REVIEW]M. Graf Matthias, van Quaquebeke Niels & van Dick Rolf - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):185-195.
    Traditionally, conceptualizations of human values are based on the assumption that individuals possess a single integrated value system comprising those values that people are attracted by and strive for. Recently, however, van Quaquebeke et al. (in J Bus Ethics 93:293–305, 2010 ) proposed that a value system might consist of two largely independent value orientations—an orientation of ideal values and an orientation of counter-ideal values (values that individuals are repelled by), and that both orientations exhibit antithetic effects on people’s responses (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  20.  21
    Transformational Leaders’ In-Group Versus Out-Group Orientation: Testing the Link Between Leaders’ Organizational Identification, Their Willingness to Engage in Unethical Pro-Organizational Behavior, and Follower-Perceived Transformational Leadership.David Effelsberg & Marc Solga - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):581-590.
    To further the debate on the ethical dimension of transformational leadership from a virtue ethics perspective, this study focused on leaders’ in-group orientation as well as their in-group versus out-group orientation in situations of conflict between organizational interests and broader ethical values. More precisely, the current study captured leaders’ organizational identification as well as their willingness to engage in unethical pro-organizational behavior and tested the relations between these attitudes and follower-perceived TFL behavior. In total, the leadership behaviors of 112 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  8
    The Relationship Between Leaders' Group-Oriented Values and Follower Identification with and Endorsement of Leaders: The Moderating Role of Leaders' Group Membership.Matthias M. Graf, Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Van Quaquebeke & Rolf van Dick - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):301-311.
    In this article, we hypothesize that leaders who display group-oriented values (i.e., values that focus on the welfare of the group rather than on the self-interest of the leader) will be evaluated more positively by their followers than leaders who do not display group-oriented values. Importantly, we expected these effects to be more pronounced for leaders who are ingroup members (i.e., stemming from the same social group as their followers) than for leaders who are outgroup members (i.e., leaders stemming from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  69
    Identification Ethics and Spirituality.Rem B. Edwards - 2016 - Journal of Formal Axiology: Theory and Practice 9:1-17.
    This article explores a form of ethics and spirituality based on the nearly universal but often undeveloped human capacity for identifying self with others and with non-personal values. It begins with commonplace non-moral identification experiences, then describes identification with others in ethical and spiritual unions. Freud’s psychological emphasis on identification is linked with ethics and spirituality, though Freud would have objected. Robert S. Hartman’s three kinds of goodness—systemic, extrinsic, and intrinsic—are applied to abundant ethical and spiritual living (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  36
    The Hidden Politics of Cultural Identification.Amelie Oksenberg Rorty - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (1):152-166.
    While cultural identification --cultural essentialism and reification-- can play an important liberating role. it is also internally oppressive; it denies the dynamics of intra cultural divisions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  24. Identification in Games: Changing Places.Darrell Patrick Rowbottom - 2012 - Erkenntnis 77 (2):197-206.
    This paper offers a novel ‘changing places’ account of identification in games, where the consequences of role swapping are crucial. First, it illustrates how such an account is consistent with the view, in classical game theory, that only outcomes (and not pathways) are significant. Second, it argues that this account is superior to the ‘pooled resources’ alternative when it comes to dealing with some situations in which many players identify. Third, it shows how such a ‘changing places’ account can (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  24
    Ethical Considerations and Proposed Guidelines for the Use of Radio Frequency Identification: Especially Concerning its Use for Promoting Public Safety and National Security. [REVIEW]Vladimir Labay & Amber McKee Anderson - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):265-272.
    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is quickly growing in its applications. A variety of uses for the technology are beginning to be developed, including chips which can be used in identification cards, in individual items, and for human applications, allowing a chip to be embedded under the skin. Such chips could provide numerous benefits ranging from day-to-day convenience to the increased ability of the federal government to adequately ensure the safety of its citizens. However, there are also valid concerns (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  13
    Racial Differences in Helping Behaviors: The Role of Respect, Safety, and Identification[REVIEW]Barjinder Singh & Doan E. Winkel - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):467-477.
    Building upon social and racial identity theories, this study examines the role of positive relational climate in predicting interpersonal helping behaviors (IHBs) at the workplace. Within this context, we examine both the role of mutual respect and psychological safety as exemplars of positive relational climate, and the mediating role of organizational identification (OI). The study also recognizes the importance of individual differences by examining racial differences in OI and IHBs. Results support the hypotheses and strengthen claims of social and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  67
    Chips, Tags and Scanners: Ethical Challenges for Radio Frequency Identification[REVIEW]Dara J. Glasser, Kenneth W. Goodman & Norman G. Einspruch - 2007 - Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):101-109.
    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems identify and track objects, animals and, in principle, people. The ability to gather information obtained by tracking consumer goods, government documents, monetary transactions and human beings raises a number of interesting and important privacy issues. Moreover, RFID systems pose an ensemble of other ethical challenges related to appropriate uses and users of such systems. This paper reviews a number of RFID applications with the intention of identifying the technology’s benefits and possible misuses. We offer (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  16
    Identification in the Limit of Categorial Grammars.Makoto Kanazawa - 1996 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 5 (2):115-155.
    It is proved that for any k, the class of classical categorial grammars that assign at most k types to each symbol in the alphabet is learnable, in the Gold (1967) sense of identification in the limit from positive data. The proof crucially relies on the fact that the concept known as finite elasticity in the inductive inference literature is preserved under the inverse image of a finite-valued relation. The learning algorithm presented here incorporates Buszkowski and Penn's (1990) algorithm (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  29.  40
    Biometrics, Identification and Surveillance.David Lyon - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (9):499-508.
    Governing by identity describes the emerging regime of a globalizing, mobile world. Governance depends on identification but identification increasingly depends on biometrics. This 'solution' to difficulties of verification is described and some technical weaknesses are discussed. The role of biometrics in classification systems is also considered and is shown to contain possible prejudice in relation to racialized criteria of identity. Lastly, the culture of biometric identification is shown to be limited to abstract data, artificially separated from the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. Systems of Visual Identification in Neuroscience: Lessons From Epistemic Logic.Jaakko Hintikka & John Symons - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (1):89-104.
    The following analysis shows how developments in epistemic logic can play a nontrivial role in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that the striking correspondence between two modes of identification, as distinguished in the epistemic context, and two cognitive systems distinguished by neuroscientific investigation of the visual system (the "where" and "what" systems) is not coincidental, and that it can play a clarificatory role at the most fundamental levels of neuroscientific theory.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Polish “Entrepreneur” and EU “Undertaking”: Multilingualism and Differences in Legal Identification.Maciej Etel - 2017 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 52 (1):57-71.
    The European Union and its member-states’ involvement in the economic sphere, manifesting itself in establishing the rules of entrepreneurs’ functioning – their responsibilities and entitlements – requires a precise determination of the addressees of these standards. Proper identification of an entrepreneur is a condition of proper legislation, interpretation, application, control and execution of the law. In this context it is surprising that understanding the term entrepreneur in Polish law and in EU law is not the same, and divergences and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  14
    Forgiveness and Identification.Geoffrey Scarre - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-8.
    Philosophical discussion of forgiveness has mainly focused on cases in which victims and offenders are known to each other. But it commonly happens that a victim brings an offender under a definite description but does not know to which individual this applies. I explore some of the conceptual and moral issues raised by the phenomenon of forgiveness in circumstances in which identification is incomplete, tentative or even mistaken. Among the conclusions reached are that correct and precise identification of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  21
    Change and Continuity in the Techniques and Technologies of Identification Over the Second Christian Millennium.Edward Higgs - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):345-354.
    This paper looks at the history of identification in England over the past 1,000 years. It contends that techniques and technologies of identification do not identify a single entity but a number of forms of personality, including the juridical person, the citizen and the deviant. Individuals can be the bearers of more than one of these personalities at the same time, or over the course of their life. These personalities are created by social performances to which people are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  9
    Empowerment or Repression? Opening Up Questions of Identification and Surveillance in Brazil Through a Case of 'Identity Fraud'.David Murakami Wood & Rodrigo Firmino - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):297-317.
    A real but typical case of identity fraud is used to open up the complex web of identification systems in Brazil. It is argued that identification has two poles related to the nature of citizenship—repression and inclusion—and that reactions from citizens to new identification schemes can be attributed to how they view the purpose of the cards in these terms. In Brazil, a sense of inclusion and citizenship based on a fear of anonymity and exclusion predominates leading (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  7
    Analysing Social Values in Identification; A Framework for Research on the Representation and Implementation of Values.Rusten Menard - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (2).
    This article contributes to the concept of social values by presenting analytical tools that explore how social values are classified, re-presented and interpersonally performed in the construction of identities. I approach social values as classificatory systems of acceptability and desirability that are collectively generated. The meanings of social values are embedded in culture and in power imbalanced social relations; they constantly undergo reformulation in identification processes and are also used to define the social order. I suggest that social values (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  6
    Preconditions for Legal Regulation of Personal Identification in Cyberspace.Darius Štitilis, Paulius Pakutinskas, Inga Dauparaitė & Marius Laurinaitis - 2011 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 18 (2):703-724.
    The article analyses legal preconditions for personal identification in physical and electronic space (hereinafter – cyberspace). Analysis of legal governing of identification in physical space is followed by the analysis of the same in cyberspace. Compulsory elements of identification in physical space and compulsory and non-compulsory elements of identification in cyberspace are provided which leads to conclusions about problem aspects concerning personal identification in cyberspace and related legal governing. This scientific article consists of four main (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  9
    The Relationship Between Leaders' Group-Oriented Values and Follower Identification with and Endorsement of Leaders: The Moderating Role of Leaders' Group Membership. [REVIEW]Matthias M. Graf, Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Quaquebeke & Rolf Dick - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):301-311.
    In this article, we hypothesize that leaders who display group-oriented values (i.e., values that focus on the welfare of the group rather than on the self-interest of the leader) will be evaluated more positively by their followers than leaders who do not display group-oriented values. Importantly, we expected these effects to be more pronounced for leaders who are ingroup members (i.e., stemming from the same social group as their followers) than for leaders who are outgroup members (i.e., leaders stemming from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Stakeholder Engagement by South African Businesses: Identification and Prioritization of Stakeholders.J. C. Mwangi, L. J. Vuuren & G. J. Rossouw - 2005 - African Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):39.
    The term "stakeholder engagement" has gained increasing prominence over the last few years. This prominence is fueled by a range of issues such as an increased dissatisfaction with business's focus on stockholder/shareholder interests and the demands for greater transparency from business following major business scandals. A perceived response to this issue in South Africa has been the inclusion of guidelines on stakeholder engagement in the King II Report on Corporate Governance. Despite this growing interest, there has not been clarity on (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  2
    Analysing Social Values in Identification; A Framework for Research on the Representation and Implementation of Values.Rusten Menard - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (2):122-142.
    This article contributes to the concept of social values by presenting analytical tools that explore how social values are classified, re-presented and interpersonally performed in the construction of identities. I approach social values as classificatory systems of acceptability and desirability that are collectively generated. The meanings of social values are embedded in culture and in power imbalanced social relations; they constantly undergo reformulation in identification processes and are also used to define the social order. I suggest that social values (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. A Return to a Politics of Over-Identification?Timothy Bryar - 2018 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 12 (2).
    The politics of Slavoj Zizek has been attracting greater attention in recent times, particularly as a result of some of his recent public commentary key contemporary political issues, such as the Occupy Movement, the election of Donald Trump, and the Greek referendum. Zizek has advocated a range of political strategies in the course of his writings, including ‘over-identification’. However, while the strategy of over-identification appears to have given way to a preference for the Lacanian Act, subtraction and Bartleby (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  52
    Morality and Strategy in Stakeholder Identification.John Kaler - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):91 - 99.
    Definitions of what it is to be a stakeholder are divided into "claimant" definitions requiring some sort of claim on the services of a business, "influencer" definitions requiring only a capacity to influence the workings of the business, and "combinatory" definitions allowing for either or both of these requirements. It is argued that for the purposes of business ethics, stakeholding has to be about improving the moral conduct of businesses by directing them at serving more than just the interests of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   42 citations  
  42. Agency, Simulation and Self-Identification.Marc Jeannerod & Elisabeth Pacherie - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (2):113-146.
    This paper is concerned with the problem of selfidentification in the domain of action. We claim that this problem can arise not just for the self as object, but also for the self as subject in the ascription of agency. We discuss and evaluate some proposals concerning the mechanisms involved in selfidentification and in agencyascription, and their possible impairments in pathological cases. We argue in favor of a simulation hypothesis that claims that actions, whether overt or covert, are centrally simulated (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  43.  66
    Immigration Policy and Identification Across Borders.Matthew Lindauer - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 12 (3):280-303.
    According to the traditional state sovereignty view in the ethics of immigration literature, societies have a great deal of latitude in determining and implementing their immigration policies. This view is typically defended by appealing to the rights of members of societies, for instance to political self-determination. Opponents of the view have often criticized its partiality to members, arguing that nonmembers can also make stringent demands on societies to be admitted and given the same treatment in matters of immigration policy as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  2
    On the Psychophysiological Identification of Covert Nonoral Language Processes.F. J. McGuigan & G. V. Pavek - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (2):237.
  45. Theology, History, and Religious Identification: Hegelian Methods in the Study of Religion.Kevin J. Harrelson - 2013 - Sophia 52 (3):463-482.
    This essay deals with the impact of Hegel's philosophy of religion by examining his positions on religious identity and on the relationship between theology and history. I argue that his criterion for religious identity was socio-historical, and that his philosophical theology was historical rather than normative. These positions help explain some historical peculiarities regarding the effect of his philosophy of religion. Of particular concern is that although Hegel’s own aims were apologetic, his major influence on religious thought was in the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  12
    Procedural Justice and Employee Engagement: Roles of Organizational Identification and Moral Identity Centrality.Hongwei He, Weichun Zhu & Xiaoming Zheng - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (4):681-695.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47. Making the Right Identification in the Turing Test.Saul Traiger - 2000 - Minds and Machines 10 (4):561-572.
    The test Turing proposed for machine intelligence is usually understood to be a test of whether a computer can fool a human into thinking that the computer is a human. This standard interpretation is rejected in favor of a test based on the Imitation Game introduced by Turing at the beginning of "Computing Machinery and Intelligence.".
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  13
    Closing the Safety Loop: Evaluation of the National Patient Safety Agency's Guidance Regarding Wristband Identification of Hospital Inpatients.Nick Sevdalis, Beverley Norris, Chris Ranger & Sue Bothwell - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):311-315.
  49. Representation as Epistemic Identification.John Dilworth - 2006 - Philo 9 (1):12-31.
    In a previous Philo article, it was shown how properties could be ontologically dispensed with via a representational analysis: to be an X is to comprehensively represent all the properties of an X. The current paper extends that representationalist (RT) theory by explaining representation itself in parallel epistemic rather than ontological terms. On this extended RT (ERT) theory, representations of X, as well as the real X, both may be identified as providing information about X, whether partial or comprehensive. But (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  3
    Reversals Prior to Solution in Concept Identification.Gordon Bower & Thomas Trabasso - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (4):409.
1 — 50 / 1000