Results for 'If You���re an Egalitarian'

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  1.  28
    If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? G. A. Cohen Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000, Xii + 233 Pp., $35.00. [REVIEW]Elisabeth Boetzkes - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (2):386-388.
    If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? is a persuasive extension of Cohen's critique of Rawls's egalitarianism, embedded in reflections on the inadequacies of Marxist theory, on the rationality of "nurtured" beliefs, on Cohen's own personal and intellectual journey, and, finally, on the issue named in the title, the responsibility of the wealthy just in an unjust society. It is an uneven, but highly readable, book. Based on Cohen's 1996 Gifford Lectures, the book is divided into a (...)
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  2. If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? [REVIEW]Sean Sayers - 2000 - Radical Philosophy 104.
     
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  3. If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich?G. A. Cohen - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (205):563-565.
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  4.  62
    If You’Re an Egalitarian, You Shouldn’T Be so Rich.Jason Brennan & Christopher Freiman - 2021 - The Journal of Ethics 25 (3):323-337.
    G.A. Cohen famously claims that egalitarians shouldn’t be so rich. If you possess excess income and there is little chance that the state will redistribute it to the poor, you are obligated to donate it yourself. We argue that this conclusion is correct, but that the case against the rich egalitarian is significantly stronger than the one Cohen offers. In particular, the standard arguments against donating one’s excess income face two critical, unrecognized problems. First, we show that these arguments (...)
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  5.  48
    If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? G. A. Cohen. Harvard University Press, 2000, Xi + 233 Pages. [REVIEW]Colin M. Macleod - 2002 - Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):351-385.
  6. If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're so Rich.G. A. Cohen - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):1-26.
    Many people, including many egalitarian political philosophers, professa belief in equality while enjoying high incomes of which they devotevery little to egalitarian purposes. The article critically examinesways of resolving the putative inconsistency in the stance of thesepeople, in particular, that favouring an egalitarian society has noimplications for behaviour in an unequal one; that what''s bad aboutinequality is a social division that philanthropy cannot reduce; thatprivate action cannot ensure that others have good lives; that privateaction can only achieve (...)
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  7. If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're so Rich?John E. Roemer - 2003 - Mind 112 (445):106-112.
  8.  2
    Discussione Su "If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich?" di G.A. Cohen.Ian Carter, Michael Otsuka & Francesco Saverio Trincia - 2001 - Iride 14 (34):609-634.
    Discussion held in April at a Political Studies Association Roundtable in Manchester, England, on G. A. Cohen’s book If You’re an Egalitarian, How Come You’re So Rich?. --- Michael Otsuka's contribution sub-titled: "Il personale e politico? Il confine tra pubblico e private nella sfera della giustizia distributiva" = "Is the personal political? The boundary between the public and the private in the realm of distributive justice.".
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  9.  22
    Discussione Su "If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich?" di G.A. Cohen.Ian Carter, Michael Otsuka & Francesco Saverio Trincia - 2001 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 14 (3):609-634.
    Discussion held in April at a Political Studies Association Roundtable in Manchester, England, on G. A. Cohen’s book If You’re an Egalitarian, How Come You’re So Rich?. --- Michael Otsuka's contribution sub-titled: "Il personale e politico? Il confine tra pubblico e private nella sfera della giustizia distributiva" = "Is the personal political? The boundary between the public and the private in the realm of distributive justice.".
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  10. G.A. Cohen, If You're An Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? [REVIEW]Daniel Weinstock - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20:405-407.
     
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  11. GA Cohen, If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich? Reviewed By.Daniel Weinstock - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (6):405-407.
     
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  12.  18
    Review of G.A. Cohen, If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're so Rich? [REVIEW]Sean Sayers - 2000 - Radical Philosophy 104 (104):39-41.
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  13.  18
    Review of GA Cohen's If You 'Re an Egalitarian, How Come You 'Re So Rich?'. [REVIEW]Alex Callinicos - 2001 - Historical Materialism 9 (1):169-195.
  14. CHARLES David and William Child (Eds): Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays.Cohen Ga, If You’re an Egalitarian, Crocker Robert, Reason Religion, Crockett Clayton, DUPRÉ John & Human Nature - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):325-330.
     
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  15.  25
    If You’Re a Classical Liberal, How Come You’Re Also an Egalitarian? A Theory of Rule Egalitarianism. Åsbjørn Melkevik, 2020 London, Palgrave MacMillan. 306 Pp, £88.49 (Hb), £55.60. [REVIEW]Daniel Halliday - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (4):719-721.
    Journal of Applied Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  16.  59
    If You’Re a Luck Egalitarian, How Come You Read Bedtime Stories to Your Children?Shlomi Segall - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (1):23-40.
  17. If You're Quasi-Explaining, You're Quasi-Losing.Derek Baker - forthcoming - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics 16. Oxford University Press.
    Normative discourse frequently involves explanation. For example, we tell children that hitting is wrong because it hurts people. In a recent paper, Selim Berker argues that to account for this kind of explanation, expressivists need an account of normative grounding. Against this, I argue that expressivists should eschew grounding and stick to a more pragmatic picture of explanation, one that focuses on how we use explanatory speech acts to communicate information. I propose that the standard form of a normative explanation (...)
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  18. If You’Re Smart, We’Ll Make You Smarter: Applying the Reasoning Behind the Development of Honours Programmes to Other Forms of Cognitive Enhancement.Bas Olthof, Anco Peeters, Kimberly Schelle & Pim Haselager - 2013 - In Federica Lucivero & Anton Vedder (eds.), Beyond Therapy v. Enhancement? Multidisciplinary analyses of a heated debate. Pisa University Press. pp. 117-142.
    Students using Ritalin in preparation for their exams is a hotly debated issue, while meditating or drinking coffee before those same exams is deemed uncontroversial. However, taking Ritalin, meditating and drinking coffee or even education in general, can all be considered forms of cognitive enhancement. Although social acceptance might change in the future, it is interesting to examine the current reasons that are used to distinguish cases deemed problematic or unproblematic. Why are some forms of cognitive enhancement considered problematic, while (...)
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  19.  23
    If You’Re a Critical Theorist, How Come You Work for a University?Daniel Loick - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):233-245.
    ABSTRACTHow can we deal with the apparent contradiction between the normative ideals of critical theory and the practice of the current university system? To answer this question, I consult three classical criticisms of the university system: At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the French educator Joseph Jacotot formulated a pedagogical critique of the disciplinary effects of the educational system; at the beginning of the twentieth century, German historian Franz Rosenzweig articulated an ethical critique of the hegemonic educational system’s distance (...)
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  20.  71
    If You 'Re So Smart, Why Are You Under Surveillance? Universities, Neoliberalism, and New Public Management'.Chris Lorenz - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (3):599-629.
    Although universities have undergone changes since the dawn of their existence, the speed of change started to accelerate remarkably in the 1960s. Spectacular growth in the number of students and faculty was immediately followed by administrative reforms aimed at managing this growth and managing the demands of students for democratic reform and societal relevance. Since the 1980s, however, an entirely different wind has been blowing along the academic corridors. The fiscal crisis of the welfare states and the neoliberal course of (...)
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  21.  33
    If You’Re a Rawlsian, How Come You’Re So Close to Utilitarianism and Intuitionism? A Critique of Daniels’s Accountability for Reasonableness.Gabriele Badano - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):1-16.
    Norman Daniels’s theory of ‘accountability for reasonableness’ is an influential conception of fairness in healthcare resource allocation. Although it is widely thought that this theory provides a consistent extension of John Rawls’s general conception of justice, this paper shows that accountability for reasonableness has important points of contact with both utilitarianism and intuitionism, the main targets of Rawls’s argument. My aim is to demonstrate that its overlap with utilitarianism and intuitionism leaves accountability for reasonableness open to damaging critiques. The important (...)
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  22. If You're so Smart Why Are You Ignorant? Epistemic Causal Paradoxes.Adam Morton - 2002 - Analysis 62 (2):110-116.
    I describe epistemic versions of the contrast between causal and conventionally probabilistic decision theory, including an epistemic version of Newcomb's paradox.
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  23.  53
    I'm OK If You're OK: On the Notion of Trusting Communication. [REVIEW]Ronald Fagin & Joseph Y. Halpern - 1988 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 17 (4):329 - 354.
    We consider the issue of what an agent or a processor needs to know in order to know that its messages are true. This may be viewed as a first step to a general theory of cooperative communication in distributed systems. An honest message is one that is known to be true when it is sent (or said). If every message that is sent is honest, then of course every message that is sent is true. Various weaker considerations than honesty (...)
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  24.  14
    Ethical Leadership Perceptions: Does It Matter If You’Re Black or White?Dennis J. Marquardt, Lee Warren Brown & Wendy J. Casper - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (3):599-612.
    Ethical scandals in business are all too common. Due to the increased public awareness of the transgressions of business executives and the potential costs associated with these transgressions, ethical leadership is among the top qualities sought by organizations as they hire and promote managers. This search for ethical leaders intersects with a labor force that is becoming more racially diverse than ever before. In this paper, we propose that the ethical leadership qualities of business leaders may be perceived differently depending (...)
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  25. What You're Rejecting When You're Expecting.Blake Hereth - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
    I defend two collapsing or reductionist arguments against Weak Pro-Natalism (WPN), the view that procreation is generally merely permissible. In particular, I argue that WPN collapses into Strong Pro-Natalism (SPN), the view that procreation is generally obligatory. Because SPN conflicts with the dominant view that procreation is never obligatory, demonstrating that WPN collapses into or entails SPN establishes epistemic parity (at least as concerns reproductive liberty) between WPN and Anti-Natalism (AN), the view that procreation is always impermissible. First, I distinguish (...)
     
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  26. What You're Rejecting When You're Expecting.Blake Hereth - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
    I defend two collapsing or reductionist arguments against Weak Pro-Natalism (WPN), the view that procreation is generally merely permissible. In particular, I argue that WPN collapses into Strong Pro-Natalism (SPN), the view that procreation is generally obligatory. Because SPN conflicts with the dominant view that procreation is never obligatory, demonstrating that WPN collapses into or entails SPN establishes epistemic parity (at least as concerns reproductive liberty) between WPN and Anti-Natalism (AN), the view that procreation is always impermissible. First, I distinguish (...)
     
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  27. What Are the Chances You’Re Right About Everything? An Epistemic Challenge for Modern Partisanship.Hrishikesh Joshi - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (1):36-61.
    The American political landscape exhibits significant polarization. People’s political beliefs cluster around two main camps. However, many of the issues with respect to which these two camps disagree seem to be rationally orthogonal. This feature raises an epistemic challenge for the political partisan. If she is justified in consistently adopting the party line, it must be true that her side is reliable on the issues that are the subject of disagreements. It would then follow that the other side is anti-reliable (...)
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  28.  74
    "You're Just Jealous!": On Envious Blame.Neal Tognazzini - forthcoming - In Sara Protasi (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Envy.
    One common reaction to criticism is to try to deflect it by calling into question the motivations of the person doing the criticizing. For example, if I feel like you are blaming me for something that you yourself are guilty of having done in the past, I might respond with the retort, "Who are you to blame me for this?", where this retort is meant to serve not as an excuse but rather as a challenge to the standing of the (...)
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  29.  85
    Casting the First Stone: Who Can, and Who Can't, Condemn the Terrorists?Ted Honderich - manuscript
    Professor Cohen, 'Jerry' to very many, has been Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory, All Souls College, Oxford. He has been both a worthy successor to Isaiah Berlin in the chair and also his own man. Born into a Jewish family in Montral, Cohen was educated at McGill University and then in Oxford under Berlin and Gilbert Ryle. He taught philosophy vigorously at University College London and became known as the first proponent of analytical Marxism. His resolute book illustrative (...)
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  30. Is the Personal Political? The Boundary Between the Public and the Private in the Realm of Distributive Justice.Michael Otsuka - 2001 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 14 (34):609-634.
    English version of: "Il personale e politico? Il confine fra pubblico e privato nella sfera della giustizia distributiva." --- Italian text published in Carter, Ian, Otsuka, Michael and Trincia, Francesco Saverio Discussione su "If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich?" di G.A. Cohen. Iride, XIV. pp. 609-634. ISSN 1122-7893.
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  31. Seeing What You're Doing.John Gibbons - 2010 - In T. Szabo Gendler & J. Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    We have some kind of privileged access to our own intentional actions. At least typically, if we're doing it on purpose, we know what we're doing. This privilege consists in the fact that the facts in virtue of which you're intentionally acting are not independent of the facts in virtue of which you're in a position to know what you're doing. An explanation of this privilege is an explanation of the relevant sort of nonindependence. In this paper, I try to (...)
     
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  32.  8
    „Ihr Müsst da Hingehen, Wo Es Weh Tut!“ – Formen, Funktionen Und Folgen Moralischer Kommunikation Im Spitzensport/ “If It Doesn’T Hurt, You’Re Not Doing It Right” – Forms, Functions, and Implications of Moral Communication in Elite Sports.Klaus Cachay & Carmen Borggrefe - 2013 - Sport Und Gesellschaft 10 (2):143-173.
    Zusammenfassung Der Beitrag untersucht den Gebrauch von Moral in der Kommunikation zwischen Trainer und Ath­leten im Spitzensport. Dabei wird moralische Kommunikation aus systemtheoretischer Perspektive als soziale Tatsache konstruiert, um im Lichte dieser Konstruktion konkrete Beispiele aus den Sport­arten Handball und Hockey analysieren und im Hinblick auf ihre Funktionen und Folgen reflektie­ren zu können. Die Ergebnisse dieser Analysen münden in Empfehlungen an Trainer, die zu einem sensiblen Umgang mit Moral raten, da insbesondere dem polemogenen Charakter moralischer und moralisierender Kommunikation Rechnung zu (...)
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  33.  68
    "If You Don't Know How to Fix It, Please Stop Breaking It!" The Precautionary Principle and Climate Change.Philippe H. Martin - 1997 - Foundations of Science 2 (2):263-292.
    Taking precautions to prevent harm. Whether principe de précaution, Vorsorgeprinzip, føre-var prinsippet, or försiktighetsprincip, etc., the precautionary principle embodies the idea that public and private interests should act to prevent harm. Furthermore, the precautionary principle suggests that action should be taken to limit, regulate, or prevent potentially dangerous undertakings even in the absence of absolute scientific proof. Such measures also naturally entail taking economic costs into account. With the environmental disasters of the 1980s, the precautionary principle established itself as an (...)
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  34. Smile When You’Re Winning: How to Become a Cambridge Pragmatist.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2017 - In Sheryl Misak Huw Price (ed.), The Practical Turn: Pragmatism in Britain in the Long Twentieth Century. British Academy.
    The aim of this paper is to trace the development of a particular current of thought known under the label ‘pragmatism’ in the last part of the Twentieth century and the beginning of the Twenty-first. I address three questions about this current of thought. First, what is its actual historical development? Second, does it constitute a single, coherent, philosophical outlook? Third, in what form, if any, does it constitute an attractive philosophical outlook. In the course of addressing these questions I (...)
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  35.  14
    Moving Without Being Where You’Re Not; A Non-Bivalent Way.Constantin Antonopoulos - 2004 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 35 (2):235-259.
    The classical response to Zeno's paradoxes goes like this: 'Motion cannot properly be defined within an instant. Only over a period' I show that this objection is exactly what it takes for Zeno to be right. If motion cannot be defined at an instant, even though the object is always moving at that instant, motion cannot be defined at all, for any longer period of time identical in content to that instant. The nonclassical response introduces discontinuity, to evade the paradox (...)
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  36.  81
    Moving Without Being Where You 'Re Not; a Non-Bivalent Way'.Constantin Antonopoulos - 2004 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 35 (2):235 - 259.
    The classical response to Zeno’s paradoxes goes like this: ‘Motion cannot properly be defined within an instant. Only over a period’ (Vlastos.) I show that this ob-jection is exactly what it takes for Zeno to be right. If motion cannot be defined at an instant, even though the object is always moving at that instant, motion cannot be defined at all, for any longer period of time identical in content to that instant. The nonclassical response introduces discontinuity, to evade the (...)
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  37.  45
    How You Know You’re Conscious: Illusionism and Knowledge of Things.Matt Duncan - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-21.
    Most people believe that consciousness is real. But illusionists say it isn’t—they say consciousness is an illusion. One common illusionist strategy for defending their view involves a debunking argument. They explain why people believe that consciousness exists in a way that doesn’t imply that it does exist; and, in so doing, they aim to show that that belief is unjustified. In this paper I argue that we can know consciousness exists even if these debunking arguments are sound. To do this, (...)
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  38.  4
    On Being Certain: Believing You Are Right Even When You're Not.Robert Alan Burton - 2008 - St. Martin's Press.
    You recognize when you know something for certain, right? You "know" the sky is blue, or that the traffic light had turned green, or where you were on the morning of September 11, 2001--you know these things, well, because you just do. In On Being Certain , neurologist Robert Burton challenges the notions of how we think about what we know. He shows that the feeling of certainty we have when we "know" something comes from sources beyond our control and (...)
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  39. If You're a Cosmopolitan, How Come You're so Rich?Bruce Robbins - 2010 - In Hilary Ballon (ed.), The Cosmopolitan Idea. Nyu Abu Dhabi.
  40. If You're Intending to Bomb a Country, You Don't Announce It for Three Years.Noam Chomsky - unknown
    Today, his hour is normally forty minutes long. Sometimes even, only thirty. It's perfectly enough. In his soft, gravelly voice he is able to tell twice as much as most others would about neoliberals, neoconservatives, the European extreme right and world crises centers, and in a from that can be transcribed and translated virtually verbatim. Without pausing a single time for more than a moment or two in search for the right word.
     
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  41.  31
    ‘Even If You're Positive, You Still Have Rights Because You Are a Person’: Human Rights and the Reproductive Choice of Hiv-Positive Persons.Leslie London, Phyllis J. Orner & Landon Myer - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (1):11-22.
    Global debates in approaches to HIV/AIDS control have recently moved away from a uniformly strong human rights-based focus. Public health utilitarianism has become increasingly important in shaping national and international policies. However, potentially contradictory imperatives may require reconciliation of individual reproductive and other human rights with public health objectives. Current reproductive health guidelines remain largely nonprescriptive on the advisability of pregnancy amongst HIV-positive couples, mainly relying on effective counselling to enable autonomous decision-making by clients. Yet, health care provider values and (...)
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  42.  2
    If You’Re Happy and You Know It, Can You Think Flexibly?Hayley Giniunas, Emily Hindman & Desirée Kozlowski - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  43.  10
    If You’Re ‘Still In’ the Paris Climate Agreement, Then Show Us the Money.Georges Alexandre Lenferna - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):52-55.
    In the wake of Trump’s misguided decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement, there has been a groundswell of sub-national US support for climate action. Governors Brown (...
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  44.  5
    “If You're Light You're Alright”: Light Skin Color as Social Capital for Women of Color.Margaret L. Hunter - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (2):175-193.
    This article uses two national survey data sets to analyze the effects of skin color on life outcomes for African American and Mexican American women. Using a historical framework of European colonialism and slavery, this article explains how skin color hierarchies were established and are maintained. The concept of social capital is used to explain how beauty, defined through light skin, works as capital and as a stratifying agent for women on the dimensions of education, income, and spousal status. The (...)
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  45.  10
    If You’Re Not First, You’Re Last: Are the Empirical Premises Correct in the Ethics of Anti-Doping?Werner Pitsch & John Gleaves - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (4):495-506.
    In the ethical discussion of anti-doping, a number of normative arguments rely on empirical premises. The truth of these premises, however, often remains unverified. This article identifies several...
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  46.  91
    You 'Re an Animal, Plain and Simple'.Jimmy Alfonso Licon - 2014 - Think 13 (36):61-70.
    In this essay, I argue that we are merely biological organisms. This view (animalism) explains everyday practices like watching ourselves in the mirror. The claim that we are psychological in nature cannot explain something as trivial as watching ourselves in the mirror. Thus, we should accept animalism.
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  47. Offer: One Billion Dollars for a Conscious Robot; If You're Honest, You Must Decline.Selmer Bringsjord - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):28-43.
    You are offered one billion dollars to 'simply' produce a proof-of-concept robot that has phenomenal consciousness -- in fact, you can receive a deliciously large portion of the money up front, by simply starting a three-year work plan in good faith. Should you take the money and commence? No. I explain why this refusal is in order, now and into the foreseeable future.
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  48. A Libertarian Response to Macleod 2012: “If You’Re a Libertarian, How Come You’Re So Rich?”.J. C. Lester - 2014 - In Explaining Libertarianism: Some Philosophical Arguments. Buckingham, England: The University of Buckingham Press. pp. 95-105.
    This is a response to Macleod 2012's argument that the history of unjust property acquisitions requires rich libertarians to give away everything in excess of equality. At first, problematic questions are raised. How much property is usually inherited or illegitimate? Why should legitimate inheritance be affected? What of the burden of proof and court cases? A counterfactual problem is addressed. Three important cases are considered: great earned wealth; American slavery; land usurpation. All are argued to be problematic for Macleod 2012's (...)
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  49.  11
    You Don’T Bend It Like Beckham If You’Re Female and Reminded of It: Stereotype Threat Among Female Football Players.Hilmar Grabow & Melanie Kühl - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  50. Franz Brentano: An Invitation to Philosophy.Uriah Kriegel - manuscript
    If you’re a professional philosopher, you’ve probably heard of Brentano as the thinker who reintroduced the notion of intentionality into modern philosophy. If you’re not a professional philosopher, you’ve probably never heard of him. But Brentano’s philosophical work expands far beyond the theme of intentionality and constitutes in fact a complete philosophical system, with well worked out and strikingly original theories in every major area of philosophy. The purpose of this article is to provide a panoramic yet digestible overview of (...)
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