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  1.  27
    Movement as Efficient Cause in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):296-326.
    In this article, I present in a systematic way Aristotle’s understanding of movement (kinêsis) as efficient cause in the Generation of Animals. This aspect of movement is not disclosed in the approach to movement as an incomplete activity in contrast to energeia, which has been extensively discussed in the literature. I explain in which sense movement is the efficient cause of generation and how this movement is related to the other factors, in particular the source of movement, the seminal fluid, (...)
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  2.  15
    Seed (Sperma) and Kuêma in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):87-124.
    There are two different notions of seed at work in the Generation of Animals: seed as the spermatic residue, which concerns only the male and the female generative contributions, and seed as the kuêma and first mixture of the two generative contributions. The latter is a notion of seed common to plants and animals. The passage in GA I.18, 724b12–22 where Aristotle distinguishes between these two notions of seed has been mistakenly discredited as inauthentic or simply as irrelevant for understanding (...)
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  3.  20
    External Figure (Schêma) and Homonymy in Aristotle.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (4):389-406.
    According to Aristotle’s homonymy principle, when we use a common name to refer to wholes and parts that lack the capacity to carry out the function signified by the name, we are using the name in a homonymous way. For example, pictures and statues of a man, or a dead eye, are called “man” and “eye” only homonymously because they cannot carry out their proper function, i.e., to live and to see. This principle serves well Aristotle’s purposes in natural philosophy, (...)
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  4. Generation and Homonymy in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
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  5.  25
    Unity and Continuity in Aristotle.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (2):225-246.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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