Results for 'Imitation'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  96
    Imitation and Conventional Communication.Richard Moore - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  2.  82
    Imitating Virtue.Margaret Hampson - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):292-320.
    Moral virtue is, for Aristotle, famously acquired through the practice of virtuous actions. But how should we understand the activity of Aristotle’s moral learner, and how does her activity result in the acquisition of virtue? I argue that by understanding Aristotle’s learner as engaged in the emulative imitation of a virtuous agent, we can best account for her development. Such activity crucially involves the adoption of the virtuous agent’s perspective, from which I argue the learner is positioned so as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  31
    Neonatal Imitation in Context: Sensorimotor Development in the Perinatal Period.Nazim Keven & Kathleen A. Akins - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Over 35 years ago, Meltzoff and Moore (1977) published their famous article ‘Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates’. Their central conclusion, that neonates can imitate, was and continues to be controversial. Here we focus on an often neglected aspect of this debate, namely on neonatal spontaneous behaviors themselves. We present a case study of a paradigmatic orofacial ‘gesture’, namely tongue protrusion and retraction (TP/R). Against the background of new research on mammalian aerodigestive development, we ask: How (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  4. The Imitation Game.Keith Gunderson - 1964 - Mind 73 (April):234-45.
  5.  70
    Imitation Reconsidered.Ellen Fridland & Richard Moore - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):856-880.
    In the past 20 years or so, the psychological research on imitation has flourished. However, our working definition of imitation has not adequately adapted in order to reflect this research. The closest that we've come to a revamped conception of imitation comes from the work of Michael Tomasello. Despite its numerous virtues, Tomasello's definition is in need of at least two significant amendments, if it is to reflect the current state of knowledge. Accordingly, it is our goal (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  6.  36
    Imitation and Innovation: The Dual Engines of Cultural Learning.Cristine H. Legare & Mark Nielsen - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (11):688-699.
  7.  84
    Imitation, Mirror Neurons and Autism.Justin H. G. Williams, Andrew Whiten, Thomas Suddendorf & David I. Perrett - unknown
    Various deficits in the cognitive functioning of people with autism have been documented in recent years but these provide only partial explanations for the condition. We focus instead on an imitative disturbance involving difficulties both in copying actions and in inhibiting more stereotyped mimicking, such as echolalia. A candidate for the neural basis of this disturbance may be found in a recently discovered class of neurons in frontal cortex, 'mirror neurons' (MNs). These neurons show activity in relation both to specific (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  8.  64
    Imitation as an Inheritance System.Nicholas Shea - 2009 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 364:2429-2443.
    What is the evolutionary significance of the various mechanisms of imitation, emulation and social learning found in humans and other animals? This paper presents an advance in the theoretical resources for addressing that question, in the light of which standard approaches from the cultural evolution literature should be refocused. The central question is whether humans have an imitationbased inheritance system—a mechanism that has the evolutionary function of transmitting behavioural phenotypes reliably down the generations. To have the evolutionary power of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  9. Imitation and Gender Insubordination1.J. Butler - forthcoming - Cultural Theory and Popular Culture:255.
  10.  59
    Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning.Philip S. Gerrans - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  43
    Imitation: Is Cognitive Neuroscience Solving the Correspondence Problem?Marcel Brass & Cecilia Heyes - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):489-495.
  12. Imitation and Contemporaneity: Kierkegaard and the Imitation of Christ.Joshua Cockayne - 2022 - Wiley: The Heythrop Journal 63 (4):553-566.
    The Heythrop Journal, Volume 63, Issue 4, Page 553-566, July 2022.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  67
    Mortal Imitations of Divine Life: The Nature of the Soul in Aristotle's De Anima.Eli Diamond - 2015 - Northwestern University Press.
    In Mortal Imitations of Divine Life, Diamond offers an interpretation of De Anima, which explains how and why Aristotle places souls in a hierarchy of value. Aristotle’s central intention in De Anima is to discover the nature and essence of soul—the prin­ciple of living beings. He does so by identifying the common structures underlying every living activity, whether it be eating, perceiving, thinking, or moving through space. As Diamond demonstrates through close readings of De Anima, the nature of the soul (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14. Imitation Et Anthropologie.Isabelle Balsamo (ed.) - 2005 - Maison des Sciences de L'Homme.
    L'imitation est-elle l'apanage de l'espèce humaine? Dans quelle mesure l'imitation, abondamment mentionnée dans le discours colonial, est-elle révélatrice des ambiguïtés de la situation coloniale? Comment rendre intelligible l'adoption délibérée par des individus tant de comportements que de gestes imitatifs? Qu'il s'agisse des rapports entre les colons français et les "indigènes" , de la constitution de Tahiti en paradis touristique , des différences entre hip-hop français et américain , ou encore des liens entre les dimensions biologique, psychologique et culturelle (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  11
    Imitation Game: Threshold or Watershed?Eric Neufeld & Sonje Finnestad - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (4):637-657.
    Showing remarkable insight into the relationship between language and thought, Alan Turing in 1950 proposed the Imitation Game as a proxy for the question “Can machines think?” and its meaning and practicality have been debated hotly ever since. The Imitation Game has come under criticism within the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence communities with leading scientists proposing alternatives, revisions, or even that the Game be abandoned entirely. Yet Turing’s imagined conversational fragments between human and machine are rich with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  63
    Imitation, Skill Learning, and Conceptual Thought: An Embodied, Developmental Approach.Ellen Fridland - 2013 - In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. pp. 203--224.
  17. Imitation, Representation, and Humanity in Spinoza's Ethics.Justin Steinberg - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):383-407.
    In IVP50S, Spinoza claims that “one who is moved to aid others neither by reason nor by pity is rightly called inhuman. For (by IIIP27) he seems to be unlike a man” (IVP50S). At first blush, the claim seems implausible, as it relies on the dubious assumption that beings will necessarily imitate the affects of conspecifics. In the first two sections of this paper, I explain why Spinoza accepts this thesis and show how this claim can be made compatible with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18.  54
    Imitation, Inspiration, and Creation: Cognitive Process of Creative Drawing by Copying Others' Artworks.Takeshi Okada & Kentaro Ishibashi - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1804-1837.
    To investigate the cognitive processes underlying creative inspiration, we tested the extent to which viewing or copying prior examples impacted creative output in art. In Experiment 1, undergraduates made drawings under three conditions: copying an artist's drawing, then producing an original drawing; producing an original drawing without having seen another's work; and copying another artist's work, then reproducing that artist's style independently. We discovered that through copying unfamiliar abstract drawings, participants were able to produce creative drawings qualitatively different from the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  87
    Imitation-Man and the 'New' Epiphenomenalism.Eric Russert Kraemer - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (September):479-487.
    A number of philosophers have recently held that the phenomenal aspect of experience cannot be adequately dealt with within a materialist account of the mind-body relation. A natural response for those who take both this objection and scientific considerations seriously is to adopt either a double-aspect theory of mind or a version of epiphenomenalism. In this paper I will examine such a view recently defended by Keith Campbell. Campbell calls his view a ‘new’ epiphenomenalism. I shall begin by considering Campbell's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Imitation Is the Sincerest Form of Cheating: The Influence of Direct Knowledge and Attitudes on Academic Dishonesty.David A. Rettinger, Kristina Ryan, Kristopher Fulks, Anna Deaton, Jeffrey Barnes & Jillian O'Rourke - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):47-64.
    What effect does witnessing other students cheat have on one's own cheating behavior? What roles do moral attitudes and neutralizing attitudes (justifications for behavior) play when deciding to cheat? The present research proposes a model of academic dishonesty which takes into account each of these variables. Findings from experimental (vignette) and survey methods determined that seeing others cheat increases cheating behavior by causing students to judge the behavior less morally reprehensible, not by making rationalization easier. Witnessing cheating also has unique (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  21.  7
    Neonatal Imitation: Theory, Experimental Design, and Significance for the Field of Social Cognition.Stefano Vincini, Yuna Jhang, Eugene H. Buder & Shaun Gallagher - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  22.  1
    Imitation in Infancy.Jacqueline Nadel & George Butterworth (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1999, this book brings together the extensive modern evidence for innate imitation in babies. Modern research has shown imitation to be a natural mechanism of learning and communication which deserves to be at centre stage in developmental psychology. Yet the very possibility of imitation in newborn humans has had a controversial history. Defining imitation has proved to be far from straightforward and scientific evidence for its existence in neonates is only now becoming accepted, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23.  28
    Imitative Flexibility and the Development of Cultural Learning.Cristine H. Legare, Nicole J. Wen, Patricia A. Herrmann & Harvey Whitehouse - 2015 - Cognition 142:351-361.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  24.  85
    Is Imitation Learning the Route to Humanoid Robots?Stefan Schaal - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):233-242.
  25.  50
    Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach.Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):667-684.
    To explain social learning without invoking the cognitively complex concept of imitation, many learning mechanisms have been proposed. Borrowing an idea used routinely in cognitive psychology, we argue that most of these alternatives can be subsumed under a single process, priming, in which input increases the activation of stored internal representations. Imitation itself has generally been seen as a This has diverted much research towards the all-or-none question of whether an animal can imitate, with disappointingly inconclusive results. In (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  26.  10
    Imitation of Life: Cinema and the Moral Imagination.Jane Stadler - 2020 - Paragraph 43 (3):298-313.
    The influence of film's compelling images, characters and storylines has polarized perspectives on cinema and the moral imagination. Does film stimulate the audience's imagination and foster imitation in morally dangerous ways, or elicit ethical insight and empathy? Might the presentation of images on screen denude the capacity to conjure images in the mind's eye, or cultivate the imaginative capacity for moral vision as spectators attend to the plight of protagonists? Using Imitation of Life to interrogate paradoxical perspectives on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan Hurley - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):165-218.
  28.  33
    Urban Imitations.Christian Borch - 2005 - Theory, Culture and Society 22 (3):81-100.
    Although long forgotten, the sociology of Gabriel Tarde has suddenly re-emerged. This article backs up the renewed interest in Tarde in four ways. First, drawing upon the systems theory of Niklas Luhmann, it demonstrates that the usual critique of Tarde is false: Tarde’s theory of imitation is not trapped in any kind of psychologism but is, indeed, a pure sociology. Against this background, the second part of the article argues that the notion of imitation is closely tied to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  29.  16
    Imitate or Innovate? Children’s Innovation is Influenced by the Efficacy of Observed Behaviour.Kayleigh Carr, Rachel L. Kendal & Emma G. Flynn - 2015 - Cognition 142:322-332.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  16
    Imitation by Social Interaction? Analysis of a Minimal Agent-Based Model of the Correspondence Problem.Tom Froese, Charles Lenay & Takashi Ikegami - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  31.  45
    Imitation Explains the Propagation, Not the Stability of Animal Culture.Dan Sperber - unknown
    For acquired behaviour to count as cultural, two conditions must be met: it must propagate in a social group, and it must remain stable across generations in the process of propagation. It is commonly assumed that imitation is the mechanism that explains both the spread of animal culture and its stability. We review the literature on transmission chain studies in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and other animals, and we use a formal model to argue that imitation, which may well (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32. Imitation and Society: The Persistence of Mimesis in the Aesthetics of Burke, Hogarth, and Kant.Tom Huhn - 2004 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book reconsiders the fate of the doctrine of mimesis in the eighteenth century. Standard accounts of the aesthetic theories of this era hold that the idea of mimesis was supplanted by the far more robust and compelling doctrines of taste and aesthetic judgment. Since the idea of mimesis was taken to apply only in the relation of art to nature, it was judged to be too limited when the focus of aesthetics changed to questions about the constitution of individual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  86
    Imitation Versus Communication: Testing for Human-Like Intelligence.Jamie Cullen - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (2):237-254.
    Turing’s Imitation Game is often viewed as a test for theorised machines that could ‘think’ and/or demonstrate ‘intelligence’. However, contrary to Turing’s apparent intent, it can be shown that Turing’s Test is essentially a test for humans only. Such a test does not provide for theorised artificial intellects with human-like, but not human-exact, intellectual capabilities. As an attempt to bypass this limitation, I explore the notion of shifting the goal posts of the Turing Test, and related tests such as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  41
    Imitating Jesus: An Inclusive Approach to New Testament Ethics.Richard A. Burridge - 2007 - William B. Eerdmans.
    Being 'biblical' : contexts and starting points -- Jesus of Nazareth : great moral teacher or friend of sinners? -- Paul : follower or founder? -- Mark : suffering for the kingdom -- Matthew : being truly righteous -- Luke-Acts : a universal concern -- John : teaching the truth in love -- Apartheid : an ethical and generic challenge to reading the New Testament.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  35.  75
    Imitation’ in Plato's Republic.J. Tate - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):16-23.
    It has become a standing reproach upon Plato's treatment of poetry in the Republic that he forgets or misrepresents in the tenth book what he said in the third. According to the earlier discussion, poetry is required to perform important services in the ideal state; its subject-matter will make the young familiar with true doctrines ; its style will reflect the qualities proper to the character of guardian, and therefore—by the principle of imitation—induce and confirm such qualities in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  34
    Imitation and Contemporaneity: Kierkegaard and the Imitation of Christ.Joshua Cockayne - 2022 - Wiley: The Heythrop Journal 63 (4):553-566.
    The Heythrop Journal, Volume 63, Issue 4, Page 553-566, July 2022.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  32
    Automatic Imitation of Pro- and Antisocial Gestures: Is Implicit Social Behavior Censored?Emiel Cracco, Oliver Genschow, Ina Radkova & Marcel Brass - 2018 - Cognition 170:179-189.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  17
    Intimate Imitation: Automatic Motor Imitation in Romantic Relationships.Lara Maister & Manos Tsakiris - 2016 - Cognition 152:108-113.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  10
    Concurrent Imitative Movement During Action Observation Facilitates Accuracy of Outcome Prediction in Less-Skilled Performers.Satoshi Unenaka, Sachi Ikudome, Shiro Mori & Hiroki Nakamoto - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  27
    Vocal Imitation of Song and Speech.James T. Mantell & Peter Q. Pfordresher - 2013 - Cognition 127 (2):177-202.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41.  13
    Imitation Is Necessary for Cumulative Cultural Evolution in an Unfamiliar, Opaque Task.Helen Wasielewski - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):161-179.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  42.  27
    Vagueness and Imprecise Imitation in Signalling Games.Michael Franke & José Pedro Correia - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (4):1037-1067.
    Signalling games are popular models for studying the evolution of meaning, but typical approaches do not incorporate vagueness as a feature of successful signalling. Complementing recent like-minded models, we describe an aggregate population-level dynamic that describes a process of imitation of successful behaviour under imprecise perception and realization of similar stimuli. Applying this new dynamic to a generalization of Lewis’s signalling games, we show that stochastic imprecision leads to vague, yet by-and-large efficient signal use, and, moreover, that it unifies (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  43. The Diverging Force of Imitation. Integrating Cognitive Science and Hermeneutics.Machiel Keestra - 2008 - Review of General Psychology 12 (2):127-136.
    Recent research on infant and animal imitation and on mirror neuron systems has
    brought imitation back in focus in psychology and cognitive science. This topic has
    always been important for philosophical hermeneutics as well, focusing on theory and
    method of understanding. Unfortunately, relations between the scientific and the
    hermeneutic approaches to imitation and understanding have scarcely been investigated,
    to the loss of both disciplines. In contrast to the cognitive scientific emphasis on
    sharing and convergence of representations, the hermeneutic analysis emphasizes the
    indeterminacy and openness (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  6
    Imitation-Man and the 'New' Epiphenomenalism.Eric Russert Kraemer - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):479-487.
    A number of philosophers have recently held that the phenomenal aspect of experience cannot be adequately dealt with within a materialist account of the mind-body relation. A natural response for those who take both this objection and scientific considerations seriously is to adopt either a double-aspect theory of mind or a version of epiphenomenalism. In this paper I will examine such a view recently defended by Keith Campbell. Campbell calls his view a ‘new’ epiphenomenalism. I shall begin by considering Campbell's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  12
    Imitation, Sign Language Skill and the Developmental Ease of Language Understanding Model.Emil Holmer, Mikael Heimann & Mary Rudner - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  46.  33
    Complex Imitation and the Language-Ready Brain.Michael A. Arbib - forthcoming - Language and Cognition.
  47.  68
    Imitation Makes Us Human.Susan Blackmore - 2007 - In C. A. Pasternak (ed.), What Makes Us Human? pp. 1-16.
    To be human is to imitate. This is a strong claim, and a contentious one. It implies that the turning point in hominid evolution was when our ancestors first began to copy each other’s sounds and actions, and that this new ability was responsible for transforming an ordinary ape into one with a big brain, language, a curious penchant for music and art, and complex cumulative culture. The argument, briefly, is this. All evolutionary processes depend on information being copied with (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Imitating Paul: A Discourse of Power.Elizabeth A. Castelli - 1991
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  49.  43
    Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes?Richard P. Cooper, Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (4):605-630.
    Automatic imitation or “imitative compatibility” is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions—body movement topography and relative spatial position. However, it is not yet clear whether these two types of stimulus–response compatibility effect are mediated by the same or different cognitive processes. We present an interactive activation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  7
    The Imitation of Nature.John Hyman - 1989 - Blackwell.
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;Metaphor and analogy are the scaffolding of science. Kepler's theory of the retinal picture could not have been built without the analogy between an eye and a camera obscura, and, two hundred and fifty years later, Charles Darwin devoted most of the first chapter of The origin of Species to discussion of pigeon fanciers. Unlike Darwin, Kepler was bewitched by his own imagination and was led to wonder "how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000