Results for 'Imitation'

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  1. The Shared Circuits Model. How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation and Mind Reading.Susan L. Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines; it is here surveyed under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring and simulation. It is (...)
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  2.  84
    Imitation and Conventional Communication.Richard Moore - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts (...)
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  3.  38
    Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach.Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):667-684.
    To explain social learning without invoking the cognitively complex concept of imitation, many learning mechanisms have been proposed. Borrowing an idea used routinely in cognitive psychology, we argue that most of these alternatives can be subsumed under a single process, priming, in which input increases the activation of stored internal representations. Imitation itself has generally been seen as a This has diverted much research towards the all-or-none question of whether an animal can imitate, with disappointingly inconclusive results. In (...)
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  4.  62
    The Trouble with Memes: Inference Versus Imitation in Cultural Creation.Scott Atran - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (4):351-381.
    Memes are hypothetical cultural units passed on by imitation; although nonbiological, they undergo Darwinian selection like genes. Cognitive study of multimodular human minds undermines memetics: unlike in genetic replication, high-fidelity transmission of cultural information is the exception, not the rule. Constant, rapid 'mutation' of information during communication generates endlessly varied creations that nevertheless adhere to modular input conditions. The sort of cultural information most susceptible to modular processing is that most readily acquired by children, most easily transmitted across individuals, (...)
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  5. The Diverging Force of Imitation. Integrating Cognitive Science and Hermeneutics.Machiel Keestra - 2008 - Review of General Psychology 12 (2):127-136.
    Recent research on infant and animal imitation and on mirror neuron systems has
    brought imitation back in focus in psychology and cognitive science. This topic has
    always been important for philosophical hermeneutics as well, focusing on theory and
    method of understanding. Unfortunately, relations between the scientific and the
    hermeneutic approaches to imitation and understanding have scarcely been investigated,
    to the loss of both disciplines. In contrast to the cognitive scientific emphasis on
    sharing and convergence of representations, the hermeneutic analysis emphasizes the
    indeterminacy and openness (...)
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  6.  29
    The Virtue of Emerson's Imitation of Christ: From William Ellery Channing to John Brown.Emily J. Dumler-Winckler - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):510-538.
    Christians have traditionally conceived of the moral life as an imitation of Christ, whereby followers enter into fellowship with God. The American Transcendentalists can be understood as extending rather than dispensing with this legacy. For Emerson, a person cultivates virtues by imitating those she loves and admires. Ultimately, however, the virtues enable her to innovate on received models, to excel by pressing beyond exemplars. Emerson's famous line, “imitation is suicide,” is not a contradiction but a fulfillment of the (...)
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  7.  67
    Do Neonates Display Innate Self-Awareness? Why Neonatal Imitation Fails to Provide Sufficient Grounds for Innate Self-and Other-Awareness.Talia Welsh - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):221-238.
    Until the 1970s, models of early infancy tended to depict the young child as internally preoccupied and incapable of processing visual-tactile data from the external world. Meltzoff and Moore's groundbreaking studies of neonatal imitation disprove this characterization of early life: They suggest that the infant is cognizant of its external environment and is able to control its own body. Taking up these experiments, theorists argue that neonatal imitation provides an empirical justification for the existence of an innate ability (...)
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  8.  45
    Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning.Philip S. Gerrans - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the (...)
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  9.  41
    Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes?Richard P. Cooper, Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (4):605-630.
    Automatic imitation or “imitative compatibility” is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions—body movement topography and relative spatial position. However, it is not yet clear whether these two types of stimulus–response compatibility effect are mediated by the same or different cognitive processes. We present an interactive activation (...)
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  10.  17
    The Potential of the Imitation Game Method in Exploring Healthcare Professionals’ Understanding of the Lived Experiences and Practical Challenges of Chronically Ill Patients.Rik Wehrens - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (3):253-271.
    This paper explores the potential and relevance of an innovative sociological research method known as the Imitation Game for research in health care. Whilst this method and its potential have until recently only been explored within sociology, there are many interesting and promising facets that may render this approach fruitful within the health care field, most notably to questions about the experiential knowledge or ‘expertise’ of chronically ill patients. The Imitation Game can be especially useful because it provides (...)
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  11.  32
    The Socratic Dimension of Kierkegaard's Imitation.Wojciech T. Kaftański - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (4):599-611.
    This article reevaluates the origins of Kierkegaard’s concept of imitation. It challenges the general approach to the genealogy of the phenomenon in question, which privileges the influence of various religious traditions on the thinker and ignores his exposure to the non-Christian literature. I contend that a close reading of the Apology, the Sophist, the Republic, and the Phaedo alongside Kierkegaard’s texts from the so-called second authorship reveals in the dialogues of Plato the three crucial aspects of Kierkegaard’s concept of (...)
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  12.  22
    Reconsidering the Role of Manual Imitation in Language Evolution.Antonella Tramacere & Richard Moore - 2018 - Topoi 37 (2):319-328.
    In this paper, we distinguish between a number of different phenomena that have been called imitation, and identify one form—a high fidelity mechanism for social learning—considered to be crucial for the development of language. Subsequently, we consider a common claim in the language evolution literature, which is that prior to the emergence of vocal language our ancestors communicated using a sophisticated gestural protolanguage, the learning of some parts of which required manual imitation. Drawing upon evidence from recent work (...)
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  13. Undecidability in the Imitation Game.Y. Sato & T. Ikegami - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (2):133-43.
    This paper considers undecidability in the imitation game, the so-called Turing Test. In the Turing Test, a human, a machine, and an interrogator are the players of the game. In our model of the Turing Test, the machine and the interrogator are formalized as Turing machines, allowing us to derive several impossibility results concerning the capabilities of the interrogator. The key issue is that the validity of the Turing test is not attributed to the capability of human or machine, (...)
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  14.  14
    How Sensorimotor Interactions Enable Sentence Imitation.Tzu-Wei Hung - 2015 - Minds and Machines 25 (4):321-338.
    Despite intensive debates regarding action imitation and sentence imitation, few studies have examined their relationship. In this paper, we argue that the mechanism of action imitation is necessary and in some cases sufficient to describe sentence imitation. We first develop a framework for action imitation in which key ideas of Hurley’s shared circuits model are integrated with Wolpert et al.’s motor selection mechanism and its extensions. We then explain how this action-based framework clarifies sentence (...) without a language-specific faculty. Finally, we discuss the empirical support for and philosophical significance of this perspective. (shrink)
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  15.  15
    Kierkegaard's Aesthetics and the Aesthetic of Imitation.Wojciech Kaftański - 2014 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1):111-134.
    This paper challenges the general approach to Kierkegaard ’ s engagement with imitation, which privileges a strictly religious reading. Heretofore imitation has been apprehended as a coherent concept shaped within the context of imitatio Christi in the devotio moderna. I locate Kierkegaard ’ s writings in the broader context of mimesis. Analysing particular mimetic structures woven into the text, I show that a plurality of imitative models that are different fromChrist occurs therein. Addressing the distinction between the religious (...)
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  16.  81
    Imitation-Man and the 'New' Epiphenomenalism.Eric Russert Kraemer - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (September):479-487.
    A number of philosophers have recently held that the phenomenal aspect of experience cannot be adequately dealt with within a materialist account of the mind-body relation. A natural response for those who take both this objection and scientific considerations seriously is to adopt either a double-aspect theory of mind or a version of epiphenomenalism. In this paper I will examine such a view recently defended by Keith Campbell. Campbell calls his view a ‘new’ epiphenomenalism. I shall begin by considering Campbell's (...)
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  17.  45
    Imitation Games: Turing, Menard, Van Meegeren. [REVIEW]Brian P. Bloomfield & Theo Vurdubakis - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (1):27-38.
    For many, the very idea of an artificialintelligence has always been ethicallytroublesome. The putative ability of machinesto mimic human intelligence appears to callinto question the stability of taken forgranted boundaries between subject/object,identity/similarity, free will/determinism,reality/simulation, etc. The artificiallyintelligent object thus appears to threaten thehuman subject with displacement and redundancy.This article takes as its starting point AlanTuring''s famous ''imitation game,'' (the socalled ''Turing Test''), here treated as aparable of the encounter between human originaland machine copy – the born and the made. (...)
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  18.  81
    Imitation Versus Communication: Testing for Human-Like Intelligence.Jamie Cullen - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (2):237-254.
    Turing’s Imitation Game is often viewed as a test for theorised machines that could ‘think’ and/or demonstrate ‘intelligence’. However, contrary to Turing’s apparent intent, it can be shown that Turing’s Test is essentially a test for humans only. Such a test does not provide for theorised artificial intellects with human-like, but not human-exact, intellectual capabilities. As an attempt to bypass this limitation, I explore the notion of shifting the goal posts of the Turing Test, and related tests such as (...)
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  19.  19
    Human Mimicry and Imitation: The Case of Biomimetics.Andrea Borsari - 2017 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 10 (1):51-61.
    Defining biomimetics as the imitation of models, systems and elements of nature for the purpose to solve human complex problems, the essay considers some examples of that activity, like display technologies, and nanoscientific innovations. According to the literature on the subject, the further section of the article examines the possibility of giving a conceptual framework for biomimetic processes, starting from the observation of its current insufficient development both on the logical level and on a wider philosophical one. The fourth (...)
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  20.  12
    Children's Representation and Imitation of Events: How Goal Organization Influences 3‐Year‐Old Children's Memory for Action Sequences.Jeff Loucks, Christina Mutschler & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1904-1933.
    Children's imitation of adults plays a prominent role in human cognitive development. However, few studies have investigated how children represent the complex structure of observed actions which underlies their imitation. We integrate theories of action segmentation, memory, and imitation to investigate whether children's event representation is organized according to veridical serial order or a higher level goal structure. Children were randomly assigned to learn novel event sequences either through interactive hands-on experience or via storybook. Results demonstrate that (...)
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  21. The Concept of Imitation in Greek and Indian Aesthetics.Ananta Charana Sukla - 1977 - Rupa.
    The author has made a detailed study, more detailed, he rightly claims, than hitherto attempted, of the concept of mimesis in aesthetic thought and has devoted equal space to Greek and Sanskrit writers... Wilamowitz, the doyen of modern classical scholars, describes mimesis as a 'fatal word' 'rapped out' by Plato. But the present author has demonstrated with great cogency that the word was not 'rapped out' by Plato at all, and that the concept and the word are both as old (...)
     
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  22. Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan L. Hurley - 2006 - In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. pp. 301-337.
    Why does it matter whether and how individuals consciously control their behavior? It matters for many reasons. Here I focus on concerns about social influences of which agents are typically unaware on aggressive behavior.
     
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  23.  45
    Imitation, Inspiration, and Creation: Cognitive Process of Creative Drawing by Copying Others' Artworks.Takeshi Okada & Kentaro Ishibashi - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1804-1837.
    To investigate the cognitive processes underlying creative inspiration, we tested the extent to which viewing or copying prior examples impacted creative output in art. In Experiment 1, undergraduates made drawings under three conditions: copying an artist's drawing, then producing an original drawing; producing an original drawing without having seen another's work; and copying another artist's work, then reproducing that artist's style independently. We discovered that through copying unfamiliar abstract drawings, participants were able to produce creative drawings qualitatively different from the (...)
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  24.  48
    Is It What You Do, or When You Do It? The Roles of Contingency and Similarity in Pro‐Social Effects of Imitation.Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (8):1541-1552.
    Being imitated has a wide range of pro-social effects, but it is not clear how these effects are mediated. Naturalistic studies of the effects of being imitated have not established whether pro-social outcomes are due to the similarity and/or the contingency between the movements performed by the actor and those of the imitator. Similarity is often assumed to be the active ingredient, but we hypothesized that contingency might also be important, as it produces positive affect in infants and can be (...)
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  25.  20
    Do as I Say and as I Do: Imitation, Pedagogy, and Cumulative Culture.Ellen Fridland - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (4):355-377.
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  26. The Imitation Game.Keith Gunderson - 1964 - Mind 73 (April):234-45.
  27. Turing's Rules for the Imitation Game.Gualtiero Piccinini - 2000 - Minds and Machines 10 (4):573-582.
    In the 1950s, Alan Turing proposed his influential test for machine intelligence, which involved a teletyped dialogue between a human player, a machine, and an interrogator. Two readings of Turing's rules for the test have been given. According to the standard reading of Turing's words, the goal of the interrogator was to discover which was the human being and which was the machine, while the goal of the machine was to be indistinguishable from a human being. According to the literal (...)
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  28. Testing Turing's Parallel-Paired Imitation Game.Huma Shah & Kevin Warwick - 2010 - Kybernetes 39 (3).
    The purpose of this paper is to consider Turing's two tests for machine intelligence: the parallel-paired, three-participants game presented in his 1950 paper, and the “jury-service” one-to-one measure described two years later in a radio broadcast. Both versions were instantiated in practical Turing tests during the 18th Loebner Prize for artificial intelligence hosted at the University of Reading, UK, in October 2008. This involved jury-service tests in the preliminary phase and parallel-paired in the final phase.
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  29.  50
    Imitation, Skill Learning, and Conceptual Thought: An Embodied, Developmental Approach.Ellen Fridland - 2013 - In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. pp. 203--224.
  30.  52
    On the Imitation Game.John G. Stevenson - 1976 - Philosophia 6 (1):131-33.
  31.  22
    Reflections on Imitation, Vocal Mimicry, and Entrainment.Anton Killin - 2016 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (2):81-87.
    It is my contention that understanding natural phenomena such as vocal mimicry can bolster theories of the evolution of language and music as well as inform evolutionary and naturalistic aesthetics more generally. In this commentary I present this phenomena as a case study in order to stimulate further aesthetic theorising.
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  32.  10
    Imitation From a Joint Action Perspective.Luke McEllin, Günther Knoblich & Natalie Sebanz - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (4):342-354.
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  33. Imitation.Joel Weinsheimer - 1984
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  34.  44
    Nested Algorithms and the Original Imitation Game Test: A Reply to James Moor. [REVIEW]Susan G. Sterrett - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (1):131-136.
    In "The Status and Future of the Turing Test" (Moor, 2001), which appeared in an earlier issue of this journal, James Moor remarks on my paper "Turing's Two Tests for Intelligence." In my paper I had claimed that, whatever Turing may or may not have thought, the test described in the opening section of Turing's now legendary 1950 paper "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" is not equivalent to, and in fact is superior to, the test described in a passage that occurs (...)
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  35.  17
    Vicarious Reinforcement and Model's Behavior in Verbal Learning and Imitation.Karen J. Kaplan - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):448.
  36.  11
    The Competence of the Model and the Learning of Imitation and Non-Imitation.Milton E. Rosenbaum & Irving F. Tucker - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (2):183.
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  37.  8
    "Vicarious Reinforcement and Imitation in a Verbal Learning Situation": Erratum.Robert E. Phillips - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3, Pt.1):524-524.
  38. The Whole Internal Universe Imitation and the New Defense of Poetry in British Criticism, 1660-1830.John Mahoney - 1985
     
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  39. Plagiarism and Imitation During the English Renaissance.Harold Ogden White - 1935 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
     
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  40. The Shared Circuits Model (SCM): How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation, Deliberation, and Mindreading.Susan Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, (...)
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  41.  17
    Neonatal Imitation in Context: Sensorimotor Development in the Perinatal Period.Nazim Keven & Kathleen A. Akins - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Over 35 years ago, Meltzoff and Moore (1977) published their famous article ‘Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates’. Their central conclusion, that neonates can imitate, was and continues to be controversial. Here we focus on an often neglected aspect of this debate, namely on neonatal spontaneous behaviors themselves. We present a case study of a paradigmatic orofacial ‘gesture’, namely tongue protrusion and retraction (TP/R). Against the background of new research on mammalian aerodigestive development, we ask: How (...)
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  42.  34
    Imitation and ‘Infinite’ Will: Descartes on the Imago Dei.Marie Jayasekera - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:1-38.
    This paper investigates Descartes’s understanding of the imago Dei, that it is above all in virtue of the will that we bear the image and likeness of God. I challenge the key assumption of arguments that hold that Descartes’s comparison between the human will and the divine will is problematic—that in his conception of the imago Dei Descartes is alluding to Scholastic conceptions of analogy available to him at the time, which would place particular constraints on the legitimacy of the (...)
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  43.  63
    Imitation Reconsidered.Ellen Fridland & Richard Moore - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):856-880.
    In the past 20 years or so, the psychological research on imitation has flourished. However, our working definition of imitation has not adequately adapted in order to reflect this research. The closest that we've come to a revamped conception of imitation comes from the work of Michael Tomasello. Despite its numerous virtues, Tomasello's definition is in need of at least two significant amendments, if it is to reflect the current state of knowledge. Accordingly, it is our goal (...)
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  44.  23
    Vagueness and Imprecise Imitation in Signalling Games.Michael Franke & José Pedro Correia - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (4):1037-1067.
    Signalling games are popular models for studying the evolution of meaning, but typical approaches do not incorporate vagueness as a feature of successful signalling. Complementing recent like-minded models, we describe an aggregate population-level dynamic that describes a process of imitation of successful behaviour under imprecise perception and realization of similar stimuli. Applying this new dynamic to a generalization of Lewis’s signalling games, we show that stochastic imprecision leads to vague, yet by-and-large efficient signal use, and, moreover, that it unifies (...)
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  45.  5
    Pantomime and Imitation in Great Apes.Anne E. Russon - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):200-215.
    This paper assesses great apes’ abilities for pantomime and action imitation, two communicative abilities proposed as key contributors to language evolution. Modern great apes, the only surviving nonhuman hominids, are important living models of the communicative platform upon which language evolved. This assessment is based on 62 great ape pantomimes identified via data mining plus published reports of great ape action imitation. Most pantomimes were simple, imperative, and scaffolded by partners’ relationship and scripts; some resemble declaratives, some were (...)
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  46.  56
    Imitation as an Inheritance System.Nicholas Shea - 2009 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 364:2429-2443.
    What is the evolutionary significance of the various mechanisms of imitation, emulation and social learning found in humans and other animals? This paper presents an advance in the theoretical resources for addressing that question, in the light of which standard approaches from the cultural evolution literature should be refocused. The central question is whether humans have an imitationbased inheritance system—a mechanism that has the evolutionary function of transmitting behavioural phenotypes reliably down the generations. To have the evolutionary power of (...)
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  47.  62
    Imitation’ in Plato's Republic.J. Tate - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):16-23.
    It has become a standing reproach upon Plato's treatment of poetry in the Republic that he forgets or misrepresents in the tenth book what he said in the third. According to the earlier discussion, poetry is required to perform important services in the ideal state; its subject-matter will make the young familiar with true doctrines ; its style will reflect the qualities proper to the character of guardian, and therefore—by the principle of imitation—induce and confirm such qualities in the (...)
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  48.  73
    Imitation, Representation, and Humanity in Spinoza's Ethics.Justin Steinberg - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):383-407.
    In IVP50S, Spinoza claims that “one who is moved to aid others neither by reason nor by pity is rightly called inhuman. For (by IIIP27) he seems to be unlike a man” (IVP50S). At first blush, the claim seems implausible, as it relies on the dubious assumption that beings will necessarily imitate the affects of conspecifics. In the first two sections of this paper, I explain why Spinoza accepts this thesis and show how this claim can be made compatible with (...)
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  49.  11
    The Evolutionary Roots of Human Imitation, Action Understanding and Symbols.Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):183-199.
    This paper focuses on how human complex imitation and its developmental processes are related to the abilities for action representation, acquisition of symbols, and language. After overviewing the characteristics of imitation in chimpanzees and humans, I propose a model of imitation emphasizing how these two species differ in the ways they process visual-motor information. These differences may in turn contribute to core interspecies differences in higher-order cognitive functions, not only for bodily imitation but for action understanding (...)
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  50. Imitation in Infancy.Jacqueline Nadel & George Butterworth (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1999, this book brings together the extensive modern evidence for innate imitation in babies. Modern research has shown imitation to be a natural mechanism of learning and communication which deserves to be at centre stage in developmental psychology. Yet the very possibility of imitation in newborn humans has had a controversial history. Defining imitation has proved to be far from straightforward and scientific evidence for its existence in neonates is only now becoming accepted, (...)
     
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