Results for 'Implicit theories'

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  1.  79
    Implicit Theories of Intellectual Virtues and Vices: A Focus on Intellectual Humility.Peter L. Samuelson, Matthew J. Jarvinen, Thomas B. Paulus, Ian M. Church, Sam A. Hardy & Justin L. Barrett - 2014 - Journal of Positive Psychology 5 (10):389-406.
    The study of intellectual humility is still in its early stages and issues of definition and measurement are only now being explored. To inform and guide the process of defining and measuring this important intellectual virtue, we conducted a series of studies into the implicit theory – or ‘folk’ understanding – of an intellectually humble person, a wise person, and an intellectually arrogant person. In Study 1, 350 adults used a free-listing procedure to generate a list of descriptors, one (...)
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  2.  18
    Implicit Theories and Issue Characteristics as Determinants of Moral Awareness and Intentions.Kurt Wurthmann - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (1):93-116.
    Individuals’ implicit theories that people’s character is fixed versus malleable are associated with their holding beliefs that morality is primarily determined by fulfilling prescribed duties versus upholding basic rights of others, respectively. Three studies provide evidence that the ability to recognize that a situation can legitimately be considered from a moral point of view is interactively dependent upon the nature of perceivers’ implicit theories and the extent to which the issue involves a violation that emphasizes a (...)
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  3.  15
    The Implications of Teachers’ Implicit Theories for Moral Education: A Case Study From Finland.Inkeri Rissanen, Elina Kuusisto, Eija Hanhimäki & Kirsi Tirri - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (1):63-77.
    Implicit theories concerning the malleability of human qualities are known to have a powerful impact on motivation and learning, but their role in moral education is an under-researched topic. In this qualitative case study, we examined the impact of implicit theories on four Finnish teachers’ practices of teaching morally and in teaching morality. The data include preliminary and stimulated recall interviews as well as classroom observations. Our results demonstrate the multiple ways in which teachers’ implicit (...)
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  4.  3
    The Belief to Have Fixed or Malleable Traits and Help Giving: Implicit Theories and Sequential Social Influence Techniques.Kinga Lachowicz-Tabaczek & Malgorzata Gamian-Wilk - 2009 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 40 (2):85-100.
    The belief to have fixed or malleable traits and help giving: implicit theories and sequential social influence techniques Two sequential social influence techniques, the foot-in-the-door and the door-in-the-face, seem to be symmetrical, but there are different moderators and quite different mechanisms underlying each of the strategies. What links both techniques is the social interaction between a person presenting a sequence of requests and an interlocutor. The techniques' effectiveness depends on the course and perception of the interaction and the (...)
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  5.  19
    Relation of Implicit Theories to the Construction of Personal Histories.Michael Ross - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):341-357.
  6.  14
    Implicit Theories of Intelligence and Academic Achievement: A Meta-Analytic Review.Ana Costa & Luísa Faria - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  7.  70
    Implicit Theories as Organizers of Goals and Behavior.Carol S. Dweck - 1996 - In P. Gollwitzer & John A. Bargh (eds.), The Psychology of Action: Linking Cognition and Motivation to Behavior. Guilford. pp. 69--90.
  8.  16
    Implicit Theories of Emotion Shape Regulation of Negative Affect.Andreas Kappes & Andra Schikowski - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (5):952-960.
  9.  3
    Implicit Theories : Thier Impact on Technology Education.Wendy Dow - 2006 - In John R. Dakers (ed.), Defining Technological Literacy: Towards an Epistemological Framework. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 239--250.
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  10. Do Theories of Implicit Race Bias Change Moral Judgments?C. Daryl Cameron, Joshua Knobe & B. Keith Payne - 2010 - Social Justice Research 23:272-289.
    Recent work in social psychology suggests that people harbor “implicit race biases,” biases which can be unconscious or uncontrollable. Because awareness and control have traditionally been deemed necessary for the ascription of moral responsibility, implicit biases present a unique challenge: do we pardon discrimination based on implicit biases because of its unintentional nature, or do we punish discrimination regardless of how it comes about? The present experiments investigated the impact such theories have upon moral judgments about (...)
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  11.  16
    The Implicit Commitment of Arithmetical Theories and Its Semantic Core.Carlo Nicolai & Mario Piazza - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (4):913-937.
    According to the implicit commitment thesis, once accepting a mathematical formal system S, one is implicitly committed to additional resources not immediately available in S. Traditionally, this thesis has been understood as entailing that, in accepting S, we are bound to accept reflection principles for S and therefore claims in the language of S that are not derivable in S itself. It has recently become clear, however, that such reading of the implicit commitment thesis cannot be compatible with (...)
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  12.  5
    Implicit Perception in Visual Neglect: Implications for Theories of Attention.Marcie A. Wallace - 1994 - In Martha J. Farah & G. Ratcliff (eds.), The Neuropsychology of High-Level Vision. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 359.
  13.  13
    Implicit Leadership Theories in Eastern and Western Europe.Edvard Konrad - 2000 - Social Science Information 39 (2):335-347.
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  14.  6
    Opening the Implicit Leadership Theories’ Black Box: An Experimental Approach with Conjoint Analysis.Gustavo M. Tavares, Filipe Sobral, Rafael Goldszmidt & Felipe Araújo - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  15. Moral Growth Mindset is Associated with Change in Voluntary Service Engagement.Hyemin Han, Youn-Jeng Choi, Kelsie J. Dawson & Changwoo Jeong - 2018 - PLoS ONE 8 (13):e0202327.
    Incremental implicit theories are associated with a belief regarding it is possible to improve one’s intelligence or ability through efforts. Previous studies have demonstrated that incremental implicit theories contributed to better academic achievement and positive youth development. Our study aimed to examine whether incremental implicit theories of morality significantly influenced change in students’ engagement in voluntary service activities. In our study, 54 Korean college students for Study 1 and 180 Korean 8th graders for Study (...)
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  16.  79
    Psychological Explanation and Implicit Theory.Frank Jackson - 2000 - Philosophical Explorations 3 (1):83-95.
    I offer an account of the relation between explanations of behaviour in terms of psychological states and explanations in terms of neural states that: makes it transparent how they can be true together; explains why explanations in terms of psychological states are characteristically of behaviour described in general and relational terms, and explains why certain sorts of neurological investigations undermine psychological explanations of behaviour, while others leave them intact. In the course of the argument, I offer an account of (...) theories. (shrink)
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  17. Remedial Theories of Secession and Territorial Justification.Amandine Catala - 2013 - Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (1):74-94.
    Because secession centrally involves taking away a territory, a successful normative theory of secession must give a credible account of when a seceding group has a valid territorial claim. One of the most prominent types of normative theory of secession is remedial theories of secession. I argue that while remedial theories address the question of territorial justification, they fail to do so adequately, because their account is both arbitrary and internally inconsistent. I argue that addressing the question of (...)
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  18.  90
    The Ontology of Causal Process Theories.Anton Froeyman - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (3):523-538.
    There is a widespread belief that the so-called process theories of causation developed by Wesley Salmon and Phil Dowe have given us an original account of what causation really is. In this paper, I show that this is a misconception. The notion of “causal process” does not offer us a new ontological account of causation. I make this argument by explicating the implicit ontological commitments in Salmon and Dowe’s theories. From this, it is clear that Salmon’s Mark (...)
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  19.  30
    Religious “Avatars” and Implicit Religion: Recycling Myths and Religious Patterns Within Contemporary US Popular Culture.Andrada Fatu-Tutoveanu & Corneliu Pintilescu - 2012 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (33):182-205.
    Contemporary cultural and media studies have been increasingly interested in redefining the relations between religion and culture (and particularly popular culture). The present study approaches a series of theories on the manner in which religious aspects emerge and are integrated in contemporary cultural manifestations, focusing on the persistence/resurrection of religious patterns into secularized cultural contents. Thus, the analysis departs from the concept of implicit religion, coined and developed by Bailey and the theories following it, as well as (...)
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  20.  18
    “The Return of the Sacred”: Implicit Religion and Initiation Symbolism in Zvyagintsev’s Vozvrashchenie.Andrada Fătu-Tutoveanu - 2015 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (42):198-230.
    Recent studies have been increasingly interested in the connections between popular culture – cinema in particular – and religion, and most particularly in how traditional mythologies and religious frameworks and practices are recycled and reinterpreted within modern media. These interactions can be ranged from opposition to dialogue and move towards appropriation and even replacement, in terms of functions and impact. Departing from a series of theories – mainly that of “implicit religion”, coined by Bailey but also developed by (...)
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  21.  48
    Implicit Sequence Learning: The Truth is in the Details.Axel Cleeremans & L. JimC)nez - 1998 - In Michael A. Stadler & Peter A. Frensch (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Learning. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
    Over the past decade, sequence learning has gradually become a central paradigm through which to study implicit learning. In this chapter, we start by briefly summarizing the results obtained with different variants of the sequence learning paradigm. We distinguish three subparadigms in terms of whether the stimulus material is generated either by following a fixed and repeating sequence (e.g., Nissen & Bullemer, 1987), by relying on a complex set of rules from which one can produce several alternative deterministic sequences (...)
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  22.  9
    Perceptions of High Integrity Can Persist After Deception: How Implicit Beliefs Moderate Trust Erosion.Michael P. Haselhuhn, Maurice E. Schweitzer, Laura J. Kray & Jessica A. Kennedy - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (1):215-225.
    Scholars have assumed that trust is fragile: difficult to build and easily broken. We demonstrate, however, that in some cases trust is surprisingly robust—even when harmful deception is revealed, some individuals maintain high levels of trust in the deceiver. In this paper, we describe how implicit theories moderate the harmful effects of revealed deception on a key component of trust: perceptions of integrity. In a negotiation context, we show that people who hold incremental theories reduce perceptions of (...)
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  23.  89
    A Unified Theory of Implicit Attitudes, Stereotypes, Self-Esteem, and Self-Concept.Anthony Greenwald - manuscript
    This theoretical integration of social psychology’s main cognitive and affective constructs was shaped by 3 influences: (a) recent widespread interest in automatic and implicit cognition, (b) development of the Implicit Association Test (IAT; A. G. Greenwald, D. E. McGhee, & J. L. K. Schwartz, 1998), and (c) social psychology’s consistency theories of the 1950s, especially F. Heider’s (1958) balance theory. The balanced identity design is introduced as a method to test correlational predictions of the theory. Data obtained (...)
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  24. Implicit Attitudes and the Ability Argument.Wesley Buckwalter - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (11):2961-2990.
    According to one picture of the mind, decisions and actions are largely the result of automatic cognitive processing beyond our ability to control. This picture is in tension with a foundational principle in ethics that moral responsibility for behavior requires the ability to control it. The discovery of implicit attitudes contributes to this tension. According to the ability argument against moral responsibility, if we cannot control implicit attitudes, and implicit attitudes cause behavior, then we cannot be morally (...)
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  25. Making It Implicit: Brandom on Rule Following.Anandi Hattiangadi - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):419-431.
    In Making it Explicit, Brandom aims to articulate an account of conceptual content that accommodates its normati vity-a requirement on theories of content that Brandom traces to Wittgenstein’s rule following considerations. It is widely held that the normativity requirement cannot be met, or at least not with ease, because theories of content face an intractable dilemma. Brandom proposes to evade the dilemma by adopting a middle road---one that uses normative vocabulary, but treats norms as implicit in practices. (...)
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  26.  16
    Exploring Implicit and Explicit Aspects of Sense of Agency.James W. Moore, D. Middleton, Patrick Haggard & Paul C. Fletcher - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1748-1753.
    Sense of agency refers to the sense of initiating and controlling actions in order to influence events in the outside world. Recently, a distinction between implicit and explicit aspects of sense of agency has been proposed, analogous to distinctions found in other areas of cognition, notably learning. However, there is yet no strong evidence supporting separable implicit and explicit components of sense of agency. The so-called ‘Perruchet paradigm’ offers one of the few convincing demonstrations of separable implicit (...)
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  27. Towards a Constitutive Account of Implicit Narrativity.Fleur Jongepier - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (1):51-66.
    The standard reply to the critique that narrative theories of the self are either chauvinistic or trivial is to “go implicit”. Implicit narratives, it is argued, are necessary for diachronically structured self-experience, but do not require that such narratives should be wholly articulable life stories. In this paper I argue that the standard approach, which puts forward a phenomenological conception of implicit narratives, is ultimately unable to get out of the clutches of the dilemma. In its (...)
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  28.  21
    Exploring Implicit and Explicit Aspects of Sense of Agency.P. C. Fletcher J. W. Moore, D. Middleton, P. Haggard - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1748.
    Sense of agency refers to the sense of initiating and controlling actions in order to influence events in the outside world. Recently, a distinction between implicit and explicit aspects of sense of agency has been proposed, analogous to distinctions found in other areas of cognition, notably learning. However, there is yet no strong evidence supporting separable implicit and explicit components of sense of agency. The so-called ‘Perruchet paradigm’ offers one of the few convincing demonstrations of separable implicit (...)
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  29.  50
    Implicit Commitment in Theory Choice.Stephan Krämer - unknown
    The proper evaluation of a theory's virtues seems to require taking into account what the theory is indirectly or implicitly committed to, in addition to what it explicitly says. Most extant proposals for criteria of theory choice in the literature spell out the relevant notion of implicit commitment via some notion of entailment. I show that such criteria behave implausibly in application to theories that differ over matters of entailment. A recent defence by Howard Peacock of such a (...)
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  30. Entitlement Theories of Justice: From Nozick to Roemer and Beyond: Robert J. Van der Veen & Philippe Van Parijs.Robert J. van der Veen - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):69-81.
    In Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick contrasts entitlement theories of justice and “traditional” theories such as Rawls', utilitarianism or egalitarianism, and advocates the former against the latter. What exactly is an entitlement theory of justice? Nozick's book offers two distinct characterizations. On the one hand, he explicitly describes “the general outlines of the entitlement theory” as maintaining “that the holdings of a person are just if he is entitled to them by the principles of justice in acquisition (...)
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  31.  50
    Corporate Social Strategy: Competing Views From Two Theories of the Firm.Frances Bowen - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):97-113.
    This paper compares two theories of the firm used to interpret firms’ corporate social strategies in order to derive new insights and questions in this research area. Researchers from many branches of strategic management agree that firms can strategically allocate resources in order to achieve both long-term social objectives and competitive advantage. However, despite some progress in investigating corporate social strategy, studies rely on fundamentally diverging theoretical approaches. This paper will identify, compare and begin to integrate two competing (...) of the firm implicit in corporate social strategy scholarship: the resource-based and behavioural theories of the firm. I discuss the implications of these two theories for both researchers and practitioners on key debates within corporate social strategy, and conclude by suggesting several fruitful avenues for future research based on the emerging integration of these two theories of the firm within the strategy literature. (shrink)
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  32.  53
    There Are No Ahistorical Theories of Function.Justin Garson - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    Theories of function are conventionally divided up into historical and ahistorical ones. Proponents of ahistorical theories often cite the ahistoricity of their accounts as a major virtue. Here, I argue that none of the mainstream “ahistorical” accounts are actually ahistorical. All of them embed, implicitly or explicitly, an appeal to history. In Boorse’s goal-contribution account, history is latent in the idea of statistical-typicality. In the propensity theory, history is implicit in the idea of a species’ natural habitat. (...)
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  33.  33
    Implicit Attitudes and the Social Capacity for Free Will.Daphne Brandenburg - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (8):1215-1228.
    In this paper I ask what implicit attitudes tell us about our freedom. I analyze the relation between the literature on implicit attitudes and an important subcategory of theories of free will—self-disclosure accounts. If one is committed to such a theory, I suggest one may have to move to a more social conceptualization of the capacity for freedom. I will work out this argument in five sections. In the first section, I discuss the specific theories of (...)
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  34.  34
    Neuroscience Findings Are Consistent with Appraisal Theories of Emotion; but Does the Brain “Respect” Constructionism?Klaus R. Scherer - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):163-164.
    I reject Lindquist et al.'s implicit claim that all emotion theories other than constructionist ones subscribe to a approach. The neural mechanisms underlying relevance detection, reward, attention, conceptualization, or language use are consistent with many theories of emotion, in particular componential appraisal theories. I also question the authors' claim that the meta-analysis they report provides support for the specific assumptions of constructionist theories.
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  35.  16
    Explicit Feedback Maintains Implicit Knowledge.Andy D. Mealor & Zoltan Dienes - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):822-832.
    The role of feedback was investigated with respect to conscious and unconscious knowledge acquired during artificial grammar learning . After incidental learning of training sequences, participants classified further sequences in terms of grammaticality and reported their decision strategy with or without explicit veridical feedback. Sequences that disobeyed the learning structure conformed to an alternative structure. Feedback led to an increase in the amount of reported conscious knowledge of structure but did not increase its accuracy. Conversely, feedback maintained the accuracy of (...)
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  36.  9
    Can Implicit Appraisal Concepts Produce Emotion-Specific Effects? A Focus on Unfairness and Anger.Eddie Mw Tong, Deborah H. Tan & Yan Lin Tan - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):449-460.
    This research examined whether the non-conscious activation of an implicit appraisal concept could affect responses associated with the corresponding emotion as predicted by appraisal theories. Explicit and implicit emotional responses were examined. We focused on implicit unfairness and its effect on anger. The results show that subliminal activation of implicit unfairness affected implicit anger responses but not explicit anger feelings . The non-conscious effect of implicit unfairness was specific to anger, as no effect (...)
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  37.  35
    Implicit Proofs.Jan Krajíček - 2004 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 69 (2):387 - 397.
    We describe a general method how to construct from a propositional proof system P a possibly much stronger proof system iP. The system iP operates with exponentially long P-proofs described "implicitly" by polynomial size circuits. As an example we prove that proof system iEF, implicit EF, corresponds to bounded arithmetic theory $V_{2}^{1}$ and hence, in particular, polynomially simulates the quantified propositional calculus G and the $\pi_{1}^{b}-consequences$ of $S_{2}^{1}$ proved with one use of exponentiation. Furthermore, the soundness of iEF is (...)
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  38. Representational Theories of Phenomenal Character.Fiona Macpherson - 2000 - Dissertation, University of Stirling
    This thesis is an examination and critique of naturalistic representational theories of phenomenal character. Phenomenal character refers to the distinctive quality that perceptual and sensational experiences seem to have; it is identified with 'what it is like' to undergo experiences. The central claims of representationalism are that phenomenal character is identical with the content of experience and that all representational states, bearing appropriate relations to the cognitive system, are conscious experiences. These claims are taken to explain both how conscious (...)
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  39.  33
    Siting Praxeology. The Methodological Significance of “Public” in Theories of Social Practices.Robert Schmidt & Jörg Volbers - 2011 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (4):419-440.
    The concept of “site” is at the center of current debates in theories of social practices as well as in cultural anthropology. It is unclear, however, how to assess the associated methodological assumption that overriding social structures or cultural formations can manifest themselves in sites. The article draws on the conception of social practices and introduces the notion of “publicness” in order to explicate how and why sociality and social structures can be accessed through “siting”. Sites as well as (...)
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  40.  10
    Differentiating Theories From Evidence: The Development of Argument Evaluation Abilities in Adolescence and Early Adulthood.Petra Barchfeld & Beate Sodian - 2009 - Informal Logic 29 (4):396-416.
    An argument evaluation inventory distinguishing between different levels of theory-evidence differentiation was designed corresponding to the levels of argument observed in argument generation tasks. Five scenarios containing everyday theories about a social problem, and arguments to support those theories were presented to 170 participants from two age groups (15 and 22 years) and different educational tracks. Participants had to rate the validity of arguments proposed by a story figure, to support the theory, to choose the best argument, and (...)
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  41.  11
    Vocation in Theology-Based Nursing Theories.Mikael Lundmark - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (6):767-780.
    By using the concepts of intrinsicality/extrinsicality as analytic tools, the theology-based nursing theories of Ann Bradshaw and Katie Eriksson are analyzed regarding their explicit and/or implicit understanding of vocation as a motivational factor for nursing. The results show that both theories view intrinsic values as guarantees against reducing nursing practice to mechanistic applications of techniques and as being a way of reinforcing a high ethical standard. The theories explicitly (Bradshaw) or implicitly (Eriksson) advocate a vocational understanding (...)
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  42.  32
    Intransitive Accomplishments and the Lexicon: The Role of Implicit Arguments, Definiteness, and Reflexivity in Aspectual Composition.S. Engelberg - 2002 - Journal of Semantics 19 (4):369-416.
    Theories of aspectual composition assume that accomplishments arise when a transitive verb has an incremental theme argument which is realized as a quantized NP—foremost, an NP which is not a mass noun or a bare plural—in direct object position. A problem confronting this assumption is the large number of intransitive, unergative verbs in German and English that occur in accomplishment expressions. The paper argues that this problem can be solved within a standard theory of aspectual composition if additional, independently (...)
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  43.  16
    Poetics Before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry.Grace M. Ledbetter - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    Combining literary and philosophical analysis, this study defends an utterly innovative reading of the early history of poetics. It is the first to argue that there is a distinctively Socratic view of poetry and the first to connect the Socratic view of poetry with earlier literary tradition.Literary theory is usually said to begin with Plato's famous critique of poetry in the Republic. Grace Ledbetter challenges this entrenched assumption by arguing that Plato's earlier dialogues Ion, Protagoras, and Apology introduce a distinctively (...)
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  44.  65
    On the Impossibility of Empirical Controls of Scientific Theories – From the Point of View of a Psychologist.Hans Christoph Micko - 2004 - Foundations of Science 9 (4):405-413.
    . Standard considerations of philosophy of science are reformulated in psychological terms and arguments, suggesting a fundamental change in life perspective: subjective experiences or introspective data are subject to motivational biases and therefore not admitted as objective empirical facts in science, However, we never experience objects or events of the external world, i.e., so called objective facts, but exclusively subjective percepts or mental events. They are merely assumed to, but may or may not be accurate or distorted mental representations of (...)
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  45.  55
    The Metaphysics of Mind-Body Identity Theories.Fanny L. Epstein - 1973 - American Philosophical Quarterly 10 (2):111-121.
    The article is an attempt to uncover the metaphysical assumptions implicit in the otherwise highly scientific contemporary identity theories. 1) the identity statement, Being a philosophical interpretation of dualistic psychophysical correspondence, Requires for its support a justificatory ontological or linguistic premise. 2) the conception of the mental as the hidden, Unobservable, Subjective and private is a metaphysical distortion with historical roots in an empiricist and positivist interpretation of the cartesian dichotomy of thinking and extended thing. 3) acceptance of (...)
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  46.  69
    Why Were Two Theories (Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics) Deemed Logically Distinct, and yet Equivalent, in Quantum Mechanics?Slobodan Perovic - 2007 - In Christopher Lehrer (ed.), First Annual Conference in the Foundations and History of Quantum Physics. Max Planck Institute for History of Science.
    A recent rethinking of the early history of Quantum Mechanics deemed the late 1920s agreement on the equivalence of Matrix Mechanics and Wave Mechanics, prompted by Schrödinger’s 1926 proof, a myth. Schrödinger supposedly failed to achieve the goal of proving isomorphism of the mathematical structures of the two theories, while only later developments in the early 1930s, especially the work of mathematician John von Neumman (1932) provided sound proof of equivalence. The alleged agreement about the Copenhagen Interpretation, predicated to (...)
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  47. Characteristics of Consciousness in Collapse-Type Quantum Mind Theories.Imants Baruss - 2008 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (3):257-267.
    The purpose of this paper is to look at some of the apparent characteristics of consciousness in theories in which consciousness is said to play a role in the collapse of the state vector. In particular, these reflections are based primarily on the work of three theorists: Amit Goswami, Henry Stapp, and Evan Harris Walker. Upon looking at such theories, three characteristics of consciousness become apparent. The first is a volitional aspect of the mind that needs to be (...)
     
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  48.  34
    Implicit Knowledge: How It is Understood and Used in Feminist Theory.Alexis Shotwell - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):315-324.
    Feminist theorists have crafted diverse accounts of implicit knowing that exceed the purview of epistemology conventionally understood. I characterize this field as through examining thematic clusters of feminist work on implicit knowledge: phenomenological and foucauldian theories of embodiment; theories of affect and emotion; other forms of implicit knowledge. Within these areas, the umbrella concept of implicit knowledge (or understanding, depending on how it's framed) names either contingently unspoken or fundamentally nonpropositional but epistemically salient content (...)
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  49.  62
    Implicit Versus Explicit: An ACT-R Learning Perspective.Niels A. Taatgen - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):785-786.
    Dienes & Perner propose a theory of implicit and explicit knowledge that is not entirely complete. It does not address many of the empirical issues, nor does it explain the difference between implicit and explicit learning. It does, however, provide a possible unified explanation, as opposed to the more binary theories like the systems and the processing theories of implicit and explicit memory. Furthermore, it is consistent with a theory in which implicit learning is (...)
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  50.  8
    The Failings of Three Event Perception Theories.Heiko Hecht - 2000 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 30 (1):1–25.
    Empirical research on the perception of physical events is rarely designed to test a particular theory. The research often fails to be embedded in a larger theoretical context or it is carried out with the implicit goal to support a particular theoretical approach. I argue that this is not very productive. While three theories are relevant for our understanding of events, their limits have rarely been addressed. I expose these limits. The three theories or approaches are direct (...)
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