Results for 'Indrarini Laksmana'

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  1.  33
    Board Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility.Maretno Harjoto, Indrarini Laksmana & Robert Lee - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (4):641-660.
    This study examines the impact of board diversity on firms’ corporate social responsibility performance. Using seven different measures of board diversity across 1,489 U.S. firms from 1999 to 2011, the study finds that board diversity is positively associated with CSR performance. Board diversity is associated with a greater number of areas in which CSR is strong and a fewer number of areas in which CSR is a concern. These findings support the stakeholder theory and are consistent with the view that (...)
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  2.  19
    The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Risk Taking and Firm Value.Maretno Harjoto & Indrarini Laksmana - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):353-373.
    We hypothesize that CSR serves as a control mechanism to reduce deviations from optimal risk taking, and therefore, CSR curbs excessive risk taking and reduces excessive risk avoidance. Based on the stakeholder theory, firms with CSR focus must balance the interests of multiple stakeholders, and therefore, managers must allocate resources to satisfy both investing and non-investing stakeholders’ interests. Using five measures of corporate risk taking and a sample of 1718 US firms during 1998 to 2011, we find that stronger CSR (...)
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  3.  3
    Lakṣmana's SūktiratnakoṣaLaksmana's Suktiratnakosa.Ernest Bender & Nilanjana S. Shah - 1984 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 104 (4):789.
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  4.  6
    Jasaharacariu of PuṣpadantaJasaharacariu of Puspadanta.Ernest Bender, Parasurama Laksmana Vaidya & Hiralal Jain - 1975 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 95 (2):355.
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  5.  7
    Dharmakośa. Saṃskārakāṇḍa Vol. III. Part 1Dharmakosa. Samskarakanda Vol. III. Part 1.Ludwik Sternbach, Lakṣmaṇa Śāstri Jośī & Laksmana Sastri Josi - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (2):270.
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  6.  7
    Dharmakośa. Upaniṣatkāṇḍa. Vol. II, Parts 1 to 4Dharmakosa. Upanisatkanda. Vol. II, Parts 1 to 4.Ludwik Sternbach, Lakṣmaṇa Śāstri Jośī & Laksmana Sastri Josi - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (4):595.
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  7.  2
    The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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    The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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  9.  1
    The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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  10. The Persian Writings on Vedānta Attributed to Banwālīdās Walī.Supriya Gandhi - 2020 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 48 (1):79-99.
    The Mughal court was the main sponsor of Persian works on Vedānta, broadly conceived, from the late sixteenth until the mid-seventeenth century. Thereafter, the audience for such works shifted outside the court. Several Hindus literate in Persian composed or circulated Vedāntic writings. This article surveys three hitherto neglected Persian texts treating Vedānta that appear to have been composed independently from court sponsorship. All three are attributed to Banwālīdās Walī. They comprise the Gulzār-i ḥāl [Rose-garden of ecstatic states], which is itself (...)
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