Results for 'Infinite History'

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  1.  27
    To Infinity and Beyond: A Cultural History of the Infinite.Eli Maor - 1987 - Princeton University Press.
    Eli Maor examines the role of infinity in mathematics and geometry and its cultural impact on the arts and sciences. He evokes the profound intellectual impact the infinite has exercised on the human mind--from the "horror infiniti" of the Greeks to the works of M. C. Escher from the ornamental designs of the Moslems, to the sage Giordano Bruno, whose belief in an infinite universe led to his death at the hands of the Inquisition. But above all, the (...)
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  2.  60
    The Infinite Sphere: Comments on the History of a Metaphor.Karsten Harries - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1):5-15.
  3. The Horizon: A History of Our Infinite Longing.Didier Maleuvre - 2011 - University of California Press.
    What is a horizon? A line where land meets sky? The end of the world or the beginning of perception? In this brilliant, engaging, and stimulating history, Didier Maleuvre journeys to the outer reaches of human experience and explores philosophy, religion, and art to understand our struggle and fascination with limits—of life, knowledge, existence, and death. Maleuvre sweeps us through a vast cultural landscape, enabling us to experience each stopping place as the cusp of a limitless journey, whether he (...)
     
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  4. 5. Infinite Ends at Work in History.Terry Pinkard - 2017 - In Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice. Harvard University Press. pp. 140-170.
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  5. Avicennan Infinity: A Select History of the Infinite Through Avicenna.Jon Mcginnis - 2010 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 21:199-222.
     
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  6.  6
    The Horizon: A History of Our Infinite Longing. By Didier Maleuvre. Pp. Xxi, 363. Berkeley, University of California Press, 2011, £19.95. [REVIEW]Jonathan Wright - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (1):169-169.
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  7. Part V. Perspectives on Infinity From Philosophy and Theology : 11. God and Infinity : Directions for Future Research / Graham Oppy ; 12. Notes on the Concept of the Infinite in the History of Western Metaphysics / David Bentley Hart ; 13. God and Infinity : Theological Insights From Cantor's Mathematics / Robert J. Russell ; 14. A Partially Skeptical Response to Hart and Russell. [REVIEW]Denys A. Turner - 2011 - In Michał Heller & W. H. Woodin (eds.), Infinity: New Research Frontiers. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  8. The Horizon: A History of Our Infinite Longing. [REVIEW]Jonathan Wright - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (1):169-169.
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  9.  44
    Measure of a Different Greatness: The Intensive Infinite, 1250-1650.Anne Ashley Davenport - 1999 - Brill.
    This volume examines a selection of late medieval works devoted to the intensive infinite in order to draw a comprehensive picture of the context, character and ...
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  10.  36
    Infinite Regresses of Justification.Oliver Black - 1988 - International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):421-437.
    This paper uses a schema for infinite regress arguments to provide a solution to the problem of the infinite regress of justification. The solution turns on the falsity of two claims: that a belief is justified only if some belief is a reason for it, and that the reason relation is transitive.
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  11.  79
    Infinity: New Research Frontiers.Michał Heller & W. H. Woodin (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Rudy Rucker; Part I. Perspectives on Infinity from History: 1. Infinity as a transformative concept in science and theology Wolfgang Achtner; Part II. Perspectives on Infinity from Mathematics: 2. The mathematical infinity Enrico Bombieri; 3. Warning signs of a possible collapse of contemporary mathematics Edward Nelson; Part III. Technical Perspectives on Infinity from Advanced Mathematics: 4. The realm of the infinite W. Hugh Woodin; 5. A potential subtlety concerning the distinction between determinism and (...)
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  12.  24
    Anti-Dualism in History and Nature: A Study Between John Dewey and José Ortega y Gasset.Marnie Binder - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (1):44-64.
    This paper argues that a principle manner in which Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset’s historicist maxim ’man has no nature, what he has is history’ can be understood is through a pragmatist basis of anti-dualism, in part inherited from American philosopher John Dewey. The thesis here is that it is not that man has no nature, per se, rather that history is his nature because the two are anti-dualistic concepts; history is our nature because it is (...)
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  13. Measuring the Size of Infinite Collections of Natural Numbers: Was Cantor's Theory of Infinite Number Inevitable?Paolo Mancosu - 2009 - Review of Symbolic Logic 2 (4):612-646.
    Cantor’s theory of cardinal numbers offers a way to generalize arithmetic from finite sets to infinite sets using the notion of one-to-one association between two sets. As is well known, all countable infinite sets have the same ‘size’ in this account, namely that of the cardinality of the natural numbers. However, throughout the history of reflections on infinity another powerful intuition has played a major role: if a collection A is properly included in a collection B then (...)
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  14. The Infinite.A. W. Moore - 1990 - Routledge.
    This historical study of the infinite covers all its aspects from the mathematical to the mystical. Anyone who has ever pondered the limitlessness of space and time, or the endlessness of numbers, or the perfection of God will recognize the special fascination of the subject. Beginning with an entertaining account of the main paradoxes of the infinite, including those of Zeno, A.W. Moore traces the history of the topic from Aristotle to Kant, Hegel, Cantor, and Wittgenstein.
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  15.  18
    David Hume's Critique of Infinity.Dale Jacquette - 2001 - Brill.
    The present work considers Hume's critique of infinity in historical context as a product of Enlightenment theory of knowledge, and assesses the prospects of ...
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  16.  29
    Infinity and Continuity in Ancient and Medieval Thought.Norman Kretzmann (ed.) - 1982 - Cornell University Press.
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  17. De la Théologie aux Mathématiques: L'Infini au XIVe Siècle.Joël Biard & J. Celeyrette (eds.) - 2005 - Belles Lettres.
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  18.  22
    John Venn's Hypothetical Infinite Frequentism and Logic.Lukas M. Verburgt - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (3):248-271.
    The goal of this paper is to provide a detailed reading of John Venn's Logic of Chance as a work of logic or, more specifically, as a specific portion of the general system of so-called ‘material’ logic developed in his Principles of Empirical or Inductive Logic and to discuss it against the background of his Boolean-inspired views on the connection between logic and mathematics. It is by means of this situating of Venn 1866 [The Logic of Chance. An Essay on (...)
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  19.  1
    Temporal Foundations in the Construction of History: Two Essays.Frederic Will - 2009 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 5 (2):161-177.
    The two essays included here are parts of a longer study of temporality, and the genesis of the “religious.” The first part, “Multiple Nows,” depicts a universe in which a present to past relation is establishable from any and every point in consciousness. The resulting perspective differs from that offered by the linear timeline of chronological history. Remembering where I put my glasses is an historicizing act, as fully as is remembering when the Battle of Zama was fought or (...)
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  20. I͡azyk I Realʹnostʹ.N. I. Beresneva - 2004 - Permskiĭ Gos. Universitet.
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  21. Wu Xian de Tan Suo.Hongliang Shen - 2010 - Qing Hua da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  22. Temporal Foundations in the Construction of History: Two Essays.Will Frederic - 2009 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 5 (2):161-177.
    The two essays included here are parts of a longer study of temporality, and the genesis of the “religious.” The first part, “Multiple Nows,” depicts a universe in which a present to past relation is establishable from any and every point in consciousness. The resulting perspective differs from that offered by the linear timeline of chronological history. Remembering where I put my glasses is an historicizing act, as fully as is remembering when the Battle of Zama was fought or (...)
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  23. Kant on Complete Determination and Infinite Judgement.Nicholas Stang - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1117-1139.
    In the Transcendental Ideal Kant discusses the principle of complete determination: for every object and every predicate A, the object is either determinately A or not-A. He claims this principle is synthetic, but it appears to follow from the principle of excluded middle, which is analytic. He also makes a puzzling claim in support of its syntheticity: that it represents individual objects as deriving their possibility from the whole of possibility. This raises a puzzle about why Kant regarded it as (...)
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  24.  72
    Achievements and Fallacies in Hume's Account of Infinite Divisibility.James Franklin - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (1):85-101.
    Throughout history, almost all mathematicians, physicists and philosophers have been of the opinion that space and time are infinitely divisible. That is, it is usually believed that space and time do not consist of atoms, but that any piece of space and time of non-zero size, however small, can itself be divided into still smaller parts. This assumption is included in geometry, as in Euclid, and also in the Euclidean and non- Euclidean geometries used in modern physics. Of the (...)
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  25. Schemata: The Concept of Schema in the History of Logic.John Corcoran - 2006 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (2):219-240.
    The syllogistic figures and moods can be taken to be argument schemata as can the rules of the Stoic propositional logic. Sentence schemata have been used in axiomatizations of logic only since the landmark 1927 von Neumann paper [31]. Modern philosophers know the role of schemata in explications of the semantic conception of truth through Tarski’s 1933 Convention T [42]. Mathematical logicians recognize the role of schemata in first-order number theory where Peano’s second-order Induction Axiom is approximated by Herbrand’s Induction-Axiom (...)
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  26. Infinite in All Directions: Gifford Lectures Given at Aberdeen, Scotland, April-November 1985.Freeman J. Dyson - 1988 - Perennial.
    Infinite in All Directions is a popularized science at its best. In Dyson's view, science and religion are two windows through which we can look out at the world around us. The book is a revised version of a series of the Gifford Lectures under the title "In Praise of Diversity" given at Aberdeen, Scotland. They allowed Dyson the license to express everything in the universe, which he divided into two parts in polished prose: focusing on the diversity of (...)
     
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  27.  29
    Leibniz on Infinite Numbers, Infinite Wholes, and Composite Substances.Adam Harmer - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):236-259.
    Leibniz claims that nature is actually infinite but rejects infinite number. Are his mathematical commitments out of step with his metaphysical ones? It is widely accepted that Leibniz has a viable response to this problem: there can be infinitely many created substances, but no infinite number of them. But there is a second problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved. It has been suggested that Leibniz’s argument against the world soul relies on his rejection of infinite (...)
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  28.  54
    C.K. Raju. Cultural Foundations of Mathematics: The Nature of Mathematical Proof and the Transmission of the Calculus From India to Europe in the 16th C. Ce. History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization. [REVIEW]José Ferreirós - 2009 - Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):nkn028.
    This book is part of a major project undertaken by the Centre for Studies in Civilizations , being one of a total of ninety-six planned volumes. The author is a statistician and computer scientist by training, who has concentrated on historical matters for the last ten years or so. The book has very ambitious aims, proposing an alternative philosophy of mathematics and a deviant history of the calculus. Throughout, there is an emphasis on the need to combine history (...)
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  29.  14
    Civilization, Mode of Production, Ages of History and the Three-Legged Movements.Pedro Geiger - 2011 - Dialogue and Universalism 21 (1):123-134.
    Since its presumed origin by the big bang, about 14 pasts billion years, the Universe is composed of entities, or objects, that produce movements that produce new objects that produce new movements, in an endless sequence.The human mind is one of these entities, whose movements are capable to produce many objects, materialized or as ideas. Those objects in their turn will interact with the mind and new movements will be produced. This process had composed the history of mankind.The Nature (...)
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  30.  5
    Levinas' Critique of Heidegger in Totality and Infinite.Eduardo Sabrovsky - 2011 - Ideas Y Valores 60 (145):55-68.
    The article examines the critique of Being and Time formulated by Levinas in Totality and Infinite, a critique centered on Heidegger’s omission of two fundamental forms of being in the world: enjoyment and inhabiting. This omission is symptomatic: as a critique of modernity, Being and Time internalizes and ontologizes the prevalence of the equipmentality that characterizes our era far more than scientific objectivism does. Thus, a certain type of pragmatism would constitute the keystone of Being and Time as a (...)
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  31. Hegel and the Infinite: Religion, Politics, and Dialectic.Slavoj ŽI.žek, Clayton Crockett & Creston Davis (eds.) - 2011 - Columbia University Press.
    Catherine Malabou, Antonio Negri, John D. Caputo, Bruno Bosteels, Mark C. Taylor, and Slavoj Zizek join seven others--including William Desmond, Katrin Pahl, Adrian Johnston, Edith Wyschogrod, and Thomas A. Lewis--to apply Hegel's thought to twenty-first-century philosophy, politics, and religion. Doing away with claims that the evolution of thought and history is at an end, these thinkers safeguard Hegel's innovations against irrelevance and, importantly, reset the distinction of secular and sacred. These original contributions focus on Hegelian analysis and the transformative (...)
     
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  32. Time-Fetishes: The Secret History of Eternal Recurrence.Ned Lukacher - 1999 - Duke University Press.
    For over two and a half millennia human beings have attempted to invent strategies to “discover” the truth of time, to determine whether time is infinite, whether eternity is the infinite duration of a continuous present, or whether it too rises and falls with the cycles of universal creation and destruction. _Time-Fetishes_ recounts the history of a tradition that runs counter to the dominant tradition in Western metaphysics, which has sought to purify eternity of its temporal character. (...)
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  33. No Sense of History Beyond the History We Sense.Theo Salemink - 2005 - Bijdragen 61 (4):437-458.
    A question that occupies centre stage in what the Germans call ‘Zeitgeschichte’ – the historiography of our own time, i.e. the nineteenth and especially the twentieth century, reads: How much inner coherence can still be discerned in this modern age with its unprecedented change and devastation? Is there any significant meaning for humanity to be ‘discovered’ in the near infinite number of events that fill this period? Does religion and God still make sense? In this essay, which is an (...)
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  34. There Must Be A First: Why Thomas Aquinas Rejects Infinite, Essentially Ordered, Causal Series.Caleb Cohoe - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):838 - 856.
    Several of Thomas Aquinas's proofs for the existence of God rely on the claim that causal series cannot proceed in infinitum. I argue that Aquinas has good reason to hold this claim given his conception of causation. Because he holds that effects are ontologically dependent on their causes, he holds that the relevant causal series are wholly derivative: the later members of such series serve as causes only insofar as they have been caused by and are effects of the earlier (...)
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  35.  43
    Leibniz on Wholes, Unities, and Infinite Number.Gregory Brown - 2000 - The Leibniz Review 10:21-51.
    One argument that Leibniz employed to rule out the possibility of a world soul appears to turn on the assumption that the very notion of an infinite number or of an infinite whole is inconsistent. This argument was considered in a series of three papers published in The Leibniz Review: in the first, by Laurence Carlin, the argument was delineated and analyzed; in the second, by myself, the argument was criticized and rejected; in the third, by Richard Arthur, (...)
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  36.  61
    Complexity, Existence and Infinite Analysis.Giovanni Merlo - 2012 - The Leibniz Review 22:9-36.
    According to Leibniz’s infinite-analysis account of contingency, any derivative truth is contingent if and only if it does not admit of a finite proof. Following a tradition that goes back at least as far as Bertrand Russell, several interpreters have been tempted to explain this biconditional in terms of two other principles: first, that a derivative truth is contingent if and only if it contains infinitely complex concepts and, second, that a derivative truth contains infinitely complex concepts if and (...)
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  37.  29
    Infinite Accumulations and Pantheistic Implications.Laurence Carlin - 1997 - The Leibniz Review 7:1-24.
    Throughout his early writings, Leibniz was concerned with developing an acceptable account of God's relationship to the created world. In some of these early writings, he endorsed the idea that this relationship was similar to the human soul's relationship to the body. Though he eventually came to reject this idea, theanima mundi thesis remained the topic of several essays and correspondences during his career, culminating in the correspondence with Clarke. At first glance,Leibniz's discussions of this thesis may seem less important (...)
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  38.  21
    The Manifestation of Self-Consciousness in the Concrete “I Am”. Finite and Infinite Ego in the Thought of S.T. Coleridge. [REVIEW]Norbert Herold - 1984 - Philosophy and History 17 (1):46-48.
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  39.  34
    Infinite Divisibility in Hume's First Enquiry.Dale Jacquette - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (2):219-240.
    This paper examines Hume's arguments against the infinite divisibility of extension in the first _Enquiry<D>, notes to sections 124 and 125. Hume's reference to the problem of infinite divisibility as an illustration of skepticism about the limitations of reason are compared with his longer treatment of the topic in _Treatise<D> I.2. It is conjectured that Hume's reliance on Berkeley's refutation of abstract general ideas in the famous 'hint' of _Enquiry<D> 125 reflects his later acceptance of what he came (...)
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  40.  2
    Infinite and Limited.Ohad Nachtomy - 2016 - The Leibniz Review 26:179-196.
    This paper develops some important observations from a recent article by Maria Rosa Antognazza published in The Leibniz Review 2015 under the title “The Hypercategorematic Infinite”, from which I take up the characterization of God, the most perfect Being, as infinite in a hypercategorematic sense, i.e., as a being beyond any determination. By contrast, creatures are determinate beings, and are thus limited and particular expressions of the divine essence. But since Leibniz takes both God and creatures to be (...)
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  41.  30
    Infinite Causal Chains and Explanation.Michael Rota - 2007 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:109-122.
    Many cosmological arguments for the existence of a first cause or a necessary being rely on a premise which denies the possibility of an infinite regress ofsome particular sort. Adequate and satisfying support for this premise, however, is not always provided. In this paper I attempt to address this gap in the literature. After discussing the notion of a causal explanation (section I), I formulate three principles which govern any successful causal explanation (section II). I then introduce the notions (...)
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  42. Boundlessness and Iteration: Some Observations About the Meaning of Άεί in Aristotle.Monica Ugaglia - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science (2):193-213.
    The aim of the paper is to show that the iterative (local and atemporal) meaning of the adverb ἀεί has a function of primary importance in Aristotle’s system, and that its use is strictly connected with the technical use of the same term in mathematics.
     
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  43.  1
    Is Every Possibility Actualized in an Infinite Period of Time?Ken Siegel - 1977 - Philosophy Research Archives 3:233-241.
    It has often been thought that the existence of an infinite amount of time implies the realization of all possibilities. However, it can be proved that it is not true that for any T, if T is an infinite period of time, then every possibility is actualized in T. The proof works for any sense of 'possibility' in which there are possibilities that cannot be actualized simultaneously.It still might be argued that if there is an infinite amount (...)
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  44. Världsmaskinen: Emanuel Swedenborgs Naturfilosofi.David Dunér - 2004 - Bokförlaget Nya Doxa.
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  45. Endlichkeit Und Transzendenz: Perspektiven Einer Grundbeziehung.Jakub Sirovátka (ed.) - 2012 - Meiner.
    Weder soll die Endlichkeit in ihrer Eigenständigkeit aufgelöst noch die Transzendenz aufgehoben werden. Das Absolute ist sowohl in seiner radikalen Transzendenz als auch in der Beziehung zum Menschen zu denken.
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  46. A Keletkezés Ontológiája: A Végtelen Fenomenológiája.Zsigmond Szabó - 2005 - Magyar Filozófiai Társaság.
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  47. Critical Phenomena and Breaking Drops: Infinite Idealizations in Physics.Robert Batterman - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (2):225-244.
    Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics are related to one another through the so-called "thermodynamic limit'' in which, roughly speaking the number of particles becomes infinite. At critical points (places of physical discontinuity) this limit fails to be regular. As a result, the "reduction'' of Thermodynamics to Statistical Mechanics fails to hold at such critical phases. This fact is key to understanding an argument due to Craig Callender to the effect that the thermodynamic limit leads to mistakes in Statistical Mechanics. I (...)
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  48. Descartes's Argument for the Existence of the Idea of an Infinite Being.Anat Schechtman - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):487-517.
    the meditations on first philosophy presents us with an alleged proof for the existence of God that proceeds from the existence of an idea of an infinite being in the human mind—an idea of God—to the existence of God himself. Insofar as we have an idea of an infinite being, an idea with “infinite objective reality,” we can legitimately ask whence it came to us. The only possible cause of this idea, claims Descartes, is an infinite (...)
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  49.  45
    Leibniz on Infinite Number, Infinite Wholes, and the Whole World.Richard Arthur - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:103-116.
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  50.  50
    Infinite Number and the World Soul; in Defence of Carlin and Leibniz.Richard Arthur - 1999 - The Leibniz Review 9:105-116.
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