Results for 'Informed Consent'

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  1. Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics.Neil C. Manson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Informed consent is a central topic in contemporary biomedical ethics. Yet attempts to set defensible and feasible standards for consenting have led to persistent difficulties. In Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics Neil Manson and Onora O'Neill set debates about informed consent in medicine and research in a fresh light. They show why informed consent cannot be fully specific or fully explicit, and why more specific consent is not always ethically better. They (...)
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  2.  43
    Nudging, Informed Consent and Bullshit.William Simkulet - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (8):536-542.
    Some philosophers have argued that during the process of obtaining informed consent, physicians should try to nudge their patients towards consenting to the option the physician believes best, where a nudge is any influence that is expected to predictably alter a person’s behaviour without restricting her options. Some proponents of nudging even argue that it is a necessary and unavoidable part of securing informed consent. Here I argue that nudging is incompatible with obtaining informed (...). I assume informed consent requires that a physician tells her patient the truth about her options and argue that nudging is incompatible with truth-telling. Instead, nudging satisfies Harry Frankfurt’s account of bullshit. (shrink)
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  3. Unethical Informed Consent Caused by Overlooking Poorly Measured Nocebo Effects.Jeremy Howick - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16:00-03.
    Unlike its friendly cousin the placebo effect, the nocebo effect (the effect of expecting a negative outcome) has been almost ignored. Epistemic and ethical confusions related to its existence have gone all but unnoticed. Contrary to what is often asserted, adverse events following from taking placebo interventions are not necessarily nocebo effects; they could have arisen due to natural history. Meanwhile, ethical informed consent (in clinical trials and clinical practice) has centred almost exclusively on the need to inform (...)
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  4. Informed Consent and Relational Conceptions of Autonomy.N. Stoljar - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (4):375-384.
    The received view in medical contexts is that informed consent is both necessary and sufficient for patient autonomy. This paper argues that informed consent is not sufficient for patient autonomy, at least when autonomy is understood as a "relational" concept. Relational conceptions of autonomy, which have become prominent in the contemporary literature, draw on themes in the thought of Charles Taylor. I first identify four themes in Taylor's work that together constitute a picture of human agency (...)
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  5.  91
    Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW]Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno - 1994 - HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received (...)
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  6. Informed Consent to HIV Cure Research.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph R. Millum - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):108-113.
    Trials with highly unfavourable risk–benefit ratios for participants, like HIV cure trials, raise questions about the quality of the consent of research participants. Why, it may be asked, would a person with HIV who is doing well on antiretroviral therapy be willing to jeopardise his health by enrolling in such a trial? We distinguish three concerns: first, how information is communicated to potential participants; second, participants’ motivations for enrolling in potentially high risk research with no prospect of direct benefit; (...)
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  7.  34
    Informed Consent in Implantable BCI Research: Identifying Risks and Exploring Meaning.Eran Klein - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1299-1317.
    Implantable brain–computer interface technology is an expanding area of engineering research now moving into clinical application. Ensuring meaningful informed consent in implantable BCI research is an ethical imperative. The emerging and rapidly evolving nature of implantable BCI research makes identification of risks, a critical component of informed consent, a challenge. In this paper, 6 core risk domains relevant to implantable BCI research are identified—short and long term safety, cognitive and communicative impairment, inappropriate expectations, involuntariness, affective impairment, (...)
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  8. Informed Consent: Its History, Meaning, and Present Challenges.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (4):515-523.
    The practice of obtaining informed consent has its history in, and gains its meaning from, medicine and biomedical research. Discussions of disclosure and justified nondisclosure have played a significant role throughout the history of medical ethics, but the term “informed consent” emerged only in the 1950s. Serious discussion of the meaning and ethics of informed consent began in medicine, research, law, and philosophy only around 1972.
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  9. Should Informed Consent Be Based on Rational Beliefs?J. Savulescu & R. W. Momeyer - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):282-288.
    Our aim is to expand the regulative ideal governing consent. We argue that consent should not only be informed but also based on rational beliefs. We argue that holding true beliefs promotes autonomy. Information is important insofar as it helps a person to hold the relevant true beliefs. But in order to hold the relevant true beliefs, competent people must also think rationally. Insofar as information is important, rational deliberation is important. Just as physicians should aim to (...)
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  10.  47
    Informed Consent and the Requirement to Ensure Understanding.Tom Walker - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):50-62.
    It is generally held that doctors and researchers have an obligation to obtain informed consent. Over time there has been a move in relation to this obligation from a requirement to disclose information to a requirement to ensure that that information is understood. Whilst this change has been resisted, in this article I argue that both sides on this matter are mistaken. When investigating what information is needed for consent to be informed we might be trying (...)
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  11.  81
    Informed Consent Instead of Assent is Appropriate in Children From the Age of Twelve: Policy Implications of New Findings on Children’s Competence to Consent to Clinical Research.Irma M. Hein, Martine C. De Vries, Pieter W. Troost, Gerben Meynen, Johannes B. Van Goudoever & Ramón J. L. Lindauer - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundFor many decades, the debate on children’s competence to give informed consent in medical settings concentrated on ethical and legal aspects, with little empirical underpinnings. Recently, data from empirical research became available to advance the discussion. It was shown that children’s competence to consent to clinical research could be accurately assessed by the modified MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research. Age limits for children to be deemed competent to decide on research participation have been studied: generally (...)
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  12.  23
    Informed Consent Practices for Surgical Care at University Teaching Hospitals: A Case in a Low Resource Setting.Joseph Ochieng, Charles Ibingira, William Buwembo, Ian Munabi, Haruna Kiryowa, David Kitara, Paul Bukuluki, Gabriel Nzarubara & Erisa Mwaka - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):40.
    Informed consent in medical practice is essential and a global standard that should be sought at all the times doctors interact with patients. Its intensity would vary depending on the invasiveness and risks associated with the anticipated treatment. To our knowledge there has not been any systematic review of consent practices to document best practices and identify areas that need improvement in our setting. The objective of the study was to evaluate the informed consent practices (...)
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  13.  18
    Informed Consent in Health Research: Challenges and Barriers in Low‐and Middle‐Income Countries with Specific Reference to Nepal.R. Regmi Pramod, Aryal Nirmal, Kurmi Om, Pant Puspa Raj, Teijlingen Edwin & P. Wasti Sharada - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (2):84-89.
    Obtaining ‘informed consent’ from every individual participant involved in health research is a mandatory ethical practice. Informed consent is a process whereby potential participants are genuinely informed about their role, risk and rights before they are enrolled in the study. Thus, ethics committees in most countries require ‘informed consent form’ as part of an ethics application which is reviewed before granting research ethics approval. Despite a significant increase in health research activity in low-and (...)
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  14.  36
    Informed Consent and Nudging.William Simkulet - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):169-184.
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  15.  75
    Does Informed Consent to Research Require Comprehension?Gopal Sreenivasan - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:85-93.
    According to the standard view of informed consent, a prospective subject's consent to participate in a research study is invalid if the individual fails to comprehend the information about the study standardly disclosed to him. I argue that this involves three mistakes. First, the standard view confuses an ethical aspiration with a minimum ethical standard. Second, it assigns the entire responsibility for producing comprehension in study participants to the investigators. Most importantly, the standard view requires the termination (...)
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  16.  57
    Abandoning Informed Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (2):5-12.
  17.  58
    Using Informed Consent to Save Trust.Nir Eyal - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):437-444.
    Increasingly, bioethicists defend informed consent as a safeguard for trust in caretakers and medical institutions. This paper discusses an ‘ideal type’ of that move. What I call the trust-promotion argument for informed consent states:1. Social trust, especially trust in caretakers and medical institutions, is necessary so that, for example, people seek medical advice, comply with it, and participate in medical research.2. Therefore, it is usually wrong to jeopardise that trust.3. Coercion, deception, manipulation and other violations of (...)
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  18.  22
    Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection.Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo van de Poel & Neelke Doorn - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):123-138.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent (...)
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  19. Beyond Informed Consent: The Therapeutic Misconception and Trust.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & A. Ho - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):202-205.
    The therapeutic misconception has been seen as presenting an ethical problem because failure to distinguish the aims of research participation from those receiving ordinary treatment may seriously undermine the informed consent of research subjects. Hence, most theoretical and empirical work on the problems of the therapeutic misconception has been directed to evaluate whether, and to what degree, this confusion invalidates the consent of subjects. We argue here that this focus on the understanding component of informed (...), while important, might be too narrow to capture the ethical complexity of the therapeutic misconception. We show that concerns about misplaced trust and exploitation of such trust are also relevant, and ought to be taken into account, when considering why the therapeutic misconception matters ethically. (shrink)
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  20.  19
    Rethinking Informed Consent in Research on Heroin‐Assisted Treatment.Susanne Uusitalo & Barbara Broers - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (7):462-469.
    Can heroin addicts give consent to research on trials in which heroin is prescribed to them? Analyses of addicts and informed consent have been objects of debate in several articles. Informed consent requires the agent not only to be competent but also to give consent voluntarily. This has been questioned because of alleged features of heroin addiction. Until recently the discussion has focused on heroin addicts' desires for heroin, whether these are irresistible and thus (...)
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  21. Informed Consent, Big Data, and the Oxymoron of Research That Is Not Research.John P. A. Ioannidis - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):40 - 42.
    (2013). Informed Consent, Big Data, and the Oxymoron of Research That Is Not Research. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 40-42. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.768864.
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  22.  45
    Informed Consent, Disclosure, and Understanding.Tom Dougherty - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (2):119-150.
  23. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Informed Consent Without Assessment?Toni C. Saad, Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):1-2.
    Florence Ashley has argued that requiring patients with gender dysphoria to undergo an assessment and referral from a mental health professional before undergoing hormone replacement therapy is unethical and may represent an unconscious hostility towards transgender people. We respond, first, by showing that Ashley has conflated the self-reporting of symptoms with self-diagnosis, and that this is not consistent with the standard model of informed consent to medical treatment. Second, we note that the model of informed consent (...)
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  24.  45
    Informed Consent Practices in Nigeria.Emmanuel R. Ezeome & Patricia A. Marshall - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):138-148.
    Most writing on informed consent in Africa highlights different cultural and social attributes that influence informed consent practices, especially in research settings. This review presents a composite picture of informed consent in Nigeria using empirical studies and legal and regulatory prescriptions, as well as clinical experience. It shows that Nigeria, like most other nations in Africa, is a mixture of sociocultural entities, and, notwithstanding the multitude of factors affecting it, informed consent is (...)
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  25.  33
    Informed Consent Out of Context.Sven Ove Hansson - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):149-154.
    Several attempts have been made to transfer the concept of informed consent from medical and research ethics to dealing with affected groups in other areas such as engineering, land use planning, and business management. It is argued that these attempts are unsuccessful since the concept of informed consent is inadequate for situations in which groups of affected persons are dealt with collectively (rather than individually, as in clinical medicine). There are several reasons for this. The affected (...)
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  26.  3
    Electronic Informed Consent in Mobile Applications Research.John T. Wilbanks - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1_suppl):147-153.
    The article covers electronic informed consent from different dimensions so that practitioners might understand the history, regulation, and current status of eIC. It covers the transition of informed consent to electronic screens and the implications of that transition in terms of design, costs, and data analysis. The article explores the limits of regulation mandating eIC for mobile application research, and addresses some of the broader social context around eIC.
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  27.  23
    Informed Consent for Early-Phase Clinical Trials: Therapeutic Misestimation, Unrealistic Optimism and Appreciation.Jodi Halpern, David Paolo & Andrew Huang - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):384-387.
    Unrealistic therapeutic beliefs are very common—the majority of patient-subjects enrol in phase 1 trials seeking and expecting significant medical benefit, even though the likelihood of such benefit has historically proven very low. The high prevalence of therapeutic misestimation and unrealistic optimism in particular has stimulated debate about whether unrealistic therapeutic beliefs in early-phase clinical trials preclude adequate informed consent. We seek here to help resolve this controversy by showing that a crucial determination of when such therapeutic beliefs are (...)
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  28.  46
    Informed Consent Revisited: Japan and the U.S.Akira Akabayashi & Brian Taylor Slingsby - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):9 – 14.
    Informed consent, decision-making styles and the role of patient-physician relationships are imperative aspects of clinical medicine worldwide. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman afflicted with advanced liver cancer whose attending physician, per request of the family, did not inform her of her true diagnosis. In our analysis, we explore the differences in informed-consent styles between patients who hold an "independent" and "interdependent" construal of the self and then highlight the possible implications maintained by this (...)
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  29.  12
    Informed Consent and Standard of Care: What Must Be Disclosed.Ruth Macklin & Lois Shepherd - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):9-13.
    The Office for Human Research Protections was correct in determining that the consent forms for the National Institutes of Health -sponsored SUPPORT study were seriously flawed. Several articles defended the consent forms and criticized the OHRP's actions. Disagreement focuses on three central issues: how risks and benefits should be described in informed consent documents; the meaning and application of the concept of “standard of care” in the context of research; and the proper role of OHRP. Examination (...)
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  30.  60
    Informed Consent and Research Involving the Newly Dead.Mark R. Wicclair - 2002 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):351-372.
    : This paper examines informed consent in relation to research involving the newly dead. Reasons are presented for facilitating advance decision making in relation to postmortem research, and it is argued that the informed consent of family members should be sought when the deceased have not made a premortem decision. Regardless of whether the dead can be harmed, there are two important respects in which family consent can serve to protect the dead: (1) protecting the (...)
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  31.  39
    Informed Consent Procedures: Responsibilities of Researchers in Developing Countries.Soledad Sanchez, Gloria Salazar, Marcia Tijero & Soledad Diaz - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (5-6):398-412.
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  32.  76
    Understanding Informed Consent for Participation in International Health Research.Ayodele S. Jegede - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):81-87.
    To participate in health research, there is a need for well-administered informed consent. Understanding of informed consent, especially in international health research, is influenced by the participants' understanding of information and the meaning attached to the information communicated to them regarding the purpose and procedure of the research. Incorrect information and the power differential between researcher and participants may lead to participants becoming victims of harmful research procedures. Meningitis epidemics in Kano in early 1996 led to (...)
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  33.  19
    Informed Consent in Ghana: What Do Participants Really Understand?Z. Hill, C. Tawiah-Agyemang, S. Odei-Danso & B. Kirkwood - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):48-53.
    Objectives: To explore how subjects in a placebo-controlled vitamin A supplementation trial among Ghanaian women aged 15–45 years perceive the trial and whether they know that not all trial capsules are the same, and to identify factors associated with this knowledge.Methods: 60 semistructured interviews and 12 focus groups were conducted to explore subjects’ perceptions of the trial. Steps were taken to address areas of low comprehension, including retraining fieldworkers. 1971 trial subjects were randomly selected for a survey measuring their knowledge (...)
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  34.  46
    Informed Consent in Texas: Theory and Practice.Mark J. Cherry & H. Tristram Engelhardt - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):237 – 252.
    The legal basis of informed consent in Texas may on first examination suggest an unqualified affirmation of persons as the source of authority over themselves. This view of individuals in the practice of informed consent tends to present persons outside of any social context in general and outside of their families in particular. The actual functioning of law and medical practice in Texas, however, is far more complex. This study begins with a brief overview of the (...)
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  35.  51
    Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent.Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):343-351.
    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, we argue (...)
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  36.  14
    Informed Consent Is the Essence of Capacity Assessment.Jeffrey P. Spike - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (1):95-105.
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  37.  17
    Informed Consent for HIV Cure Research in South Africa: Issues to Consider.Ciara Staunton - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):3.
    South Africa has made great progress in the development of HIV/AIDS testing, treatment and prevention campaigns. Yet, it is clear that prevention and treatment campaigns alone are not enough to bring this epidemic under control.
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  38.  21
    Informed Consent as an Ethical Requirement in Clinical Trials: An Old, but Still Unresolved Issue. An Observational Study to Evaluate Patient's Informed Consent Comprehension.Virginia Sanchini, Michele Reni, Giliola Calori, Elisabetta Riva & Massimo Reichlin - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):269-275.
    We explored the comprehension of the informed consent in 77 cancer patients previously enrolled in randomised phase II or phase III clinical trials, between March and July 2011, at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milano. We asked participants to complete an ad hoc questionnaire and analysed their answers. Sixty-two per cent of the patients understood the purpose and nature of the trial they were participating in; 44% understood the study procedures and 40% correctly listed at least one (...)
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  39.  7
    Informed Consent and Italian Physicians: Change Course or Abandon Ship—From Formal Authorization to a Culture of Sharing.Emanuela Turillazzi & Margherita Neri - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):449-453.
    In Italy in recent years, an exponential increase in the frequency of medical malpractice claims relating to the issue of informed consent has substantially altered not only medical ethics, but medical practice as well. Total or partial lack of consent has become the cornerstone of many malpractice lawsuits, and continues to be one of the primary cudgels against defendant physicians in Italian courtrooms. Physicians have responded to the rising number of claims with an increase in ‘defensive medicine’ (...)
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  40. Placebo Effects and Informed Consent.Mark Alfano - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):3-12.
    The concepts of placebos and placebo effects refer to extremely diverse phenomena. I recommend dissolving the concepts of placebos and placebo effects into loosely related groups of specific mechanisms, including expectation-fulfillment, classical conditioning, and attentional-somatic feedback loops. If this approach is on the right track, it has three main implications for the ethics of informed consent. First, because of the expectation-fulfillment mechanism, the process of informing cannot be considered independently from the potential effects of treatment. Obtaining informed (...)
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  41.  23
    Informed Consent Should Be Obtained From Patients to Use Products (Skin Substitutes) and Dressings Containing Biological Material.S. Enoch - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):2-6.
    Background: Biological products are widely used in the treatment of burns, chronic wounds, and other forms of acute injury. However, the religious and ethical issues, including consent, arising from their use have never been addressed in the medical literature.Aims: This study was aimed to ascertain the views of religious leaders about the acceptability of biological products and to evaluate awareness among healthcare professionals about their constituents.Methods: The religious groups that make up about 75% of the United Kingdom population were (...)
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  42.  18
    Informed Consent: A Matter of Aspiration Since 1966.Sarah Wieten, Jacob Blythe & David Magnus - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):3-5.
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  43.  63
    Psychotherapy, Placebos, and Informed Consent.Garson Leder - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106453.
    Several authors have recently argued that psychotherapy, as it is commonly practiced, is deceptive and undermines patients’ ability to give informed consent to treatment. This ‘deception’ claim is based on the findings that some, and possibly most, of the ameliorative effects in psychotherapeutic interventions are mediated by therapeutic common factors shared by successful treatments, rather than because of theory-specific techniques. These findings have led to claims that psychotherapy is, at least partly, likely a placebo, and that practitioners of (...)
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  44.  62
    Informed Consent and Fresh Egg Donation for Stem Cell Research: Incorporating Embodied Knowledge Into Ethical Decision-Making.Katherine Carroll & Catherine Waldby - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):29-39.
    This article develops a model of informed consent for fresh oöcyte donation for stem cell research, during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), by building on the importance of patients’ embodied experience. Informed consent typically focuses on the disclosure of material information. Yet this approach does not incorporate the embodied knowledge that patients acquire through lived experience. Drawing on interview data from 35 patients and health professionals in an IVF clinic in Australia, our study demonstrates the uncertainty of (...)
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  45.  52
    Informed Consent and Registry-Based Research - the Case of the Danish Circumcision Registry.Thomas Ploug & Søren Holm - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):53.
    Research into personal health data holds great potential not only for improved treatment but also for economic growth. In these years many countries are developing policies aimed at facilitating such research often under the banner of ‘big data’. A central point of debate is whether the secondary use of health data requires informed consent if the data is anonymised. In 2013 the Danish Minister of Health established a new register collecting data about all ritual male childhood circumcisions in (...)
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  46. Can Informed Consent to Research Be Adapted to Risk?Danielle Bromwich & Annette Rid - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (7):521-528.
    The current ethical and regulatory framework for research is often charged with burdening investigators and impeding socially valuable research. To address these concerns, a growing number of research ethicists argue that informed consent should be adapted to the risks of research participation. This would require less rigorous consent standards in low-risk research than in high-risk research. However, the current discussion is restricted to cases of research in which the risks of research participation are outweighed by the potential (...)
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  47.  19
    Informed Consent in the Psychosis Prodrome: Ethical, Procedural and Cultural Considerations.Sarah E. Morris & Robert K. Heinssen - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:19.
    Research focused on the prodromal period prior to the onset of psychosis is essential for the further development of strategies for early detection, early intervention, and disease pre-emption. Such efforts necessarily require the enrollment of individuals who are at risk of psychosis but have not yet developed a psychotic illness into research and treatment protocols. This work is becoming increasingly internationalized, which warrants special consideration of cultural differences in conceptualization of mental illness and international differences in health care practices and (...)
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  48.  62
    Informed Consent: Good Medicine, Dangerous Side Effects.Bruce N. Waller & Robyn A. Repko - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):66-74.
    Informed consent has passed through three stages. The first paternalistic stage lasted for many centuries: The doctor's diagnosis and healing arts were kept secret, and informing patients was regarded as professionally and ethically wrong. Second came the legal stage, when the right of patients to make informed decisions concerning their own treatment was imposed by the courts and reluctantly tolerated by medical professionals. The third informed consent stage emerged more recently: the general therapy stage. The (...)
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  49.  49
    Informed Consent and Routinisation.Thomas Ploug & Soren Holm - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):214-218.
    This article introduces the notion of ‘routinisation’ into discussions of informed consent. It is argued that the routinisation of informed consent poses a threat to the protection of the personal autonomy of a patient through the negotiation of informed consent. On the basis of a large survey, we provide evidence of the routinisation of informed consent in various types of interaction on the internet; among these, the routinisation of consent to the (...)
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  50.  93
    Can Broad Consent Be Informed Consent?M. Sheehan - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):226-235.
    In biobanks, a broader model of consent is often used and justified by a range of different strategies that make reference to the potential benefits brought by the research it will facilitate combined with the low level of risk involved (provided adequate measures are in place to protect privacy and confidentiality) or a questioning of the centrality of the notion of informed consent. Against this, it has been suggested that the lack of specific information about particular uses (...)
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