Results for 'Informed Consent'

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  1. Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics.Neil C. Manson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Informed consent is a central topic in contemporary biomedical ethics. Yet attempts to set defensible and feasible standards for consenting have led to persistent difficulties. In Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics Neil Manson and Onora O'Neill set debates about informed consent in medicine and research in a fresh light. They show why informed consent cannot be fully specific or fully explicit, and why more specific consent is not always ethically better. They (...)
  2. Improving Understanding in the Research Informed Consent Process: A Systematic Review of 54 Interventions Tested in Randomized Control Trials. [REVIEW]Adam Nishimura, Jantey Carey, Patricia Erwin, Jon Tilburt, M. Murad & Jennifer McCormick - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):28.
    Obtaining informed consent is a cornerstone of biomedical research, yet participants comprehension of presented information is often low. The most effective interventions to improve understanding rates have not been identified.
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  3. Placebo Effects and Informed Consent.Mark Alfano - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):3-12.
    The concepts of placebos and placebo effects refer to extremely diverse phenomena. I recommend dissolving the concepts of placebos and placebo effects into loosely related groups of specific mechanisms, including expectation-fulfillment, classical conditioning, and attentional-somatic feedback loops. If this approach is on the right track, it has three main implications for the ethics of informed consent. First, because of the expectation-fulfillment mechanism, the process of informing cannot be considered independently from the potential effects of treatment. Obtaining informed (...)
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  4.  52
    The Nocebo Effect of Informed Consent.Shlomo Cohen - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (3):147-154.
    The nocebo effect, the mirror-phenomenon to the placebo effect, is when the expectation of a negative outcome precipitates the corresponding symptom or leads to its exacerbation. One of the basic ethical duties in health care is to obtain informed consent from patients before treatment; however, the disclosure of information regarding potential complications or side effects that this involves may precipitate a nocebo effect. While dilemmas between the principles of respect for patient autonomy and of nonmaleficence are recognized in (...)
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  5.  23
    Experiences with Community Engagement and Informed Consent in a Genetic Cohort Study of Severe Childhood Diseases in Kenya.V. M. Marsh, D. M. Kamuya, A. M. Mlamba, T. N. Williams & S. S. Molyneux - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):13-13.
    BackgroundThe potential contribution of community engagement to addressing ethical challenges for international biomedical research is well described, but there is relatively little documented experience of community engagement to inform its development in practice. This paper draws on experiences around community engagement and informed consent during a genetic cohort study in Kenya to contribute to understanding the strengths and challenges of community engagement in supporting ethical research practice, focusing on issues of communication, the role of field workers in 'doing (...)
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  6.  55
    Informed Consent Instead of Assent is Appropriate in Children From the Age of Twelve: Policy Implications of New Findings on Children’s Competence to Consent to Clinical Research.Irma M. Hein, Martine C. De Vries, Pieter W. Troost, Gerben Meynen, Johannes B. Van Goudoever & Ramón J. L. Lindauer - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundFor many decades, the debate on children’s competence to give informed consent in medical settings concentrated on ethical and legal aspects, with little empirical underpinnings. Recently, data from empirical research became available to advance the discussion. It was shown that children’s competence to consent to clinical research could be accurately assessed by the modified MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research. Age limits for children to be deemed competent to decide on research participation have been studied: generally (...)
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  7. The Placebo Phenomenon and Medical Ethics: Rethinking the Relationship Between Informed Consent and Risk–Benefit Assessment.Franklin G. Miller & Luana Colloca - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):229-243.
    It has been presumed within bioethics that the benefits and risks of treatments can be assessed independently of information disclosure to patients as part of the informed consent process. Research on placebo and nocebo effects indicates that this is not true for symptomatic treatments. The benefits and risks that patients experience from symptomatic treatments can be shaped powerfully by information about these treatments provided by clinicians. In this paper we discuss the implications of placebo and nocebo research for (...)
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  8. Heroin Addiction and Voluntary Choice: The Case of Informed Consent.Edmund Henden - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (7):395-401.
    Does addiction to heroin undermine the voluntariness of heroin addicts' consent to take part in research which involves giving them free and legal heroin? This question has been raised in connection with research into the effectiveness of heroin prescription as a way of treating dependent heroin users. Participants in such research are required to give their informed consent to take part. Louis C. Charland has argued that we should not presume that heroin addicts are competent to do (...)
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  9.  13
    The Challenges of Research Informed Consent in Socio‐Economically Vulnerable Populations: A Viewpoint From the Democratic Republic of Congo.Marion Kalabuanga, Raffaella Ravinetto, Vivi Maketa, Hypolite Muhindo Mavoko, Blaise Fungula, Raquel Inocêncio da Luz, Jean‐Pierre Van Geertruyden & Pascal Lutumba - 2016 - Developing World Bioethics 16 (2):64-69.
    In medical research, the ethical principle of respect for persons is operationalized into the process of informed consent. The consent tools should be contextualized and adapted to the different socio-cultural environment, especially when research crosses the traditional boundaries and reaches poor communities. We look at the challenges experienced in the malaria Quinact trial, conducted in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and describe some lessons learned, related to the definition of acceptable representative, the role of independent witness and (...)
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  10.  39
    Voluntary Participation and Comprehension of Informed Consent in a Genetic Epidemiological Study of Breast Cancer in Nigeria.Patricia A. Marshall, Clement A. Adebamowo, Adebowale A. Adeyemo, Temidayo O. Ogundiran, Teri Strenski, Jie Zhou & Charles N. Rotimi - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):38.
    Studies on informed consent to medical research conducted in low or middle-income settings have increased, including empirical investigations of consent to genetic research. We investigated voluntary participation and comprehension of informed consent among women involved in a genetic epidemiological study on breast cancer in an urban setting of Nigeria comparing women in the case and control groups.
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  11.  32
    Informed Consent in Implantable BCI Research: Identifying Risks and Exploring Meaning.Eran Klein - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1299-1317.
    Implantable brain–computer interface technology is an expanding area of engineering research now moving into clinical application. Ensuring meaningful informed consent in implantable BCI research is an ethical imperative. The emerging and rapidly evolving nature of implantable BCI research makes identification of risks, a critical component of informed consent, a challenge. In this paper, 6 core risk domains relevant to implantable BCI research are identified—short and long term safety, cognitive and communicative impairment, inappropriate expectations, involuntariness, affective impairment, (...)
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  12.  42
    The Meta‐Nudge – A Response to the Claim That the Use of Nudges During the Informed Consent Process is Unavoidable.Scott D. Gelfand - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (8):601-608.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, in Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, assert that rejecting the use nudges is ‘pointless’ because ‘[i]n many cases, some kind of nudge is inevitable’. Schlomo Cohen makes a similar claim. He asserts that in certain situations surgeons cannot avoid nudging patients either toward or away from consenting to surgical interventions. Cohen concludes that in these situations, nudging patients toward consenting to surgical interventions is uncriticizable or morally permissible. I call this argument: The (...)
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  13.  21
    Should Non-Invasiveness Change Informed Consent Procedures for Prenatal Diagnosis?Zuzana Deans & Ainsley J. Newson - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (2):122-132.
    Empirical evidence suggests that some health professionals believe consent procedures for the emerging technology of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) should become less rigorous than those currently used for invasive prenatal testing. In this paper, we consider the importance of informed consent and informed choice procedures for protecting autonomy in those prenatal tests which will give rise to a definitive result. We consider whether there is anything special about NIPD that could sanction a change to consent (...)
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  14.  18
    Informed Consent Practices for Surgical Care at University Teaching Hospitals: A Case in a Low Resource Setting.Joseph Ochieng, Charles Ibingira, William Buwembo, Ian Munabi, Haruna Kiryowa, David Kitara, Paul Bukuluki, Gabriel Nzarubara & Erisa Mwaka - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):40.
    Informed consent in medical practice is essential and a global standard that should be sought at all the times doctors interact with patients. Its intensity would vary depending on the invasiveness and risks associated with the anticipated treatment. To our knowledge there has not been any systematic review of consent practices to document best practices and identify areas that need improvement in our setting. The objective of the study was to evaluate the informed consent practices (...)
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  15.  40
    Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Mistaken Association? [REVIEW]Sigurdur Kristinsson - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):253-264.
    For decades, the greater part of efforts to improve regulatory frameworks for research ethics has focused on informed consent procedures; their design, codification and regulation. Why is informed consent thought to be so important? Since the publication of the Belmont Report in 1979, the standard response has been that obtaining informed consent is a way of treating individuals as autonomous agents. Despite its political success, the philosophical validity of this Belmont view cannot be taken (...)
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  16.  19
    A Qualitative Study Using Traditional Community Assemblies to Investigate Community Perspectives on Informed Consent and Research Participation in Western Kenya.Rachel Vreeman, Eunice Kamaara, Allan Kamanda, David Ayuku, Winstone Nyandiko, Lukoye Atwoli, Samuel Ayaya, Peter Gisore, Michael Scanlon & Paula Braitstein - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):23-.
    Background International collaborators face challenges in the design and implementation of ethical biomedical research. Evaluating community understanding of research and processes like informed consent may enable researchers to better protect research participants in a particular setting; however, there exist few studies examining community perspectives in health research, particularly in resource-limited settings, or strategies for engaging the community in research processes. Our goal was to inform ethical research practice in a biomedical research setting in western Kenya and similar resource-limited (...)
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  17.  28
    Should We Nudge Informed Consent?Thom Brooks - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):22-23.
    Exploring the use of nudges and informed consent in medical ethics.
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  18.  21
    Patients' Perceived Purpose of Clinical Informed Consent: Mill's Individual Autonomy Model is Preferred.Muhammad M. Hammami, Eman A. Al-Gaai, Yussuf Al-Jawarneh, Hala Amer, Muhammad B. Hammami, Abdullah Eissa & Mohammad A. Qadire - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):2.
    Although informed consent is an integral part of clinical practice, its current doctrine remains mostly a matter of law and mainstream ethics rather than empirical research. There are scarce empirical data on patients’ perceived purpose of informed consent, which may include administrative routine/courtesy gesture, simple honest permission, informed permission, patient-clinician shared decision-making, and enabling patient’s self decision-making. Different purposes require different processes.
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  19.  42
    Informed Consent Practices in Nigeria.Emmanuel R. Ezeome & Patricia A. Marshall - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):138-148.
    Most writing on informed consent in Africa highlights different cultural and social attributes that influence informed consent practices, especially in research settings. This review presents a composite picture of informed consent in Nigeria using empirical studies and legal and regulatory prescriptions, as well as clinical experience. It shows that Nigeria, like most other nations in Africa, is a mixture of sociocultural entities, and, notwithstanding the multitude of factors affecting it, informed consent is (...)
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  20.  16
    Zum Verbesserungspotenzial Schriftlicher Aufklärungsmaterialien Zu Medizinischen Forschungsvorhaben – Empirische Analyse von Antragsunterlagen Einer ForschungsethikkommissionImproving the Quality of Written Informed Consent Documents for Medical Research—Empirical Analysis of Research Ethics Committee’s Application Documents.Angelika Hüppe, Katharina Dziubek & Heiner Raspe - 2014 - Ethik in der Medizin 26 (3):211-224.
    Zu den elementaren Rechtfertigungsbedingungen der medizinischen Forschung an und mit Menschen zählt die informierte Einwilligungserklärung („informed consent“) des Probanden/Patienten. Für die Gewährleistung eines „informed consent“ sind dem potenziellen Studienteilnehmer u. a. qualitativ hochwertige schriftliche Aufklärungsmaterialien zur Verfügung zu stellen. Wir entwickelten eine Liste von Prüfpunkten, um mit ihnen die Qualität schriftlicher Aufklärungsmaterialien zu bestimmen und zu bewerten. Mithilfe eines Kriterienkataloges bestehend aus über 100 Prüfpunkten wurde die Qualität von 128 zufällig ausgewählten schriftlichen Aufklärungsmaterialien zu Forschungsvorhaben beurteilt, (...)
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  21.  26
    What Do Our Patients Understand About Their Trial Participation? Assessing Patients' Understanding of Their Informed Consent Consultation About Randomised Clinical Trials.C. Behrendt, T. Gölz, C. Roesler, H. Bertz & A. Wünsch - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):74-80.
    Background Ethically, informed consent regarding randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should be understandable to patients. The patients can then give free consent or decline to participate in a RCT. Little is known about what patients really understand in consultations about RCTs. Methods Cancer patients who were asked to participate in a randomised trial were surveyed using a semi-standardised interview developed by the authors. The interview addresses understanding, satisfaction and needs of the patients. The sample included eight patients who (...)
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  22.  69
    Understanding Informed Consent for Participation in International Health Research.Ayodele S. Jegede - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):81-87.
    To participate in health research, there is a need for well-administered informed consent. Understanding of informed consent, especially in international health research, is influenced by the participants' understanding of information and the meaning attached to the information communicated to them regarding the purpose and procedure of the research. Incorrect information and the power differential between researcher and participants may lead to participants becoming victims of harmful research procedures. Meningitis epidemics in Kano in early 1996 led to (...)
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  23.  70
    Personal Autonomy and Informed Consent.Lars Øystein Ursin - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):17-24.
    Two ways of understanding the notion of autonomy are outlined and discussed in this article, in order to clarify how and if informed consent requirements in biotechnological research are to be justified by the promotion of personal autonomy: A proceduralist conception linking autonomy with authenticity, and a substantivist conception linking autonomy with control. The importance of distinguishing autonomy from liberty is emphasised, which opens for a possible conflict between respecting the freedom and the autonomy of research participants. It (...)
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  24.  31
    Electroconvulsive Therapy, the Placebo Effect and Informed Consent.C. R. Blease - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):166-170.
    Major depressive disorder is not only the most widespread mental disorder in the world, it is a disorder on the rise. In cases of particularly severe forms of depression, when all other treatment options have failed, the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a recommended treatment option for patients. ECT has been in use in psychiatric practice for over 70 years and is now undergoing something of a restricted renaissance following a sharp decline in its use in the 1970s. Despite (...)
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  25.  17
    Relevant Information and Informed Consent in Research: In Defense of the Subjective Standard of Disclosure.Vilius Dranseika, Jan Piasecki & Marcin Waligora - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):215-225.
    In this article, we seek to contribute to the debate on the requirement of disclosure in the context of informed consent for research. We defend the subjective standard of disclosure and describe ways to implement this standard in research practice. We claim that the researcher should make an effort to find out what kinds of information are likely to be relevant for those consenting to research. This invites researchers to take empirical survey information seriously, attempt to understand the (...)
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  26.  30
    Informed Consent Out of Context.Sven Ove Hansson - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):149-154.
    Several attempts have been made to transfer the concept of informed consent from medical and research ethics to dealing with affected groups in other areas such as engineering, land use planning, and business management. It is argued that these attempts are unsuccessful since the concept of informed consent is inadequate for situations in which groups of affected persons are dealt with collectively (rather than individually, as in clinical medicine). There are several reasons for this. The affected (...)
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  27.  6
    Motivating Donors to Genetic Research? Anthropological Reasons to Rethink the Role of Informed Consent.Klaus Hoeyer & Niels Lynöe - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):13-23.
    In this article we explore the contribution from social anthropology to the medical ethical debates about the use of informed consent in research, based on blood samples and other forms of tissue. The article springs from a project exploring donors’ motivation for providing blood and healthcare data for genetic research to be executed by a Swedish start-up genomics company. This article is not confined to empirical findings, however, as we suggest that anthropology provides reason to reassess the theoretical (...)
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  28.  72
    Risk Communication and Informed Consent in the Medical Tourism Industry: A Thematic Content Analysis of Canadian Broker Websites. [REVIEW]Kali Penney, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):17-.
    Background: Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing (...)
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  29.  21
    Understanding and Retention of the Informed Consent Process Among Parents in Rural Northern Ghana.Abraham R. Oduro, Raymond A. Aborigo, Dickson Amugsi, Francis Anto, Thomas Anyorigiya, Frank Atuguba, Abraham Hodgson & Kwadwo A. Koram - 2008 - BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):12-.
    The individual informed consent model remains critical to the ethical conduct and regulation of research involving human beings. Parental informed consent process in a rural setting of northern Ghana was studied to describe comprehension and retention among parents as part of the evaluation of the existing informed consent process.
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  30.  38
    Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent.Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):343-351.
    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, we argue (...)
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  31.  37
    The Adequacy of Informed Consent Forms in Genetic Research in Oman: A Pilot Study.Asya Al-Riyami, Deepali Jaju, Sanjay Jaju & Henry J. Silverman - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):57-62.
    Genetic research presents ethical challenges to the achievement of valid informed consent, especially in developing countries with areas of low literacy. During the last several years, a number of genetic research proposals involving Omani nationals were submitted to the Department of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Oman.The objective of this paper is to report on the results of an internal quality assurance initiative to determine the extent of the information being provided in genetic research informed (...) forms. In order to achieve this, we developed checklists to assess the inclusion of basic elements of informed consent as well as elements related to the collection and future storage of biological samples. Three of the authors independently evaluated and reached consensus on seven informed consent forms that were available for review.Of the seven consent forms, four had less than half of the basic elements of informed consent. None contained any information regarding whether genetic information relevant to health would be disclosed, whether participants may share in commercial products, the extent of confidentiality protections, and the inclusion of additional consent forms for future storage and use of tissue samples. Information regarding genetic risks and withdrawal of samples were rarely mentioned (1/7), whereas limits on future use of samples were mentioned in 3 of 7 consent forms.Ultimately, consent forms are not likely to address key issues regarding genetic research that have been recommended by research ethics guidelines. We recommend enhanced educational efforts to increase awareness, on the part of researchers, of information that should be included in consent forms. (shrink)
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  32.  19
    Rethinking Informed Consent in Research on Heroin‐Assisted Treatment.Susanne Uusitalo & Barbara Broers - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (7):462-469.
    Can heroin addicts give consent to research on trials in which heroin is prescribed to them? Analyses of addicts and informed consent have been objects of debate in several articles. Informed consent requires the agent not only to be competent but also to give consent voluntarily. This has been questioned because of alleged features of heroin addiction. Until recently the discussion has focused on heroin addicts' desires for heroin, whether these are irresistible and thus (...)
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  33.  10
    Impfungen in der Pädiatrie Und der „Informed Consent”– Balanceakt Zwischen Sozialpaternalismus Und AutonomieVaccination in Pediatrics and Informed Consent: Balancing Social Paternalism and Patients’ Autonomy.Matthias Dahl - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (3):201-214.
    Definition of the problem: In the field of vaccination in pediatrics, the interests of children, parents and the public health authorities have to be taken into consideration. Arguments: An ethical discussion exclusively in the context of informed consent is not sufficient. Vaccinations as a social duty can be legitimated under certain conditions, e. g., if the well-being of the child is in danger. However, a general duty to vaccinate cannot be justified. Empirical studies have demonstrated that non-vaccinators do (...)
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  34.  54
    Informed Consent and Fresh Egg Donation for Stem Cell Research.Katherine Carroll & Catherine Waldby - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):29-39.
    This article develops a model of informed consent for fresh oöcyte donation for stem cell research, during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), by building on the importance of patients’ embodied experience. Informed consent typically focuses on the disclosure of material information. Yet this approach does not incorporate the embodied knowledge that patients acquire through lived experience. Drawing on interview data from 35 patients and health professionals in an IVF clinic in Australia, our study demonstrates the uncertainty of (...)
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  35.  83
    Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW]Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno - 1994 - HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received (...)
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  36. Understanding the Relationship Between Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Response to Taylor.Lucie White - 2013 - Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):483-491.
    Medical ethicists conventionally assume that the requirement to employ informed consent procedures is grounded in autonomy. It seems intuitively plausible that providing information to an agent promotes his autonomy by better allowing him to steer his life. However, James Taylor questions this view, arguing that any notion of autonomy that grounds a requirement to inform agents turns out to be unrealistic and self-defeating. Taylor thus contends that we are mistaken about the real theoretical grounds for informed (...) procedures. Through analysing Taylor's arguments and showing that they do not stand up to scrutiny, it is possible to defend the view that autonomy is a plausible theoretical basis for informed consent, and to enhance our understanding of the relationship between autonomy and informed consent. (shrink)
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  37.  27
    Attitude Towards Informed Consent Practice in a Developing Country: A Community-Based Assessment of the Role of Educational Status.Kenneth A. Agu, Emmanuel I. Obi, Boniface I. Eze & Wilfred O. Okenwa - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):77.
    It has been reported by some studies that the desire to be involved in decisions concerning one’s healthcare especially with regard to obtaining informed consent is related to educational status. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to assess the influence of educational status on attitude towards informed consent practice in three south-eastern Nigerian communities.
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  38.  11
    Pharmaceutical Information Systems and Possible Implementations of Informed Consent - Developing an Heuristic.Thomas Ploug & Søren Holm - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):30-.
    Background Denmark has implemented a comprehensive, nationwide pharmaceutical information system, and this system has been evaluated by the Danish Council of Ethics. The system can be seen as an exemplar of a comprehensive health information system for clinical use. Analysis The paper analyses 1) how informed consent can be implemented in the system and how different implementations create different impacts on autonomy and control of information, and 2) arguments directed towards justifying not seeking informed consent in (...)
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  39.  21
    Contemporary Issues Concerning Informed Consent in Japan Based on a Review of Court Decisions and Characteristics of Japanese Culture.Sakiko Masaki, Hiroko Ishimoto & Atsushi Asai - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):8.
    Since Japan adopted the concept of informed consent from the West, its inappropriate acquisition from patients in the Japanese clinical setting has continued, due in part to cultural aspects. Here, we discuss the current status of and contemporary issues surrounding informed consent in Japan, and how these are influenced by Japanese culture.
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  40.  58
    Informed Consent: A Primer for Clinical Practice.Deborah Bowman - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: why focus on informed consent?; 2. Deciding who decides: capacity and consent; 3. Putting the informed into 'informed consent': information and decision-making; 4. Freedom of expression: the voluntary nature of consent; 5. A patient's prerogative? The continuing nature of consent; 6. Concluding words about consent; Index.
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  41.  38
    The New Genetics and Informed Consent: Differentiating Choice to Preserve Autonomy.Eline M. Bunnik, Antina Jong, Niels Nijsingh & Guido M. W. R. Wert - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):348-355.
    The advent of new genetic and genomic technologies may cause friction with the principle of respect for autonomy and demands a rethinking of traditional interpretations of the concept of informed consent. Technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and micro-array based analysis enable genome-wide testing for many heterogeneous abnormalities and predispositions simultaneously. This may challenge the feasibility of providing adequate pre-test information and achieving autonomous decision-making. At a symposium held at the 11th World Congress of Bioethics in June 2012 (Rotterdam), (...)
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  42.  14
    Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.Sara A. S. Dekking, Rieke Van Der Graaf & Johannes J. M. Van Delden - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):440-450.
    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for (...)
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  43.  16
    Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.Sara A. S. Dekking, Rieke Van Der Graaf & Johannes J. M. Van Delden - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (5):440-450.
    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for (...)
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  44.  50
    Argumentation and Informed Consent in the Doctor–Patient Relationship.Jerome Bickenbach - 2012 - Journal of Argumentaion in Context 1 (1):5-18.
    Argumentation theory has much to offer our understanding of the doctor-patient relationship as it plays out in the context of seeking and obtaining consent to treatment. In order to harness the power of argumentation theory in this regard, I argue, it is necessary to take into account insights from the legal and bioethical dimensions of informed consent, and in particular to account for features of the interaction that make it psychologically complex: that there is a fundamental asymmetry (...)
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  45.  74
    The Ethics of Managing Affective and Emotional States to Improve Informed Consent: Autonomy, Comprehension, and Voluntariness.Hillel Braude & Jonathan Kimmelman - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (3):149-156.
    Over the past several decades the ‘affective revolution’ in cognitive psychology has emphasized the critical role affect and emotion play in human decision-making. Drawing on this affective literature, various commentators have recently proposed strategies for managing therapeutic expectation that use contextual, symbolic, or emotive interventions in the consent process to convey information or enhance comprehension. In this paper, we examine whether affective consent interventions that target affect and emotion can be reconciled with widely accepted standards for autonomous action. (...)
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  46.  7
    Informed Consent Im Klinischen Alltag – Eine Pragmatische InterpretationInformed Consent in Clinical Practice: A Pragmatic Interpretation.Rainer Dziewas, Peter Sörös & Henning Henningsen - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (3):151-159.
    Definiton of the problem: The current literature concerning the topic of ”informed consent” confronts physicians with a growing demand for extended and sophisticated disclosure duties. Often enough they hardly seem to be feasible, not least because of an actual lack of personnel and time. The problem is to find a realisable way to balance these theoretical and practical considerations. Arguments: The fundamental idea of the concept presented here consists of using the difficulty of a certain decision as standard (...)
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  47. Informed Consent to HIV Cure Research.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):108-113.
    Trials with highly unfavourable risk–benefit ratios for participants, like HIV cure trials, raise questions about the quality of the consent of research participants. Why, it may be asked, would a person with HIV who is doing well on antiretroviral therapy be willing to jeopardise his health by enrolling in such a trial? We distinguish three concerns: first, how information is communicated to potential participants; second, participants’ motivations for enrolling in potentially high risk research with no prospect of direct benefit; (...)
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  48.  20
    Process for Obtaining Informed Consent: Women’s Opinions.Silvana Ferreira Bento, Ellen Hardy & Maria José Duarte Osis - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):197-206.
    In Brazil, every study involving human beings is required to produce an informed consent form that must be signed by study participants: this is stated in Resolution 196/96. 1 Consent must be obtained through a specific structured process. Objective: To present the opinions of women regarding how the process of obtaining informed consent should be conducted when women are invited to participate in studies on contraceptive methods. Subjects and Methods: Eight focus groups were conducted, involving (...)
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  49.  19
    Arguing 'For' the Patient: Informed Consent and Strategic Maneuvering in Doctor–Patient Interaction. [REVIEW]Peter J. Schulz & Sara Rubinelli - 2008 - Argumentation 22 (3):423-432.
    As a way to advance integration between traditional readings of the medical encounter and argumentation theory, this article conceptualizes the doctor–patient interaction as a form of info-suasive dialogue. Firstly, the article explores the relevance of argumentation in the medical encounter in connection with the process of informed consent. Secondly, it discloses the risks inherent to a lack of reconciliation of the dialectical and rhetorical components in the delivery of the doctor’s advice, as especially resulting from the less than (...)
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  50.  15
    Erratum To: Arguing ‘for’ the Patient: Informed Consent and Strategic Maneuvering in Doctor–Patient Interaction.Peter J. Schulz & Sara Rubinelli - 2015 - Argumentation 29 (4):481-491.
    As a way to advance integration between traditional readings of the medical encounter and argumentation theory, this article conceptualizes the doctor–patient interaction as a form of info-suasive dialogue. Firstly, the article explores the relevance of argumentation in the medical encounter in connection with the process of informed consent. Secondly, it discloses the risks inherent to a lack of reconciliation of the dialectical and rhetorical components in the delivery of the doctor’s advice, as especially resulting from the less-than-ideal conditions (...)
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