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  1.  27
    An Intercultural Nursing Perspective on Autonomy.Ingrid Hanssen - 2004 - Nursing Ethics 11 (1):28-41.
    This article is based on an empirical study regarding ethical challenges in intercultural nursing. The focus is on autonomy and disclosure. Autonomy is a human capacity that has become an important ethical principle in nursing. Although the relationship between autonomy and patients’ possibly harmful choices is discussed, the focus is on ‘forced’ autonomy. Nurses seem to equate respect with autonomy; it seems to be hard to cope with the fact that there are patients who voluntarily undergo treatment but who actively (...)
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  2.  14
    From Human Ability to Ethical Principle: An Intercultural Perspective on Autonomy.Ingrid Hanssen - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):269-279.
    Based on an empirical study regarding ethical challenges within intercultural health care, the focus of this article is upon autonomy and disclosure, discussed in light of philosophy and anthropology. What are the consequences for patients if the patients’ right to be autonomous and to participate in treatment and care decisions by health care workers is interpreted as an obligation to participate? To force a person to make independent choices who is socio-culturally unprepared to do so, may violate his/her integrity. This (...)
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  3.  16
    Utilitarian and Common-Sense Morality Discussions in Intercultural Nursing Practice.Ingrid Hanssen & Lise-Merete Alpers - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):201-211.
    Two areas of ethical conflict in intercultural nursing — who needs single rooms more, and how far should nurses go to comply with ethnic minority patients’ wishes? — are discussed from a utilitarian and common-sense morality point of view. These theories may mirror nurses’ way of thinking better than principled ethics, and both philosophies play a significant role in shaping nurses’ decision making. Questions concerning room allocation, noisy behaviour, and demands that nurses are unprepared or unequipped for may be hard (...)
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