54 found
Order:
See also
  1. Beyond Informed Consent: The Therapeutic Misconception and Trust.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & A. Ho - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):202-205.
    The therapeutic misconception has been seen as presenting an ethical problem because failure to distinguish the aims of research participation from those receiving ordinary treatment may seriously undermine the informed consent of research subjects. Hence, most theoretical and empirical work on the problems of the therapeutic misconception has been directed to evaluate whether, and to what degree, this confusion invalidates the consent of subjects. We argue here that this focus on the understanding component of informed consent, while important, might be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  2.  39
    Are There Limits to Scientists' Obligations to Seek and Engage Dissenters?Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2014 - Synthese 191 (12):2751-2765.
    Dissent is thought to play a valuable role in science, so that scientific communities ought to create opportunities for receiving critical feedback and take dissenting views seriously. There is concern, however, that some dissent does more harm than good. Dissent on climate change and evolutionary theory, for example, has confused the public, created doubt about existing consensus, derailed public policy, and forced scientists to devote resources to respond. Are there limits to the extent to which scientific communities have obligations to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  80
    Social Values and Scientific Evidence: The Case of the HPV Vaccines.Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (2):203-213.
    Several have argued that the aims of scientific research are not always independent of social and ethical values. Yet this is often assumed only to have implications for decisions about what is studied, or which research projects are funded, and not for methodological decisions or standards of evidence. Using the case of the recently developed HPV vaccines, we argue that the social aims of research can also play important roles in justifying decisions about (1) how research problems are defined in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4.  33
    Defending Human Enhancement Technologies: Unveiling Normativity.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):483-487.
    Recent advances in biotechnologies have led to speculations about enhancing human beings. Many of the moral arguments presented to defend human enhancement technologies have been limited to discussions of their risks and benefits. The author argues that in so far as ethical arguments focus primarily on risks and benefits of human enhancement technologies, these arguments will be insufficient to provide a robust defence of these technologies. This is so because the belief that an assessment of risks and benefits is a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  5.  11
    A Duty to Participate in Research: Does Social Context Matter?Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):28-36.
    Because of the important benefits that biomedical research offers to humans, some have argued that people have a general moral obligation to participate in research. Although the defense of such a putative moral duty has raised controversy, few scholars, on either side of the debate, have attended to the social context in which research takes place and where such an obligation will be discharged. By reflecting on the social context in which a presumed duty to participate in research will obtain, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  6.  18
    Moral Bioenhancement: Much Ado About Nothing?Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Arleen Salles - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (4):223-232.
  7.  73
    Addressing Problems in Profit-Driven Research: How Can Feminist Conceptions of Objectivity Help?Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (2):135-151.
    Although there is increased recognition of the inevitable--and perhaps sometimes beneficial-- role of values in scientific inquiry, there are also growing concerns about the potential for commercial values to lead to bias. This is particularly evident in biomedical research. There is a concern that conflicts of interest created by commercialization may lead to biased reasoning or methodological choices in testing drugs and medical interventions. In addition, such interests may lead research in directions that are unresponsive to pressing social needs, when (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. How Do Disclosure Policies Fail? Let Us Count the Ways.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2009 - FASEB Journal 23 (6):1638-42.
  9.  43
    Interpreting Evidence: Why Values Can Matter As Much As Science.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Kristen Intemann - 2012 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (1):59-70.
    Despite increasing recognition of the ways in which ethical and social values play a role in science (Kitcher 2001; Longino 1990, 2002), scientists are often still reluctant to acknowledge or discuss ethical and social values at stake in their research. Even when research is closely connected to developing public policy, it is generally held that it should be empirical data, and not the values of scientists, that inform policy. According to this view, scientists need not, and should not, endorse non-epistemic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10. Biological Explanations and Social Responsibility.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):345-358.
    The aim of this paper is to show that critics of biological explanations of human nature may be granting too much to those who propose such explanations when they argue that the truth of genetic determinism implies an end to critical evaluation and reform of our social institutions. This is the case because when we argue that biological determinism exempts us from social critique we are erroneously presupposing that our social values, practices, and institutions have nothing to do with what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  77
    Creating Reflective Spaces: Interactions Between Philosophers and Biomedical Scientists.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2009 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (1):39-47.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12. Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technology—preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  32
    When the Milk of Human Kindness Becomes a Luxury (and Untested) Good. A Reply to Harris’ Unconditional Embrace of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    A new reprogenetic technology, mitochondrial replacement, is making its appearance and, unsurprisingly given its promise to wash off our earthly stains --or at least the scourges of sexual reproduction--, John Harris finds only reasons to celebrate this new scientific feat.1 In fact, he finds mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) so “unreservedly welcome” that he believes those who reject them suffer from “a large degree of desperation and not a little callousness.”2 Believing myself to be neither desperate nor callous, but finding myself (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  21
    Human Dignity, Transhuman Dignity, and All That Jazz.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):53-55.
  15. Scientific Dissent and Public Policy. Is Targeting Dissent a Reasonable Way to Protect Sound Policy Decisions?Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Kristen Intemann - 2013 - EMBO Reports 14 (4):231-35.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  62
    On Our Obligation to Select the Best Children: A Reply to Savulescu.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (1):72–83.
  17. Viewpoint: Developing a Research Ethics Consultation Service to Foster Responsive and Responsible Clinical Research.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin, Li Palmer & Jj Fins - 2007 - Academic Medicine 82 (9):900-4.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  18.  56
    Chimeras and Human Dignity.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (4):pp. 331-346.
    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19. Regulating Scientific Research: Should Scientists Be Left Alone?Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2008 - FASEB Journal 22 (3):654-58.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  25
    Disgust in Bioethics.Arleen Salles & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (02):267-280.
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  29
    An Undignified Bioethics: There is No Method in This Madness.Inmaculada de Melo-martín - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (4):224-230.
    In a recent article, Alasdair Cochrane argues for the need to have an undignified bioethics. His is not, of course, a call to transform bioethics into an inelegant, pathetic discipline, or one failing to meet appropriate disciplinary standards. His is a call to simply eliminate the concept of human dignity from bioethical discourse. Here I argue that he fails to make his case. I first show that several of the flaws that Cochrane identifies are not flaws of the conceptions of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  34
    Human Dignity in International Policy Documents: A Useful Criterion for Public Policy?Inmaculada de Melo-martín - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (1):37-45.
    Current developments in biomedicine are presenting us with difficult ethical decisions and raising complex policy questions about how to regulate these new developments. Particularly vexing for governments have been issues related to human embryo experimentation. Because some of the most promising biomedical developments, such as stem cell research and nuclear somatic transfer, involve such experimentation, several international bodies have drafted documents aimed to provide guidance to governments when developing biomedical science policy. Here I focus on two such documents: the Council (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  6
    Should Professional Associations Sanction Conscientious Refusals?Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):23 – 24.
  24.  41
    On Cloning Human Beings.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (3):246–265.
  25.  5
    More Clarifications: On the Goals of Conflict of Interest Policies.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):35-37.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Beyond Risk. A More Realistic Risk-Benefit Analysis of Agricultural Biotechnologies.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Z. Meghani - 2008 - EMBO Reports 9 (4):302-06.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Can Ethical Reasoning Contribute to Better Epidemiology? A Case Study in Research on Racial Health Disparities.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Kristen Intemann - 2007 - European Journal of Epidemiology 22 (4):215-21.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  22
    Firing Up the Nature/Nurture Controversy: Bioethics and Genetic Determinism.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (9):526-530.
    It is argued here that bioethicists might inadvertently be promoting genetic determinism: the idea that genes alone determine human traits and behaviours. Discussions about genetic testing are used to exemplify how they might be doing so. Quite often bioethicists use clinical cases to support particular moral obligations or rights as if these cases were representative of the kind of information we can acquire about human diseases through genetic testing, when they are not. On other occasions, the clinical cases are presented (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  9
    Strangers No More: Genuine Interdisciplinarity.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Joseph J. Fins - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):16 – 17.
  30.  4
    Ethics, Embryos, and Eggs: The Need for More Than Epistemic Values.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):38-40.
  31.  16
    Furthering Injustices Against Women: Genetic Information, Moral Obligations, and Gender.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (6):301–307.
  32.  23
    Who's Afraid of Dissent?: Addressing Concerns About Undermining Scientific Consensus in Public Policy Developments.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Kristen Intemann - 2014 - Perspectives on Science 22 (4):593-615.
    Many have argued that allowing and encouraging public avenues for dissent and critical evaluation of scientific research is a necessary condition for promoting the objectivity of scientific communities and advancing scientific knowledge . The history of science reveals many cases where an existing scientific consensus was later shown to be wrong . Dissent plays a crucial role in uncovering potential problems and limitations of consensus views. Thus, many have argued that scientific communities ought to increase opportunities for dissenting views to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  49
    Genetic Testing: The Appropriate Means for a Desired Goal? [REVIEW]Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):167-177.
    Scientists, the medical profession, philosophers, social scientists, policy makers, and the public at large have been quick to embrace the accomplishments of genetic science. The enthusiasm for the new biotechnologies is not unrelated to their worthy goal. The belief that the new genetic technologies will help to decrease human suffering by improving the public’s health has been a significant influence in the acceptance of technologies such as genetic testing and screening. But accepting this end should not blind us to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  25
    Assisted Reproductive Technology in Spain: Considering Women's Interests.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (3):228.
    It might come as a surprise to many that Spain, a country with a strong Catholic tradition that officially banned contraceptive technologies until 1978, has some of the most liberal regulations in assisted reproduction in the world. Law No. 35/1988 was one of the first and most detailed acts of legislation undertaken on the subject of assisted-conception procedures. Indeed, not only did the law permit research on nonviable embryos, it made assisted reproductive technologies available to any woman, whether married or (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  11
    By Author.David M. Craig, Robert I. Field, Ar Caplan, John P. Gluck, Mark T. Holdsworth, Bert Gordijn, L. Norbert, Henk A. M. J. ten Have, Norbert L. Steinkamp & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (4):405-407.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  18
    A Parental Duty to Use PGD: More Than We Bargained For?Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):14-15.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 4, Page 14-15, April 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  8
    Biotechnology. Tweaking Here, Tuning There. Is That All We Need?Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2006 - Philosophy Now 56:35-37.
  38.  18
    On Disgust and Human Dignity.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Arleen Salles - 2011 - Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (2):159-168.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. The Ethics of Anonymous Gamete Donation: Is There a Right to Know One's Genetic Origins?Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (2).
    A growing number of jurisdictions hold that gamete donors must be identifiable to the children born with their eggs or sperm, on grounds that being able to know about one's genetic origins is a fundamental moral right. But the argument for that belief has not yet been adequately made.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  12
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für Philosophie Hannover, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  9
    Through a Glass, Darkly.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2012 - Metascience 21 (2):367-370.
    Through a glass, darkly Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9633-2 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College—Cornell University, 402 E. 67th Street, New York, NY 10065, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  2
    Book Symposium on Human Nature in an Age of Biotechnology: The Case for Mediated Posthumanism By Tamar Sharon Springer, Dordrecht, 2014.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Michael Hauskeller, Sandra Braman, Xavier Guchet & Tamar Sharon - 2015 - Philosophy and Technology 28 (4):581-599.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  5
    Patenting and the Gender Gap: Should Women Be Encouraged to Patent More? [REVIEW]Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):491-504.
    The commercialization of academic science has come to be understood as economically desirable for institutions, individual researchers, and the public. Not surprisingly, commercial activity, particularly that which results from patenting, appears to be producing changes in the standards used to evaluate scientists’ performance and contributions. In this context, concerns about a gender gap in patenting activity have arisen and some have argued for the need to encourage women to seek more patents. They believe that because academic advancement is mainly dependent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  6
    Editors' Introduction: Biomedical Technologies.Marin Gillis & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):497-503.
  45. When Ethics Constrains Clinical Research: Trial Design of Control Arms in "Greater Than Minimal Risk" Pediatric Trials.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2011 - Human Gene Therapy 22 (9):1121-27.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    IRBs and The Long-Term Social Implications of Research.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):22-23.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Biological Explanations and Social Responsibility.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (2):345-358.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Ethical Issues in Human Stem Cell Research : Embryos and Beyond.Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Marin Gillis - 2010 - In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Lack of Access to Genetic-Relative Family Health History: A Health Disparity for Adoptees?Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):43-45.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Novel Therapies, High-Risk Pediatric Research, and the Prospect of Benefit: Learning From the Ethical Disagreements.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin, D. Sondhi & Rg Crystal - 2012 - Molecular Therapapy 20 (6):1095-102..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 54