Results for 'Instinct'

620 found
Order:
  1.  64
    The Instinct Concept of the Early Konrad Lorenz.Ingo Brigandt - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):571–608..
    Peculiar to Konrad Lorenz’s view of instinctive behavior is his strong innate-learned dichotomy. He claimed that there are neither ontogenetic nor phylogenetic transitions between instinctive and experience-based behavior components, thus contradicting all former accounts of instinct. The present study discusses how Lorenz came to hold this controversial position by examining the history of Lorenz’s early theoretical development in the crucial period from 1931 to 1937, taking relevant influences into account. Lorenz’s intellectual development is viewed as being guided by four (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  2. Peirce on Intuition, Instinct, and Common Sense.Kenneth Boyd & Diana Heney - 2017 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2).
    In addition to being a founder of American pragmatism, Charles Sanders Peirce was a scientist and an empiricist. A core aspect of his thoroughgoing empiricism was a mindset that treats all attitudes as revisable. His fallibilism seems to require us to constantly seek out new information, and to not be content holding any beliefs uncritically. At the same time, Peirce often states that common sense has an important role to play in both scientific and vital inquiry, and that there cannot (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  99
    Jung in Dialogue with Freud and Patañjali: Instinct, Affective Neuroscience, and the Reconciliation of Science and Religious Experience.Leanne Whitney - 2017 - Cosmos and History 13 (2):298-312.
    For both Jung and Patañjali our human desire to understand “God” is as real as any other instinct. Jung’s and Patañjali’s models further align in their emphasis on the teleological directedness of the psyche, and their aim at reconciling science and religious experience. As an atheist, Freud was in disagreement, but all three scholars align in their emphasis on the study of affect as an empirical means of entering into the psyche. For Patañjali, the nadir of affect lays in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  53
    Can Evolutionary Psychology Learn From the Instinct Debate?Simon J. Hampton - 2006 - History of the Human Sciences 19 (4):57-74.
    The concept of instinct espoused in psychology in the early 20th century and the contemporary concept of psychological adaptation invite comparison. Definitions of both employ the notions of inheritance, selection, functional specificity, and species typicality. This article examines how psychologists before the rise of behaviourism sought to establish instinct as a psychological phenomenon. One of the consequences of doing so was a decoupling of psychological and physiological forms of instinct. This led to a failure of constraint in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  84
    Genesis, Instinct, and Reconstruction: Nam-in Lee's Edmund Husserl's Phänomenologie der Instincte. [REVIEW]James G. Hart - 1998 - Husserl Studies 15 (2):101-123.
    Nam-In Lee’s impressive study of “instinct” in Husserl1 gives a new sense to Husserl’s self-description of his work as a preoccupation with beginnings (see p. x) because it seeks not only to integrate the theme of instinct systematically into Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology but to demonstrate that it has a fundamental position. I believe the author has successfully demonstrated his contention that other students of Husserl who have treated the theme of instinct as a marginal consideration failed to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  80
    Marin Cureau de la Chambre on the Natural Cognition of the Vegetative Soul: An Early Modern Theory of Instinct.Markus Wild - 2008 - Vivarium 46 (3):443-461.
    According to Marin Cureau de La Chambre—steering a middleway between the Aristotelian and the Cartesian conception of the soul—everything that lives cognizes and everything that cognizes is alive. Cureau sticks with the general tripart distinction of vegetative, sensitive, and intellectual soul. Each part of the soul has its own cognition. Cognition is the way in which living beings regulate bodily equilibirum and environmental navigation. This regulative activity is gouverned by acquired or by innate images. Natural cognition (or instinct) is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  92
    The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution.Denis Dutton - 2009 - Bloomsbury Press.
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  8.  83
    Beyond the Instinct-Inference Dichotomy: A Unified Interpretation of Peirce's Theory of Abduction.Mousa Mohammadian - 2019 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 55 (2):138-160.
    I examine and resolve an exegetical dichotomy between two main interpretations of Peirce’s theory of abduction, namely, the Generative Interpretation and the Pursuitworthiness Interpretation. According to the former, abduction is the instinctive process of generating explanatory hypotheses through a mental faculty called insight. According to the latter, abduction is a rule-governed procedure for determining the relative pursuitworthiness of available hypotheses and adopting the worthiest one for further investigation—such as empirical tests—based on economic considerations. It is shown that the Generative Interpretation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Musicality: Instinct or Acquired Skill?Gary F. Marcus - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):498-512.
  10.  3
    Aquinas, Instinct and the “Internalist” Justification of Faith.Gregory R. P. Stacey - forthcoming - New Blackfriars.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Against Instinct: From Biology to Philosophical Psychology.Dennis M. SENCHUK - 1991 - Temple University Press.
  12. The Language Instinct.Steven Pinker - 1994/2007 - Harper Perennial.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   404 citations  
  13. Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion.Richard Atkins - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Sanders Peirce is regarded as the founding father of pragmatism and a key figure in the development of American philosophy, yet his practical philosophy remains under-acknowledged and misinterpreted. In this book, Richard Atkins argues that Peirce did in fact have developed and systematic views on ethics, on religion, and on how to live, and that these views are both plausible and relevant. Drawing on a controversial lecture that Peirce delivered in 1898 and related works, he examines Peirce's theories of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution.Denis Dutton - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The need to create art is found in every human society, manifest in many different ways across many different cultures. Is this universal need rooted in our evolutionary past? The Art Instinct reveals that it is, combining evolutionary psychology with aesthetics to shed new light on fascinating questions about the nature of art.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15.  42
    Three Abductive Solutions to the Meno Paradox – with Instinct, Inference, and Distributed Cognition.Sami Paavola & Kai Hakkarainen - 2005 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (3-4):235-253.
    This article analyzes three approaches to resolving the classical Meno paradox, or its variant, the learning paradox, emphasizing Charles S. Peirce’s notion of abduction. Abduction provides a way of dissecting those processes where something new, or conceptually more complex than before, is discovered or learned. In its basic form, abduction is a “weak” form of inference, i.e., it gives only tentative suggestions for further investigation. But it is not too weak if various sources of clues and restrictions on the abductive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  16.  7
    Cudworth on Superintellectual Instinct as Inclination to the Good.David Leech - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (5):954-970.
    Stephen Darwall notes that for Cudworth the fundamental ethical motive is love, but that the Cambridge Platonist tells us little about love’s character, aim and object. In this article I examine Cudworth’s doctrine of ‘superintellectual instinct’ as a natural love for or inclination to the good as it takes shape in two of his unpublished freewill manuscripts. I show that in these manuscripts he assumes a threefold model of how this higher love as a natural or ‘created’ grace fits (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Instinct in the ‘50s: The British Reception of Konrad Lorenz’s Theory of Instinctive Behavior.Paul E. Griffiths - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):609-631.
    At the beginning of the 1950s most students of animal behavior in Britain saw the instinct concept developed by Konrad Lorenz in the 1930s as the central theoretical construct of the new ethology. In the mid 1950s J.B.S. Haldane made substantial efforts to undermine Lorenz''s status as the founder of the new discipline, challenging his priority on key ethological concepts. Haldane was also critical of Lorenz''s sharp distinction between instinctive and learnt behavior. This was inconsistent with Haldane''s account of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18.  63
    The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It.Philip Ball - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Now in The Music Instinct , award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. The Faith Instinct: How Religion Evolved and Why It Endures.Nicholas Wade - 2009 - Penguin Press.
    The nature of religion -- The moral instinct -- The evolution of religious behavior -- Music, dance, and trance -- Ancestral religion -- The transformation -- The tree of religion -- Morality, trade, and trust -- The ecology of religion -- Religion and warfare -- Religion and nation -- The future of religion.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. Natural Instinct, Perceptual Relativity, and Belief in the External World in Hume’s Enquiry.Annemarie Butler - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):115-158.
    In part 1 of Enquiry 12, Hume presents a skeptical argument against belief in external existence. The argument involves a perceptual relativity argument that seems to conclude straightaway the double existence of objects and perceptions, where objects cause and resemble perceptions. In Treatise 1.4.2, Hume claimed that the belief in double existence arises from imaginative invention, not reasoning about perceptual relativity. I dissolve this tension by distinguishing the effects of natural instinct and showing that some ofthese effects supplement the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Art, Sexual Selection, Group Selection (Critical Notice of Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct).Mohan Matthen - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):337-356.
    The capacity to engage with art is a human universal present in all cultures and just about every individual human. This indicates that this capacity is evolved. In this Critical Notice of Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct, I discuss various evolutionary scenarios and their consequences. Dutton and I both reject the "spandrel" approach that originates from the work of Gould and Lewontin. Dutton proposes, following work of Geoffrey Miller, that art is sexually selected--that art-production is a sign of a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  42
    The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution.Denis Dutton - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    The need to create art is found in every human society, manifest in many different ways across many different cultures. Is this universal need rooted in our evolutionary past? The Art Instinct reveals that it is, combining evolutionary psychology with aesthetics to shed new light on fascinating questions about the nature of art.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  46
    Empathy and Instinct: Cognitive Neuroscience and Folk Psychology.Anne Jaap Jacobson - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (5):467-482.
    Might we have an instinctive tendency to perform helpful actions? This paper explores a model under development in cognitive neuroscience that enables us to understand what instinctive, helpful actions might look like. The account that emerges puts some pressure on key concepts in the philosophical understanding of folk psychology. In developing the contrast, a notion of embodied beliefs is introduced; it arguably fits folk conceptions better than philosophical ones. One upshot is that Humean insights into the role of empathy and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  16
    Instinct and Intelligence in British Natural Theology: Some Contributions to Darwin's Theory of the Evolution of Behavior.Robert J. Richards - 1981 - Journal of the History of Biology 14 (2):193-230.
    In late September 1838, Darwin read Malthus's Essay on Population, which left him with “a theory by which to work.”115 Yet he waited some twenty years to publish his discovery in the Origin of Species. Those interested in the fine grain of Darwin's development have been curious about this delay. One recent explanation has his hand stayed by fear of reaction to the materialist implications of linking man with animals. “Darwin sensed,” according to Howard Gruber, “that some would object to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  25.  43
    The Desire to Obtain Money: A Culturally Ritualised Expression of the Aggressive Instinct.Ralf-Peter Behrendt - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):178-179.
    Social behaviour is but an expression of instinctive mechanisms whereby the aggressive instinct is of particular importance, having given rise to most of the complexity of social behaviour through processes of phylogenetic and cultural ritualisation. The role of the aggressive instinct is to dynamically maintain the ranking order in a group, and much of social interaction is concerned with this, including monetary exchange. What is certain, is that with the elimination of aggression, … the tackling of a task (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  81
    Nietzsche on Instinct and Language Ed. By João Constâncio and Maria João Mayer Branco (Review).James Pearson - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):115-117.
    Nietzsche’s critique of the will to truth, and, more specifically, the metaphysical tradition, is inextricable from both his philosophy of language and his turn to physiology. Though the way in which Nietzsche conceived of the intertwinement of language, reason, and the body developed through the course of his philosophical maturation, it is nonetheless a recurrent motif spanning the breadth of his oeuvre. As the editors state in their introduction to Nietzsche on Instinct and Language (NIL), the volume aims at (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Evolutionary Aesthetics: Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution: Bloomsbury Press, New York, 2009.Justine Kingsbury - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):141-150.
    Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct succeeds admirably in showing that it is possible to think about art from a biological point of view, and this is a significant achievement, given that resistance to the idea that cultural phenomena have biological underpinnings remains widespread in many academic disciplines. However, his account of the origins of our artistic impulses and the far-reaching conclusions he draws from that account are not persuasive. This article points out a number of problems: in particular, problems (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  18
    The Teaching Instinct.Cecilia I. Calero, A. P. Goldin & M. Sigman - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (4):819-830.
    Teaching allows human culture to exist and to develop. Despite its significance, it has not been studied in depth by the cognitive neurosciences. Here we propose two hypotheses to boost the claim that teaching is a human instinct, and to expand our understanding of how teaching occurs as a dynamic bi-directional relation within the teacher-learner dyad. First, we explore how children naturally use ostensive communication when teaching; allowing them to be set in the emitter side of natural pedagogy. Then, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Role of Instinct and Assent in Stoic Epistemology.A. Kalas - 2002 - Filozofia 57 (3):163-180.
    The paper deals with the role of assent and instinct in the process of cognition. The author shows, that the Stoic instinct is a dynamic aspect in the processes of cognition, decision making and action, its consequence being at the same time the assent, i. e. the approval of a given descriptive or prescriptive proposition as a true one. Tha paper wants to stress e remarcable rationalistic character of the Stoic epistemology - the only constitutive elemnent of the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  15
    Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion by Richard Kenneth Atkins. [REVIEW]Wilson Aaron - 2017 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 53 (1):146-152.
    The heart of Richard Kenneth Atkins’s Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion is an interpretation and defense of Peirce’s sentimental conservatism, as well as an extension of that idea to Peirce’s philosophy of religion and to the casuistic approach to practical ethics. “A Defense of Peirce’s Sentimental Conservatism” is the explicit title of the second of the book’s six chapters. But the only chapter in which Peirce’s sentimental conservatism does not itself appear (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  51
    The Early Theoretical Development of Konrad Lorenz and the Motivating Factors Behind His Instinct Concept [La Prima Fase Dello Sviluppo Teorico di Konrad Lorenz E I Fattori Motivanti Del Suo Concetto di Istinto].Ingo Brigandt - 2005 - In M. Celentano & M. Stanzione (eds.), Konrad Lorenz cent'anni dopo: L'eredità scientifica del padre dell'etologia. pp. 47–69.
    The present study discusses the early theoretical development of Konrad Lorenz in the period from 1930 to 1937. In this period Lorenz developed his position on instinct in the first place, and thus his theoretical views were subject to change. Despite this change, the paper points to relatively stable features of Lorenz’s approach, which emerged relatively soon in his scientific career and guided his theoretical development in this and beyond this early phase.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  22
    L'Instinct, Réalité Scientifique.Maurice Thomas - 1957 - Acta Biotheoretica 12 (1):1-34.
    Pour prouver que l'Instinct est une réalité scientifiquement établie, l'auteur procéde comme suit. Répondant à ceux qui prétendent qu'il n'a jamais été possible d'en donner une définition satisfaisante, il cite trois formules qui décrivent avec toute la clarté désirable les conditions observables de certains comportements nettement innés et spécifiques, instinctifs donc; Il réfute les raisonnements d'auteurs qui, dissimulant l'action de l'Instinct derriére le rôle rempli par des facultés auxiliaires, mémoire, intelligence, ont cru par cet artifice pouvoir prétendre que (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  28
    No Need for Instinct: Coordinated Communication as an Emergent Self Organized Process.Raymond W. Gibbs & Nathaniel Clark - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):241-262.
    Language serves many purposes in our individual lives and our varied interpersonal interactions. Daniel Everett's claim that language primarily emerges from an “interactional instinct“ and not a classic “language instinct“ gives proper weight to the importance of coordinated communication in meeting our adaptive needs. Yet the argument that language is a “cultural tool“, motivated by an underlying “instinct“, does not adequately explain the complex, yet complementary nature of both linguistic regularities and variations in everyday speech. Our alternative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  45
    Philosophy, Instinct, Intuition: What Motivates the Scientist in Search of a Theory?Peter J. Bowler - 2000 - Biology and Philosophy 15 (1):93-101.
    This article questions whether philosophical considerations play any substantial role in the actual process of scientific research. Using examples mostly from the nineteenth century, it suggests that scientists generally choose their basic theoretical orientation, and their research strategies, on the basis of non-rationalized feelings which might be described as instinct or intuition. In one case where methodological principles were the driving force (Charles Lyell's uniformitarian geology), the effect was counterproductive.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  33
    Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. [REVIEW]Tomas Hribek - 2011 - Estetika 48 (2):248-253.
    A review of Denis Dutton´s The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2009, 280 pp. ISBN 978-1-59691-401-8).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  15
    ‘How Very Lacanian’: From Fantasy to Hyperreality in Basic Instinct 2.Mark Fisher - 2007 - Film-Philosophy 11 (3):74-85.
    ‘How very Lacanian’, psychoanalyst Milena Gardosh observes at onepoint in Michael Caton-Jones’ Basic Instinct 2 : a line that would become notorious.1The question is: just how Lacanian is Basic Instinct 2?
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  27
    Money and the Autonomy Instinct.Siegfried Dewitte - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):184-185.
    Applying the reciprocity instinct to monetary transactions implies that the reaction to monetary debt and monetary credit are similar. However, evidence suggests an asymmetry. I suggest that the “autonomy instinct” fits better with human behavior towards money. I show that people value autonomy, and I show how money can serve this instinct. (Published Online April 5 2006).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  15
    Roles of Implicit Processes: Instinct, Intuition, and Personality.Ron Sun & Nick Wilson - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (1):109-134.
    The goal of this research is to explore implicit and explicit processes in shaping an individual’s characteristic behavioral patterns, that is, personality. The questions addressed are how psychological processes may be separated into implicit and explicit types, and how such a separation figures into personality. In particular, it focuses on the role of instinct and intuition in determining personality. This paper argues that personality may be fundamentally based on instincts resulting from basic human motivation, along with related processes, within (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  19
    The Art Instinct.Mohan Matthen - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):337-356.
    Denis Dutton died a day or two after Christmas in 2010. I had the good fortune to meet him in February 2010, when I participated in an Author-Meets-Critics session on The Art Instinct at the American Philosophical Association, Central Division. (The Critical Notice that follows is a development of my comments there.) Dennis was a passionate, intelligent, influential, and well connected man, who had a vigorous philosophical mind, fully on display in The Art Instinct. Outside of academic philosophy, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  8
    No Need for Instinct.Raymond W. Gibbs & Nathaniel Clark - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):241-262.
    Language serves many purposes in our individual lives and our varied interpersonal interactions. Daniel Everett’s claim that language primarily emerges from an “interactional instinct” and not a classic “language instinct” gives proper weight to the importance of coordinated communication in meeting our adaptive needs. Yet the argument that language is a “cultural tool”, motivated by an underlying “instinct”, does not adequately explain the complex, yet complementary nature of both linguistic regularities and variations in everyday speech. Our alternative (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  6
    The Existence of God and the Faith-Instinct.Howard Kainz - unknown
    Responding to the rash of books supporting a "new atheism" in recent years, some excellent rebuttals and refutations by Berlinski, Novak, Hart, Day, and others have also been published. The present book, however, is not a continuation of these critical salvos against the likes of Dawkins, Hitchens, Dennett, and Harris, but engages in a fresh reexamination of several important aspects of the "God-question," along with an exploration of the theory of the "faith-instinct"---a theory that emerges from a respectably long (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  6
    The God Instinct [Book Review].Jean Brown - 2015 - Australian Humanist, The 118:23.
    Brown, Jean Review of: The God instinct, by Jesse Bering, London, Nicholas Breakley, 2011. Paperback, 252 pp.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  7
    Freud's Trieb as Instinct 1: Sexuality and Reproduction.Richard Theisen Simanke - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (1):73-95.
    O conceito freudiano de "impulso", ou "instinto" (Trieb), é reconhecidamente um dos conceitos mais fundamentais da psicanálise. No entanto, seu sentido ainda é objeto de controvérsia. Originalmente definido por Freud em um sentido biológico ou quase biológico, sua recepção em muitas das diversas tradições pós-freudianas tendeu, frequentemente, a recusar essa filiação epistemológica inicial. Um dos sinais dessa reorientação doutrinária é a recusa da tradução de "Trieb" por "instinto" e a preferência pelo neologismo "pulsão", de origem francesa e comum na literatura (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  2
    Criticism of Gehlen’s Theory of Instinct-Reduction and Phenomenological Clarification of the Concept of Instinct as the Genetic Origin of Embodied Consciousness.Lee Nam-In - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):355-371.
    In the past 20 years, the concept of instinct has been discussed in respect to various disciplines such as evolutionary biology, evolutionary psychology, linguistics, ethics, aesthetics, and phenomenology, etc. However, the meaning of instinct still remains unclarified in many respects. In order to overcome this situation, it is necessary to elucidate the genuine meaning of instinct so that the discussion of instinct in these disciplines can be carried out systematically. The objective of this paper is to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  5
    Freud's Trieb as Instinct 2: Aggression and Self-Destructiveness.Richard Theisen Simanke - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (3):439-464.
    O conceito freudiano de impulso ou instinto é reconhecidamente um dos conceitos mais fundamentais da psicanálise. No entanto, seu sentido ainda é objeto de controvérsia. Originalmente definido por Freud num sentido biológico ou quase biológico, sua recepção em muitas das diversas tradições pós-freudianas tendeu, frequentemente, a recusar essa filiação epistemológica inicial. Um dos sinais dessa reorientação doutrinária é a recusa da tradução de Trieb por "instinto" e a preferência pelo neologismo "pulsão", de origem francesa e comum na literatura psicanalítica escrita (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  6
    Instinct and Moral Life.Louis Arnaud Reid - 1928 - Philosophy 3 (10):173-.
    The problem before us is the question: How far is the term ‘ instinct ‘ applicable in ethics? How far is it true to say that instincts are the determinants of the good, or moral, life? And if it is true at all to say they are determinants, how Far is it true?
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  1
    Dualistic Expressions: Learning and Instinct.Carter Zeleznik - 1962 - Dialectica 16 (1):39-44.
    The problem of the relation between the symbol and that which it represents is not only a problem in epistemology, but it has a clear counterpart in formal logic where it may be associated with the theory of types and in empirical sciences, such as psychology, where it is met in a variety of contexts including the dichotomy between learning and instinct or between environment and heredity.Such dualistic distinctions may be shown to be convenient for purposes of decision making (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Teaching Instinct: Explorations Into What Makes Us Human.Kip Téllez - 2016 - Routledge.
    How we select, prepare, and support teachers has become a surprisingly common topic among journalists, politicians, and policymakers. Contemporary recommendations on teaching and teachers, whatever their intentions, fail to assess this deeply human activity from its historical roots. In _The Teaching Instinct: Explorations Into What Makes Us Human_, Kip Téllez invites us to reappraise teaching through a wide lens and argues that our capacity to teach is one part culture, two parts genetic. By rescuing the field of instinct (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Study of Instinct.N. Tinbergen - 1954 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (17):72-76.
  50. The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution.Mara Miller - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):333-336.
1 — 50 / 620