Results for 'Instrumentality'

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  1.  45
    Beyond the Bounded Instrumentality in Current Corporate Sustainability Research: Toward an Inclusive Notion of Profitability. [REVIEW]Tobias Hahn & Frank Figge - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):325-345.
    We argue that the majority of the current approaches in research on corporate sustainability are inconsistent with the notion of sustainable development. By defining the notion of instrumentality in the context of corporate sustainability through three conceptual principles we show that current approaches are rooted in a bounded notion of instrumentality which establishes a systematic a priori predominance of economic organizational outcomes over environmental and social aspects. We propose an inclusive notion of profitability that reflects the return on (...)
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  2.  3
    Extensive Knowledge Integration Strategies in Pre-Service Teachers: The Role of Perceived Instrumentality, Motivation, and Self-Regulation.Jumi Lee & Jeannine E. Turner - forthcoming - Educational Studies:1-16.
    This study investigated contributions of pre-service teachers’ endogenous and exogenous instrumentalities, their intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, and their use of self-regulation strategies to explain the extent to which they used strategies to purposefully integrate their knowledge across courses. With a total of 254 pre-service teachers’ survey-responses, results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that their endogenous instrumentality of their current coursework, their use of metacognitive strategies and their use of deeper cognitive learning strategies contributed to explaining their use (...)
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  3.  16
    Passion and Instrumentality.Alan McQuillan - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (3):317-324.
    Although J. Baird Callicott and Bryan G. Norton define the word intrinsic quite differently, both are against any “essentialist” position which posits “an objectivist theory of value in nature.” Viewed in this context, their differences emerge in terms of instrumentality and anthropocentrism. While a nonanthropocentrist position is tenable, it cannot be divorced from the centrality of human passion and desire. From the Humean perspective, assumed by both authors, however, desire does not reduce to instrumental value alone. As a result, (...)
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  4.  1
    Christian Instrumentality of Sport as a Possible Source of Goodness for Atheists.Ivo Jirásek - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):30-49.
    The aim of this paper is to differentiate between religion and spirituality more strictly, or, specifically, between the religious and spiritual aspects of sport. The text is written in an autoethnographic genre from an ‘outsider’ position, by an author who is not Christian. Religion, including Christianity, represents a connectedness between the natural world and an ontologically different reality and its transcendence towards the sacrum. But spirituality is the centre of the human way of being and a manifestation of personality. So (...)
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  5.  88
    Ignorance, Instrumentality, Compensation, and the Problem of Evil.Marilyn McCord Adams - 2013 - Sophia 52 (1):7-26.
    Some theodicists, skeptical theists, and friendly atheists agree that God-justifying reasons for permitting evils would have to have an instrumental structure: that is, the evils would have to be necessary to secure a great enough good or necessary to prevent some equally bad or worse evil. D.Z. Phillips contends that instrumental reasons could never justify anyone for causing or permitting horrendous evils and concludes that the God of Restricted Standard Theism does not exist—indeed, is a conceptual mistake. After considering Phillips’ (...)
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  6.  40
    The Instrumentality of Music.Philip Alperson - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):37–51.
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  7.  3
    Performance Management Using Health Outcomes: In Search of Instrumentality.H. T. Davies - 1998 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (4):359-362.
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  8.  36
    The Instrumentality of Passion in the World of Reason: Hegel and Marx.Schlomo Avineri - 1973 - Political Theory 1 (4):388-398.
  9.  11
    Heidegger’s Dasein-Analytic of Instrumentality In Being and Time and the Thinking of The “Extreme Danger” of the Question of Technology, and Frederick Tonnies’Community And Society.Richard A. Cohen - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):91-100.
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  10.  17
    Buddhist Functionalism—Instrumentality Reaffirmed.David Scott - 1995 - Asian Philosophy 5 (2):127 – 149.
    Abstract This article seeks to determine if Buddhism can best be understood as primarily a functionalist tradition. In pursuing this, some analogies arise with various Western strands?particularly James? ?pragmatism?, Dewey's ?instrumentalism?, Braithwaite's ?empiricism?, Wittgenstein's ?language games?, and process thinkers like Hartshorne and Jacobson. Within the Buddhist setting, the traditional Therav?da framework of sila (ethics/precepts), sam?dhi (meditation) and pañña (wisdom) are examined, together with Therav?da rituals. Despite some ?correspondence? approaches with regard to truth claim statements, e.g. vipassan? ?insight? and Abhidharma analysis, (...)
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  11.  6
    Instrumentality, Complexity, and Reason: A Christian Approach to Religions.Terry C. Muck - 2002 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 22 (1):115-121.
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  12.  5
    Affect and Instrumentality: An Alternative View on Eibl-Eibesfeldt's Human Ethology.Peter C. Reynolds - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):267.
  13.  3
    The Instrumentality of Passion in the World of Reason.Schlomo Avineri - 1973 - Political Theory 1 (4):388-398.
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  14.  3
    Housing Support Workers as Equilibrists Between Instrumentality and Situation.Ulf Ericsson & Anita Bengtsson Tops - 2014 - Vulnerable Groups and Inclusion 5.
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  15.  4
    Performance Management Using Health Outcomes: In Search of Instrumentality.H. T. O. Davies Phd Hon Mfphm - 1998 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (4):359-362.
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  16.  1
    Heidegger’s Dasein-Analytic of Instrumentality In Being and Time and the Thinking of The “Extreme Danger” of the Question of Technology, and Frederick Tonnies’Community And Society.Richard A. Cohen - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):91-100.
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  17.  2
    Rethinking Instrumentality: Natural Philosophy and Christian Charity in the Early Modern Atlantic World.Sarah Irving - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):55-76.
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  18.  4
    The Presidential Address: The Instrumentality of Language.A. M. MacIver - 1961 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 62 (1):1 - 20.
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  19.  1
    Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Problem of Instrumentality 'of Logic. Notes on in A. Pr. 2, 22-33'.Ricardo Salles - 2009 - Estudios de Filosofía 40:223-243.
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  20.  1
    Instrumentality, Hermeneutics and the Place of Science in the School Curriculum.James Donnelly - 2002 - Science & Education 11 (2):135-153.
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  21. The Instrumentality of Music.Philip Alperson - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):37-51.
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  22. INSTRUMENTALITY Selection in Naturally Occurring Conversation: A Research Agenda.Allen D. Grimshaw - 1981 - In Paul Werth (ed.), Conversation and Discourse. St. Martins Press. pp. 41.
     
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  23. Divine Providence and Instrumentality: Metaphors for Time in Self-Organizing Systems and Divine Action.Stephen Happel - 1995 - In R. J. Russell, N. Murphy & A. R. Peacocke (eds.), Chaos and Complexity. Vatican Observatory Publications.
     
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  24. Non-Violence, Compassion, and Instrumentality: A Jaina Perspective: Papers Presented at a National Seminar Held at University of Madras, 13-14 February 2009. [REVIEW]Jayanti Lal Jain (ed.) - 2009 - Research Foundation for Jainology.
     
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  25. The Instrumentality of Language. The Presidential Address.A. M. Maciver - 1962 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 62:1.
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  26. Department of Philosophy California State University Chico. California Sartre on Constitution: Gestalt Theory, Instrumentality.Adrian Mirvish - 2001 - Existentia 11:407.
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  27. Sartre on Constitution: Gestalt Theory, Instrumentality and Overcoming of Dualism.Adrian Mirvish - 2001 - Existentia 11 (3-4):407-425.
     
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  28.  11
    Instrumental Values €“ Strong and Weak.Toni Rønnow‐Rasmussen - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):23-43.
    What does it mean that an object has instrumental value? While some writers seem to think it means that the object bears a value, and that instrumental value accordingly is a kind of value, other writers seem to think that the object is not a value bearer but is only what is conducive to something of value. Contrary to what is the general view among philosophers of value, I argue that if instrumental value is a kind of value, then it (...)
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  29.  45
    Instrumental Values – Strong and Weak.Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):23 - 43.
    What does it mean that an object has instrumental value? While some writers seem to think it means that the object bears a value, and that instrumental value accordingly is a kind of value, other writers seem to think that the object is not a value bearer but is only what is conducive to something of value. Contrary to what is the general view among philosophers of value, I argue that if instrumental value is a kind of value, then it (...)
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  30.  7
    Practical Reasoning In 11 Easy Steps. Gerald - manuscript
    The nature of practical reasoning is a matter of considerable philosophical interest, particularly the extent to which the process can be understood in terms of standard (i.e. deductive) reasoning, and what form it might take. Even were it to turn out, e.g. as per Aristotle, that essential elements cannot be accommodated deductively, it would still remain of interest to delimit any and all respects that can be so accommodated. -/- In the following I wish to demonstrate that the culmination of (...)
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  31.  22
    Res, Veluti Per Machinas, Conficiatur: Natural History and the 'Mechanical' Reform of Natural Philosophy.Ian G. Stewart - 2012 - Early Science and Medicine 17 (1-2):1-2.
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  32.  17
    The Role of Culture in the Technological Advancement Process.Danila Bertasio - 1993 - AI and Society 7 (3):248-252.
    The role of cultural models in the process of adaptation to the new technologies is very different according to different civilizations. Some basic cultural items seem to be particularly crucial, such as, for example, the levels of pragmatism or rationalism which characterize a civilization or some periods of its history. This paper presents a sketch aimed at setting up a comparison between Western and Eastern cultures facing the problem of adapting to new technologies. The concept ofcold utilitarianism is introduced. It (...)
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  33. Vollkommenes hält sich fern. Ästhetische Näherungen.Andreas Dorschel & Philip Alperson - 2012 - Universal Edition.
    In ‘Vollkommenes hält sich fern’ (‘Perfection keeps itself aloof’) – the book title is drawn from a verse of American poet Kimberly Johnson (*1971) –, Philip Alperson and Andreas Dorschel discuss issues in the philosophy of music and general aesthetics related to the body, to practices and genres, values and education.
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  34. Simulation Trouble.Shaun Gallagher - 2007 - Social Neuroscience 2 (3-4):353–365.
    I present arguments against both explicit and implicit versions of the simulation theory for intersubjective understanding. Logical, developmental, and phenomenological evidence counts against the concept of explicit simulation if this is to be understood as the pervasive or default way that we understand others. The concept of implicit (subpersonal) simulation, identified with neural resonance systems (mirror systems or shared representations), fails to be the kind of simulation required by simulation theory, because it fails to explain how neuronal processes meet constraints (...)
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  35.  65
    The Effects of Ethical Climates on Bullying Behaviour in the Workplace.Füsun Bulutlar & Ela Ünler Öz - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (3):273-295.
    Various aspects of the relationship between ethical climate types and organizational commitment have been examined, although a relationship with the concept of bullying, which may be very detrimental to an organization, has not attracted significant attention. This study contributes to the existing research by taking the effects of bullying behaviour into consideration. The aim of this study is to explore the effects of bullying behaviour upon the relationship between ethical climate types and organizational commitment. It will be noted that work-related (...)
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  36. Divine Hiddenness in the Christian Tradition.Edgar Danielyan - manuscript
    A critique of J. L. Schellenberg's argument from Divine Hiddenness: Schellenberg's conclusion that since apparently there are 'capable inculpable non-believers in God' the cognitive problem of divine hiddenness is actually an argument for the non-existence of God. Schellenberg's conclusion seems at least partly based on his misunderstanding or disregard of significant aspects of the Judeo-Christian tradition and certain assumptions, especially regarding nature of religious belief as well as primacy and instrumentality of reason. I suggest that given the kind of (...)
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  37.  38
    Nurturing the Whole Person: The Ethics of Workplace Spirituality in a Society of Organizations.Mathew L. Sheep - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):357-375.
    In a world which can be increasingly described as a “society of organizations,” it is incumbent upon organizational researchers to account for the role of organizations in determining the well-being of societies and the individuals that comprise them. Workplace spirituality is a young area of inquiry with potentially strong relevance to the well-being of individuals, organizations, and societies. Previous literature has not examined ethical dilemmas related to workplace spirituality that organizations might expect based upon the co-existence of multiple ethical work (...)
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  38.  73
    Differentiating and Defusing Theoretical Ecology's Criticisms: A Rejoinder to Sagoff's Reply to Donhauser (2016).Justin Donhauser - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 63:70-79.
    In a (2016) paper in this journal, I defuse allegations that theoretical ecological research is problematic because it relies on teleological metaphysical assumptions. Mark Sagoff offers a formal reply. In it, he concedes that I succeeded in establishing that ecologists abandoned robust teleological views long ago and that they use teleological characterizations as metaphors that aid in developing mechanistic explanations of ecological phenomena. Yet, he contends that I did not give enduring criticisms of theoretical ecology a fair shake in my (...)
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  39.  61
    Reasonable Partiality and the Agent’s Point of View.Alan Thomas - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):25-43.
    It is argued that reasonable partiality allows an agent to attach value to particular objects of attachment via recognition of the value of the holding of that relation between agent and object. The reasonableness of partiality is ensured by a background context set by the agent's virtues, notably justice. It is argued that reasonable partiality is the only view that is compatible with our best account of the nature of self-knowledge. That account rules out any instrumental relationship between moral demands (...)
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  40.  14
    What Is the History of Science the History Of?: Early Modern Roots of the Ideology of Modern Science.Peter Dear - 2005 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 96:390-406.
    The mismatch between common representations of “science” and the miscellany of materials typically studied by the historian of science is traced to a systematic ambiguity that may itself be traced to early modern Europe. In that cultural setting, natural philosophy came to be rearticulated as involving both contemplative and practical knowledge. The resulting tension and ambiguity are illustrated by the eighteenth‐century views of Buffon. In the nineteenth century, a new enterprise called “science” represents the establishment of an unstable ideology of (...)
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  41.  10
    Can a Machine Think ? Automation Beyond Simulation.M. Beatrice Fazi - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    This article will rework the classical question ‘Can a machine think?’ into a more specific problem: ‘Can a machine think anything new?’ It will consider traditional computational tasks such as prediction and decision-making, so as to investigate whether the instrumentality of these operations can be understood in terms of the creation of novel thought. By addressing philosophical and technoscientific attempts to mechanise thought on the one hand, and the philosophical and cultural critique of these attempts on the other, I (...)
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  42.  21
    Ethical Dilemmas in Mncs' International Staffing Policies a Conceptual Framework.Moshe Banai & Linda M. Sama - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 25 (3):221-235.
    Multinational corporations' international staffing policies have been evaluated in terms of cost and efficiency arguments. Research has not addressed, however, the ethical impact of these policies on diverse stakeholder groups. This paper presents a conceptual framework by which ethnocentric, polycentric and geocentric staffing policies are theoretically linked to underlying decision-making modes of instrumentality, bounded rationality and economic rationality, respectively. It goes on to describe the ethical rationales associated with each policy type, namely, distributive justice, moral rights of man, and (...)
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  43. The Pregnancy of the Real: A Phenomenological Defense of Experimental Realism.Shannon Vallor - 2009 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):1 – 25.
    This paper develops a phenomenological defense of Ian Hacking's experimental realism about unobservable entities in physical science, employing historically undervalued resources from the phenomenological tradition in order to clarify the warrant for our ontological commitments in science. Building upon the work of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and Heelan, the paper provides a phenomenological correction of the positivistic conception of perceptual evidence maintained by antirealists such as van Fraassen, the experimental relevance of which is illustrated through a phenomenological interpretation of the 1974 discovery (...)
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  44.  17
    This Body of Art: The Singular Plural of the Feminine.Helen Fielding - 2005 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 36:277-292.
    I explore the possibility that the feminine, like art, can be thought in terms of Jean-Luc Nancy’s concept of the singular plural. In Les Muses, Nancy claims that art provides for the rethinking of a technë not ruled by instrumentality. Specifically, in rethinking aesthetics in terms of the debates laid out by Kant, Hegel and Heidegger, he resituates the ontological in terms of the specificity of the techniques of each particular artwork; each artwork establishes relations particular to its world (...)
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  45. Perception, Cognition, and Consciousness in Classical Hindu Psychology.K. Ramakrishna Rao - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):3-30.
    Perception is sensory awareness. Cognition is reflective awareness. Consciousness is awareness-as-such. In Indian psychology, as represented by Samkhya-Yoga and Advaita Vedanta systems, consciousness and mind are fundamentally different. Reality is the composite of being (sat), knowing (cit) and feeling (ananda). Consciousness is the knowledge side of the universe. It is the ground condition of all awareness. Consciousness is not a part or aspect of the mind. Mind is physical and consciousness is not. Consciousness does not interact with the mind, the (...)
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  46.  38
    Collectivism, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Resource Advantages in Retailing.Yu-Chiang Hu & Chia-Ching Fatima Wang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):1-13.
    Is corporate social responsibility linked to performance-related instrumentality or real moral concerns? Does CSR create resource advantages? Reasons for and results of CSR remain unclear. We choose a leading retail company in a Confucian, collectivist, and high power distance society and ask whether managers are naturally oriented toward societal actions. We study managerial perceptions regarding the importance and the performance of CSR in relation to other management factors. Drawing on Hunt's ) resource advantage theory, we find that the perceived (...)
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  47.  87
    Musical Twofoldness.Bence Nanay - 2012 - The Monist 95 (4):607-624.
    The concept of twofoldness plays an important role in understanding the aesthetic appreciation of pictures. My claim is that it also plays an important role in understanding the aesthetic appreciation of musical performances. I argue that when we are aesthetically appreciating the performance of a musical work, we are simultaneously attending to both the features of the performed musical work and the features of the token performance we are listening to. This twofold experience explains a number of salient aspects of (...)
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  48. Commodification Arguments for the Legal Prohibition of Organ Sale.Stephen Wilkinson - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (2):189-201.
    The commercial trading of human organs, along withvarious related activities (for example, advertising)was criminalised throughout Great Britain under theHuman Organ Transplants Act 1989.This paper critically assesses one type of argumentfor this, and similar, legal prohibitions:commodification arguments.Firstly, the term `commodification' is analysed. Thiscan be used to refer to either social practices or toattitudes. Commodification arguments rely on thesecond sense and are based on the idea that having acommodifying attitude to certain classes of thing(e.g. bodies or persons) is wrong. The commodifyingattitude consists (...)
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  49.  11
    The Motivational Bases of Attitudes Toward Animals.Adelma M. Hills - 1993 - Society and Animals 1 (2):111-128.
    The need for a theoretical grounding of the human-animal relationship is addressed from the perspective of the motivational bases of attitudes toward animals. Building on recent developments in attitude theory, and integrating themes from the historical and cultural background to Western attitudes, a model is developed that proposes three fundamental motivational bases, where responses to animals depend on instrumental self interest, empathylidentification, or people's beliefs and values about the nature and status of animals. Initial empirical studies using the model revealed (...)
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  50.  39
    Epistemic Means and Ends: In Defense of Some Sartwellian Insights.Frank Hofmann - 2005 - Synthese 146 (3):357-369.
    The question of what means-and-ends structure our epistemic endeavors have is an important issue in recent epistemology, and is fundamental for understanding epistemic matters in principle. Crispin Sartwell has proposed arguments for the view that knowledge is our only ultimate goal, and justification is no part of it. An important argument is his instrumentality argument which is concerned with the conditions under which something could belong to our ultimate epistemic goal. Recently, this argument has been reconstructed and criticized by (...)
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