Results for 'Intellect History'

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  1. The Meritocratic Intellect: Studies in the History of Educational Research by James V. Smith; David Hamilton. [REVIEW]Donald Mackenzie - 1982 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 73:128-128.
     
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  2.  56
    A Brief History of the Mind: From Apes to Intellect and Beyond.William H. Calvin - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    This book looks back at the simpler versions of mental life in apes, Neanderthals, and our ancestors, back before our burst of creativity started 50,000 years...
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  3.  34
    Plotinus John Bussanich: The One and its Relation to Intellect in Plotinus: A Commentary on Selected Texts. (Philosophia Antiqua, 49.) Pp. Vii+258. Leiden, New York, Copenhagen, Cologne: E. J. Brill, 1988. Paper, Gld. 90. Gary M. Gurtler: Plotinus: The Experience of Unity. (American University Studies, Series V, 43.) Pp. Xiii+320. New York, Bern, Frankfurt Am Main, Paris: Peter Lang, 1988. Cased, $43.40. Frederic M. Schroeder: Form and Transformation: A Study in the Philosophy of Plotinus. (McGill–Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas, 16.) Pp. Xiv+125. Montreal, Kingston, London, Buffalo: McGill–Queen's University Press, 1992. Cased, £25.95. [REVIEW]G. J. P. O'daly - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (02):311-314.
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  4.  16
    Michel Foucault and the Subversion of the Intellect_, And: _Michel Foucault: The Freedom of Philosophy_, And: _Foucault, Marxism and History: Mode of Production Versus Mode of Information (Review).John J. Stuhr - 1987 - Philosophy and Literature 11 (1):148-162.
  5.  5
    New York Intellect: A History of Intellectual Life in New York City, From 1750 to the Beginning of Our Own Time. Thomas Bender.Michael M. Sokal - 1990 - Isis 81 (1):85-85.
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  6.  4
    The Meritocratic Intellect: Studies in the History of Educational ResearchJames V. Smith David Hamilton.Donald MacKenzie - 1982 - Isis 73 (1):128-128.
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  7.  1
    The Meritocratic Intellect: Studies in the History of Educational Research.L. S. Hearnshaw, James V. Smith & David Hamilton - 1982 - British Journal of Educational Studies 30 (2):239.
  8. Elective Metaphysical Affinities: Emerson's The Natural History of Intellect and Peirce's Synechism'.David A. Dilworth - 2010 - Cognitio 11 (1).
     
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  9. Elective Metaphysical Affinities: Emerson’s “Natural History of Intellect” and Peirce’s Synechism: Afinidades Metafísicas Eletivas: A “História Natural Do Intelecto” de Emerson E o Sinequismo de Peirce.David Dilworth - 2010 - Cognitio 11 (1).
     
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  10. Iina Kohonen. Picturing the Cosmos: A Visual History of Early Soviet Space Endeavor. 205 Pp., Notes, Figs., Bibl. Bristol/Chicago: Intellect, 2017. $36.50 . ISBN 9781783207428. [REVIEW]W. Henry Lambright - 2019 - Isis 110 (3):655-656.
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  11.  30
    Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs.Joseph M. Magee - 2003 - Greenwood Press.
  12.  8
    Love and Understanding: The Relation of Will and Intellect in Pierre Rousselot's Christological Vision.John M. McDermott - 1983 - Università Gregoriana.
    Abridgement of thesis (doctoral)--Gregorian University, Rome.
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  13.  20
    Art and Intellect.M. A. B. Degenhardt - 1991 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 11 (2):135-148.
  14. Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale = Intellect and Imagination in Medieval Philosophy = Intelecto E Imaginaçao Na Filosofia Medieval: Actes du Xie Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, S.I.E.P.M., Porto, du 26 au 31 Août 2002. [REVIEW]Maria Cândida da Costa Reis Monteiro Pacheco & José Francisco Meirinhos (eds.) - 2004 - Brepols Publishers.
  15.  45
    Pomponazzi Contra Averroes on the Intellect.John Sellars - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):45-66.
    This paper examines Pomponazzi's arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle's remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi's response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi's (...)
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  16. The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy.Christopher Gill (ed.) - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection of essays explores analogous issues in classical and modern philosophy that relate to the concepts of person and human being. A primary focus is whether there are such analogous issues, and whether we can find in ancient philosophy a notion that is comparable to "person" as understood in modern philosophy. Essays on modern philosophy reappraise the validity of the notion of person, while essays on classical philosophy take up the related questions of what being "human" entails in ancient (...)
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  17.  36
    The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century.Richard C. Dales - 1995 - E.J. Brill.
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  18.  7
    From Natural Disability to the Moral Man: Calvinism and the History of Psychology.C. F. Goodey - 2001 - History of the Human Sciences 14 (3):1-29.
    Some humanist theologians within the French Reformed Church in the 17th century developed the notion that a disability of the intellect could exist in nature independently of any moral defect, freeing its possessors from any obligations of natural law. Sharpened by disputes with the church leadership, this notion began to suggest a species-type classification that threatened to override the importance of the boundary between elect and reprobate in the doctrine of predestination. This classification seems to look forward to the (...)
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  19.  28
    6. The Archetype of History in the Confucian Ecumene.Masayuki Sato - 2007 - History and Theory 46 (2):218–232.
    Cultures are constituted by binary oppositions: the absolute and the relative; the perfect and the imperfect; the stable and the unstable. Many of the world’s cultures have looked to revealed religion to discover the absolute: that which transcends the human, the intellect, and space and time. By positing a God who is omniscient and omnipotent, they conceive of an eternal and absolute that continues to exist in an immutable state.In such cultures new perspectives for reinterpreting the past are continually (...)
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  20. Kojŏn Tasi Ilki.Hyŏng-ik Chʻoe (ed.) - 2007 - Meidei.
    1. Singminjijŏk sayu ŭi chŏnbok ŭl wihae.
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  21. Los Hábitos Intelectuales Según Tomás de Aquino.Sellés Dauder & Juan Fernando - 2008 - Eunsa.
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  22. Geist Und Natur: Von den Vorsokratikern Zur Kritischen Theorie.Konstantinos Rantis - 2004 - Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft.
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  23. Why the View of Intellect in De Anima I 4 Isn’T Aristotle’s Own.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):241-254.
    In De Anima I 4, Aristotle describes the intellect (nous) as a sort of substance, separate and incorruptible. Myles Burnyeat and Lloyd Gerson take this as proof that, for Aristotle, the intellect is a separate eternal entity, not a power belonging to individual humans. Against this reading, I show that this passage does not express Aristotle’s own views, but dialectically examines a reputable position (endoxon) about the intellect that seems to show that it can be subject to (...)
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  24. Lectures on the History of Philosophy: Volume Iii: Medieval and Modern Philosophy.G. W. F. Hegel - 2009 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Hegel Lectures SeriesSeries Editor: Peter C. Hodgson Hegel's interpretation of the history of philosophy not only played a central role in the shaping of his own thought, but also has had a great influence on the development of historical thinking. In his own view the study of the history of philosophy is the study of philosophy itself. This explains why such a large proportion of his lectures, from 1805 to 1831, the year of his death, were about (...)
     
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  25.  28
    Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life.Jessica Riskin (ed.) - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    Since antiquity, philosophers and engineers have tried to take life’s measure by reproducing it. Aiming to reenact Creation, at least in part, these experimenters have hoped to understand the links between body and spirit, matter and mind, mechanism and consciousness. Genesis Redux examines moments from this centuries-long experimental tradition: efforts to simulate life in machinery, to synthesize life out of material parts, and to understand living beings by comparison with inanimate mechanisms. Jessica Riskin collects seventeen essays from distinguished scholars in (...)
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  26.  65
    The Dog That is a Heavenly Constellation and the Dog That is a Barking Animal by Alexandre Koyré.Oberto Marrama - 2014 - The Leibniz Review 24:95-108.
    The article includes the French to English translation of a seminal article by Alexandre Koyré (“Le chien, constellation céleste, et le chien animal aboyant”, in Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale, 55e Année, N° 1, Jan-Mar 1950, pp. 50-59), accompanied by an explanatory introduction. Koyré's French text provides an illuminating commentary of E1p17s, where Spinoza exposes at length his account of the relationship existing between God's intellect and the human intellect. The lack of an English translation of this (...)
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  27.  18
    Plotinus on Intellect.Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Plotinus (205-269 AD) led the philosophical movement of Neoplatonism, which reinterpreted Plato's thought later in antiquity and went on to become a dominant force in the history of ideas. Emilsson's in-depth study of Plotinus' central doctrine of Intellect caters for the increasing interest in Plotinus with philosophical clarity and rigor.
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  28. Aristotle on the Intellect and Limits of Natural Science.Christopher Frey - 2018 - In John E. Sisko (ed.), Philosophy of Mind in Antiquity: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 1. New York: Routledge. pp. 160-174.
    To which science, if any, does the intellect’s study belong? Though the student of nature studies every other vital capacity, most interpreters maintain that Aristotle excludes the intellect from natural science’s domain. I survey the three main reasons that lead to this interpretation: the intellect (i) is not realized physiologically in a proprietary organ, (ii) its naturalistic study would corrupt natural science’s boundaries and leave no room for other forms of inquiry, and (iii) it is not, as (...)
     
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  29.  26
    Marc Bloch, Strange Defeat, the Historian's Craft and World War II: Writing and Teaching Contemporary History.Neil Morpeth - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (3):179-195.
    The roles of small and great books, and passionate yet well-considered writings in the general education of a “college” or “university” trained teacher are questions which should be turned back upon the historian as teacher and writer. Where resides the historian's classroom? Who are the students and how do teachers come to be? What subject matter should be used to prod and provoke an often dormant humanity awake? Professor Marc Bloch's work, his passion for history's rôles and its voices (...)
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  30.  36
    Review of 'Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life' (Riskin, 2007). [REVIEW]Daniel J. Nicholson - 2011 - Annals of Science 68 (1):136-139.
    Since antiquity, philosophers and engineers have tried to take life’s measure by reproducing it. Aiming to reenact Creation, at least in part, these experimenters have hoped to understand the links between body and spirit, matter and mind, mechanism and consciousness. Genesis Redux examines moments from this centuries-long experimental tradition: efforts to simulate life in machinery, to synthesize life out of material parts, and to understand living beings by comparison with inanimate mechanisms.Jessica Riskin collects seventeen essays from distinguished scholars in several (...)
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  31.  8
    The History of the Origin of All Things Including the Life of Jesus of Nazareth. [REVIEW]P. R. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):511-511.
    A History of man and world, God and spirit, as "written down by the medium L. M. Arnold to whom it was delivered in the words used: arranged and amended in punctuation by the intellect of man and occasional assistance of the spirit."--R. P.
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  32. The Unity of Intellect and Intelligible From a New Point of View.R. Akbari - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 20.
    "In this article, I will try to examine this doctrine from a historical point of view; this examination is, somehow, different from the critical studies on this doctrine. This doctrine should be discussed as an epistemological topic. Hence, to recognize the notion of intelligence, a glance on the history of development of this term will largely help us.''After a historical discussion from the ancient times to the present time, the author says:"``After the advent of Islam and the conquests, made (...)
     
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  33. Hegel Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6 Volume Ii Greek Philosophy.Robert F. Brown (ed.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Hegel Lectures SeriesSeries Editor: Peter C. HodgsonHegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts and manuscripts. The (...)
     
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  34. Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy: Volume III: Medieval and Modern Philosophy, Revised Edition.Robert F. Brown (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Hegel's interpretation of the history of philosophy played a central role in the shaping of his own thought, and brought about one of the determining events of modern intellectual history: the rise of a new historical consciousness of human life, culture, and intellect. This third volume of the lectures covers the medieval and modern periods.
     
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  35. Passion for Wisdom: A Very Brief History of Philosophy.Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen M. Higgins - 1997 - Oxford University Press USA.
    When the ancient Greek philosopher, Pythagoras, was asked if he was a wise man, he humbly replied "No, I am only a lover of wisdom." This love of wisdom has been central to the philosophical enterprise for thousands of years, inspiring some of the most dazzling and daring achievements of the human intellect and providing the very basis for how we understand the world. Now, readers eager to acquire a basic familiarity with the history of philosophy but intimidated (...)
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  36.  9
    Human Life and the Natural World: Readings in the History of Western Philosophy.Owen Goldin & Patricia Kilroe (eds.) - 1997 - Broadview Press.
    Human concern over the urgency of current environmental issues increasingly entails wide-ranging discussions of how we may rethink the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world. In order to provide a context for such discussions this anthology provides a selection of some of the most important, interesting and influential readings on the subject from classical times through to the late nineteenth century. Included are such figures as Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Hildegard of Bingen, St Francis of Assisi, Bacon, (...)
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  37. History and Utopia.Richard Howard (ed.) - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this book, Cioran writes of politics, of history, and of the utopian dream. "A small masterwork... a stringent examination of some persistent and murky notions in human history.... It is best to read Cioran while sitting. The impact upon the intellect can be temporarily stunning, and motor systems may give way under the assault."—Joseph Patrick Kennedy, _Houston Chronicle_ "Cioran has a claim to be regarded as among the handful of original minds... writing today."—_New York Times_ "A (...)
     
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  38. Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume 1: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy.Robert F. Brown & Peter C. Hodgson (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This new edition of Hegel's Lectures on the History of Philosophy sets forth clearly, for the first time for the English reader, what Hegel actually said. These lectures challenged the antiquarianism of Hegel's contemporaries by boldly contending that the history of philosophy is itself philosophy, not just history. It portrays the journey of reason or spirit through time, as reason or spirit comes in stages to its full development and self-conscious existence, through the successive products of human (...)
     
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  39. Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6 Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy.G. W. F. Hegel - 2009 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This new edition of Hegel's Lectures on the History of Philosophy sets forth clearly, for the first time for the English reader, what Hegel actually said. These lectures challenged the antiquarianism of Hegel's contemporaries by boldly contending that the history of philosophy is itself philosophy, not just history. It portrays the journey of reason or spirit through time, as reason or spirit comes in stages to its full development and self-conscious existence, through the successive products of human (...)
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  40.  18
    Measurement and Meritocracy: An Intellectual History of Iq: Theodore M. Porter.Theodore M. Porter - 2009 - Modern Intellectual History 6 (3):637-644.
    Is intelligence a fit topic for intellectual history? The creation and institutionalization of IQ have been a favorite topic in the history of psychology, and have even achieved some standing in social histories of class, race, and mobility, especially in the United States. The campaign to quantify intelligence tended to remove it from the domain of intellectual history, which after all has traditionally emphasized ideas and interpretations. Measurement, and not alone of the mind, was pursued as a (...)
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  41.  78
    L’'me logos de l’intellect et le logismos de l’'me. À propos des Ennéades V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27].Filip Karfík - 2011 - Chôra 9:67-80.
    The paper raises the question of the relationship between the description of the soul as logos and the description of its cognitive activities as logismos in Plotinus’ Enneads V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. It first offers an interpretation of the definition of the soul as a logos of the intellect in V, 1 [10]. Then it scrutinises the use of the terms logismos and logizesthai in the same treatise and compares it to a similar use of these (...)
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  42.  41
    Aristotle’s Concept of Intellect in the Context of His Main Philosophical Writings. [REVIEW]Henry Walter Brann - 1972 - Philosophy and History 5 (2):157-160.
  43.  51
    Intellect, Will, and Freedom in Leibniz.Michael J. Murray - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:11-12.
    In this paper I claim that there are three primary dimensions to the issue of freedom in Leibniz’s work. The first, and most widely discussed, is the logical dimension. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is concerned primarily about the relationship between freedom and modality: what does it mean for choice to be contingent? The second dimension is the theological one. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is interested in considering such issues as the relationships between divine knowledge or providence and human (...)
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  44.  51
    The Imperial Intellect.J. D. Bastable - 1956 - Philosophical Studies 6:212-213.
    This is a scholarly study of Newman’s ideal of university education, ‘the philosophy of an imperial intellect’. His chosen profession from the first consideration of either a college or pastoral mission, Newman developed his real apprehension of its nature and directing ideal from his own lived experience as student and tutor at Oxford, and later as rector and lecturer at Dublin. Within this narrow frame Mr. Culler offers a practically definitive biography, which is based not merely upon all work (...)
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  45.  19
    Knowing as Being? A Metaphysical Reading of the Identity of Intellect and Intelligibles in Aquinas.Therese Scarpelli Cory - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):333-351.
    I argue that Thomas Aquinas’s Identity Formula—the statement that the “intellect in act is the intelligible in act”—does not, as is usually supposed, express his position on how the intellect accesses extramental realities. Instead, it should be understood as a claim about the metaphysics of intellection, according to which the perfection requisite for performing the act of understanding is what could be called “intellectual-intelligible being.” In reinterpreting Aquinas’s Identity Formula, I explore the notion of being “in act” as (...)
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  46.  64
    Aristotle’s Immortal Intellect.Mark Amorose - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:97-106.
    Recent scholarship understands Aristotle to hold that the human intellect is in part corruptible and in part immortal. The main textual support claimed for this understanding is De Anima III.5, where Aristotle, it is said, presents his doctrine of an immortal active intellect and a mortal passive intellect. In this paper I show that Aristotle distinguishes at III.5 not an active and a passive intellect, but an agent and a potential intellect, both immortal. I further (...)
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  47.  51
    The Good of the Intellect.Eric D. Perl - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:25-39.
    Recent continental philosophy often seeks to retrieve Neoplatonic transcendence, or the Good, while ignoring the place of intellect in classical and medieval Neoplatonism. Instead, it attempts to articulate an encounter with radical transcendence in the immediacy of temporality, individuality, and affectivity.On the assumption that there is no intellectual intuition (Kant), intellectual consciousness is reduced to ratiocination and is taken to be “poor in intuition” (Marion). In this context, the present paper expounds Plotinus’ phenomenology of intellectual experience to show how (...)
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  48.  47
    Aquinas and Themistius on Intellect.Lorelle Lamascus - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:255-273.
    Aquinas puts forward two different, and conflicting, interpretations of Themistius’s account of the intellect. In his earlier interpretation of Themistius, Aquinas understands him to hold the position that both the possible and agent intellect are separate and incorruptible, existing apart from individual human souls but shared in by individual souls in the process of knowing. In De unitate intellectus contra averroistas, however, Aquinas radically departs from this reading, hailing Themistius as a genuine interpreter of the Peripatetic position, while (...)
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  49.  43
    Aquinas on Being and Essence As Proper Objects of the Intellect.Caery Evangelist - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):361-390.
    This article investigates a tension among Aquinas’s basic claims about what constitutes the proper object of the human intellect. Aquinas asserts that the mindhas only one proper object, yet he repeatedly endorses two different candidates for this role: the being of a thing (ens) and a thing’s essence (essentia). One might assume the tension disappears if ens signifies the essence of a thing. Alternatively, the tension seems to dissolve if each operation of the intellect (apprehension and judgment) takes (...)
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  50.  55
    The Place of Intellect in Aristotle.Kurt Pritzl - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:57-75.
    This paper explores Aristotle’s account of the human intellect, with special emphasis on how this account relates to Aristotle’s treatment of nature. In his complex account of the intellect, Aristotle distinguishes very broadly between two types of intellection. One type (nous) involves the reception of what things are and is non-discursive in character, while the other type (dianoia) is the result of intellectual activity and is discursive in character. While Aristotle affirms that both types of thinking are distinctive (...)
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