Results for 'Intellect. '

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  1.  10
    sinful, as a sin 40, 53 vicious, bad 33, 63, 87, 176 virtuous, good 33, 89, 176, 177,209 Active Intellect.Active Intellect - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 1--327.
  2.  1
    L'intellect selon Kindī.Jean Jolivet - 1971 - Leiden,: Brill. Edited by Kindī.
  3. General Intellect.Paolo Virno - 2007 - Historical Materialism 15 (3):3-8.
    As part of the Historical Materialism research stream on immaterial labour, cognitive capitalism and the general intellect, begun in issue 15.1, this articles explores the importance of the expression 'general intellect', proposed by Marx in the Grundrisse, for an analysis of linguistic and intellectual work in contemporary capitalism. It links the notion of general intellect to the crisis of the law of value, the political significance of mass intellectuality, and the definition of democracy in a world where knowledge is a (...)
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  4. Intellect versus affect: finding leverage in an old debate.Michael Milona - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (9):2251-2276.
    We often claim to know about what is good or bad, right or wrong. But how do we know such things? Both historically and today, answers to this question have most commonly been rationalist or sentimentalist in nature. Rationalists and sentimentalists clash over whether intellect or affect is the foundation of our evaluative knowledge. This paper is about the form that this dispute takes among those who agree that evaluative knowledge depends on perceptual-like evaluative experiences. Rationalist proponents of perceptualism invoke (...)
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  5.  47
    Faith & intellect: a semi - secular discourse on socio - political issues & divine revelations.Syed Muhammad Shabbar Zaidi - 2022 - Karachi: Pakistan Law House.
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  6.  99
    Ame intellective, âme cogitative: Jean de jandun et la duplex forma propria de l'homme.Jean-Baptiste Brenet - 2008 - Vivarium 46 (3):318-341.
    The article analyses the idea that according to the averroist Jean de Jandun, Master of Arts in Paris at the beginning of the 14th century, human beings are composed of a «double form» the separated intellect on the one hand, the cogitative soul on the other hand. After recalling several major accounts of the time, we explore Jean's reading of Averroes' major conceptions concerning the problem. Finally, we challenge the idea according to which we observe in his writings the radical (...)
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  7.  22
    Averroes on Intellect: From Aristotelian Origins to Aquinas' Critique.Stephen R. Ogden - 2022 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Averroes on Intellect provides a detailed analysis of the Muslim philosopher Averroes 's notorious unicity thesis -- the view that there is only one separate and eternal intellect for all human beings. It focuses directly on Averroes' arguments, both from the text of Aristotle's De Anima and, more importantly, his own philosophical arguments in the Long Commentary on the De Anima. Stephen Ogden defends Averroes' interpretation of De Anima using a combination of Greek, Arabic, Latin, and contemporary sources. Yet, Ogden (...)
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  8. Intellect, will, and the principle of alternative possibilities.Eleonore Stump - 1990 - In M. Beaty (ed.), Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 254-285.
     
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  9.  47
    Intellect: Mind Over Matter.Mortimer J. Adler - 1993 - Noûs 27 (3):406-408.
  10. Intellect et Imagination dans la Philosophie Médiévale. Actes du XIe Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la S.I.E.P.M., Porto du 26 au 31 Août 2002.M. C. Pacheco & J. Meirinhos (eds.) - 2004 - Brepols Publishers.
    Le XI.ème Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale pour l’Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale (S.I.E.P.M..) s’est déroulé à Porto (Portugal), du 26 au 30 août 2002, sous le thème général: Intellect et Imagination dans la Philosophie Médiévale. A partir des héritages platonicien, aristotélicien, stoïcien, ou néo-platonicien (dans leurs variantes grecques, latines, arabes, juives), la conceptualisation et la problématisation de l’imagination et de l’intellect, ou même des facultés de l’âme en général, apparaissaient comme une ouverture possible pour aborder (...)
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  11. Never Mind the Intuitive Intellect: Applying Kant’s Categories to Noumena.Colin Marshall - 2018 - Kantian Review 23 (1):27-40.
    According to strong metaphysical readings of Kant, Kant believes there are noumenal substances and causes. Proponents of these readings have shown that these readings can be reconciled with Kant’s claims about the limitations of human cognition. An important new challenge to such readings, however, has been proposed by Markus Kohl, focusing on Kant’s occasional statements about the divine or intuitive intellect. According to Kohl, how an intuitive intellect represents is a decisive measure for how noumena are for Kant, but an (...)
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  12.  24
    Intellect and the One in Porphyry’s Sententiae.John Dillon - 2010 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (1):27-35.
    This article seeks to provide some support for the troublesome report of Damascius in the De Principiis that, for Porphyry, the first principle is the Father of the Noetic Triad—and thus more closely implicated with the realm of Intellect and Being than would seem proper for a Neoplatonist and faithful follower of Plotinus. And yet there is evidence from other sources that Porphyry did not abandon the concept of a One above Being. A clue to the complexity of the situation (...)
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  13. Intellect and Intellectual Cognition According to James of Viterbo.Jean-Luc Solere - 2018 - In Antoine Côté & Martin Pickavé (eds.), A Companion to James of Viterbo. Leiden: Brill. pp. 218-248.
    Due to his innatist theory, James of Viterbo brings original answers to a number of late-thirteenth century questions concerning cognition. While he maintains a certain distinction between the soul and its faculties, and among these faculties, he rejects the Aristotelian distinction between agent and patient intellects. Thanks to its predispositions to knowing, the mind is able to be an agent for itself. Correlatively, James rejects the usual conception of abstraction. Neither does the intellect act on the phantasms, nor the phantasms (...)
     
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  14. Intellect in Alexander of Aphrodisias and John Philoponus: divine, human or both?Frans A. J. de Haas - 2018 - In John E. Sisko (ed.), Philosophy of mind in antiquity. New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
     
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  15.  24
    Intellect - Kronos in Plotinus. The Place of Myth in Plotinian Noetic.Izabela Jurasz - 2016 - Methodos 16.
    La référence au mythe de Kronos dans l’œuvre de Plotin occupe une place qui n’est pas facile à définir. Ce mythe est peu abordé dans le cadre des travaux sur la métaphysique plotinienne, bien que Kronos - l’Intellect dans ses rapports à l’Un et à l’Âme représente un des points particulièrement sensibles de la doctrine de Plotin. Ce motif est, en revanche, étudié en tant que l’exemple de l’exégèse d’un mythe : consternant, car il n’y a rien de plus éloigné (...)
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  16.  33
    The Senses and the Intellect.Alexander Bain - 1855 - D. Appleton and Company.
  17. Agent intellect and phantasms. On the preliminaries of peripatetic abstraction.Leen Spruit - 2004 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 82 (1):125-146.
    This paper discusses some aspects of the controversies regarding the operation of the agent intellect on sensory images. I selectively consider views developed between the 13th century and the beginning of the 17th century, focusing on positions which question the need for a (distinct) agent intellect or argue for its essential "inactivity" with respect to phantasms. My aim is to reveal limitations of the Peripatetical framework for analyzing and explaining the mechanisms involved in conceptual abstraction. The first section surveys developments (...)
     
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  18. Aristotle's Two Intellects: A Modest Proposal.Victor Caston - 1999 - Phronesis 44 (3):199-227.
    In "De anima" 3.5, Aristotle argues for the existence of a second intellect, the so-called "Agent Intellect." The logical structure of his argument turns on a distinction between different types of soul, rather than different faculties within a given soul; and the attributes he assigns to the second species make it clear that his concern here -- as at the climax of his other great works, such as the "Metaphysics," the "Nicomachean" and the "Eudemian Ethics" -- is the difference between (...)
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  19.  93
    Intellect and illumination in Malebranche.Nicholas Jolley - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):209-224.
    One of the hallmarks of Descartes' philosophy is the doctrine that the human mind has a faculty of pure intellect. This doctrine is so central to Descartes' teaching that it is difficult to believe that any of his disciplines would abandon it. Yet this is what happened in the case of Malebranche. This paper argues that in his later philosophy Malebranche adopted a theory of divine illumination which leaves no room for a Cartesian doctrine of pure intellect. It is further (...)
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  20.  29
    Intellect and Will in Zhu Xi and Meister Eckhart.Shuhong Zheng - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1319-1339.
    Such is the significance of the question concerning intellect and will that it has been discussed in both the Confucian and the Christian traditions and has even triggered two different schools of thought within each tradition. In Confucianism, it speaks of the fundamental divergence between lixue 理學 and xinxue 心學 in the Neo-Confucian movement. In the Christian tradition, it speaks of the difference between the Franciscans and the Dominicans. A comparative study of Zhu Xi, the leading master of lixue in (...)
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  21. Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4.Caleb Cohoe - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (4):347-377.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. I present Aristotle’s account of the aboutness or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On my interpretation, Aristotle’s account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms that (...)
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  22.  15
    Self-Intellection and its Epistemological Origins in Ancient Greek Thought (review).Scott Carson - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):489-490.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 42.4 (2004) 489-490 [Access article in PDF] Ian M. Crystal. Self-Intellection and its Epistemological Origins in Ancient Greek Thought. Aldershot, England: Ashgate Publishing, 2002. Pp. x + 220. Cloth, $79.95. In this excellent re-working of his King's College Ph.D. thesis, Ian Crystal presents an account of the problem of self-intellection in Greek philosophy from Parmenides through Plotinus. The problem, at least as it (...)
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  23. Abstraction and Intellection of Essences in the Latin Tradition.Ana Maria Mora-Marquez - 2022 - In Christina Thomsen Thörnqvist & Juhana Toivanen (eds.), Forms of Representation in the Aristotelian Tradition. Volume Two: Dreaming. Boston: Brill. pp. 178-204.
    Medieval Integration Challenge for Intellection (MICI) in Albert the Great, Siger of Brabant, and Radulphus Brito.
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  24.  5
    Self-intellection and Its Epistemological Origins in Ancient Greek Thought.Ian M. Crystal - 2002 - Routledge.
    Can the intellect or the intellectual faculty be its own object of thought, or can it not think or apprehend itself? This book explores the ancient treatments of the question of self-intellection - an important theme in ancient epistemology and of considerable interest to later philosophical thought. The manner in which the ancients dealt with the intellect apprehending itself, took them into both the metaphysical and epistemological domains with reflections on questions of thinking, identity and causality. Ian Crystal traces the (...)
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  25. The ‘Intellected Thing’ in Hervaeus Natalis.Hamid Taieb - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (1):26-44.
    This paper analyses the ontological status of the ‘intellected thing’ (res intellecta) in Hervaeus Natalis. For Hervaeus an intellected thing is not a thing in the outer world, but something radically different, namely an internal, mind-dependent entity, something having a peculiar mode of being, ‘esse obiective’. While Hervaeus often says that the act of intellection is directed upon real things, this does not mean that the act is directed upon things existing actually outside the mind. Hervaeus argues that the act (...)
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  26. Intellective appetite and the freedom of human action.Colleen McCluskey - 2002 - The Thomist 66 (3):421-456.
     
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  27. Singular Intellection in Medieval Commentaries on Aristotle’s De anima.Ana María Mora-Márquez - 2019 - Vivarium 57 (3-4):293-316.
    Discussions about singular cognition, and its linguistic counterpart, are by no means exclusive to contemporary philosophy. In fact, a strikingly similar discussion, to which several medieval texts bear witness, took place in the late Middle Ages. The aim of this article is to partly reconstruct this medieval discussion, as it took place in Parisian question-commentaries on Aristotle’s De anima, so as to show the progression from the rejection of singular intellection in Siger of Brabant to the descriptivist positions of John (...)
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  28. Belief, intellect, interpretation-The backbone of Saadia Gaon's depiction of humans.M. Micaninova - 2002 - Filozofia 57 (8):551-558.
    Saadia Gaon never thought much of academic discussions. His interest was rather in his contemporary, living in doubt and religious uncertainty. The author focuses on three conceptions - the backbone of his picture of a religious human being, namely belief, intellect and interpretation. Saadia's interpretation of belief and human intellect, based on the principles of Hebrew religion, underlines the specific Jewish understanding of belief, intellect and the interpretation itself.
     
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  29. The intellect in the philosophy of St. Thomas.Francis P. Clarke - 1928 - Philadelphia,: Philadelphia.
  30. Intellect, Will, and Freedom: Leibniz and His Precursors.Michael Murray - 1996 - The Leibniz Review 6:25-59.
    Among the many puzzling features of Leibniz’s philosophy, none has received more attention in the recent literature than his position on freedom. Leibniz makes his views on freedom a central theme in his philosophical writings from early in his career until its close. And yet while significant efforts have been concentrated on decoding his views on this issue, much of the discussion has focused on only one facet of Leibniz’s treatment of it. I have argued elsewhere that there are at (...)
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  31.  21
    Sense, Intellect, and Certainty: Another Look at Henry of Ghent and John Duns Scotus on Divine Illumination.Giorgio Pini - 2023 - Quaestio 22:433-450.
    The disagreement between Henry of Ghent and John Duns Scotus on divine illumination is usually recognized as a high point in the history of medieval epistemology. Still, there is much obscurity surrounding that debate, including the specific nature of the disagreement between those two thinkers. In this paper, I argue that the point at issue is the relationship between sense and intellect. Henry of Ghent, who posits a close tie between sense and intellect, holds that the senses are the only (...)
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  32.  23
    L'intellect incarné: Sur Les interprétations computationnelLes, évolutives et philosophiques de la connaissance.Klaus Mainzer - 2005 - Synthesis Philosophica 20 (2):389-406.
    La science cognitive moderne ne peut être comprise sans les progrès récents en informatique, intelligence artificielle, robotique, neuroscience, biologie, linguistique et psychologie. La philosophie analytique classique et l’intelligence artificielle traditionnelle présumaient que toutes les sortes de savoir devaient être représentées explicitement par des langages formels ou programmatiques. Cette thèse est en contradiction avec les découvertes récentes en biologie de l’évolution et en psychologie évolutive de l’organisme humain. La majeure partie de notre savoir est implicite et inconsciente. Elle n’est pas représentée (...)
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  33. The engaged intellect: philosophical essays.John Henry McDowell - 2009 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    As he practices this method, what emerges through the volume is the unity of McDowell’s own views.
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  34. The intellect, the will, and the passions: Spinoza's critique of Descartes.John Cottingham - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):239-257.
  35. The intellective soul.Eckhard Kessler - 1988 - In Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner & Eckhard Kessler (eds.), The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 485--534.
  36.  28
    9. Intellect, Will, and the Principle of Alternate Possibilities.Eleonore Stump - 1993 - In John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza (eds.), Perspectives on Moral Responsibility. Cornell University Press. pp. 237-262.
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  37. Intellect et imagination dans la philosophie médiévale = Intellect and imagination in medieval philosophy = Intelecto e imaginaçao na filosofia medieval: actes du XIe Congrès international de philosophie médiévale de la Société internationale pour l'étude de la philosophie médiévale, S.I.E.P.M., Porto, du 26 au 31 août 2002.Maria Cândida da Costa Reis Monteiro Pacheco & José Francisco Meirinhos (eds.) - 2004 - Turnhout: Brepols Publishers.
  38. Sense, intellect, and imagination in Albert, Thomas, and Siger.Edward P. Mahoney - 1982 - In Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny & Jan Pinborg (eds.), Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 602--622.
     
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  39.  69
    Intellect, Will, and Freedom in Leibniz.Michael J. Murray - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:11-12.
    In this paper I claim that there are three primary dimensions to the issue of freedom in Leibniz’s work. The first, and most widely discussed, is the logical dimension. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is concerned primarily about the relationship between freedom and modality: what does it mean for choice to be contingent? The second dimension is the theological one. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is interested in considering such issues as the relationships between divine knowledge or providence and human (...)
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  40.  12
    Intellect, Will, and Freedom in Leibniz.Michael J. Murray - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:11-12.
    In this paper I claim that there are three primary dimensions to the issue of freedom in Leibniz’s work. The first, and most widely discussed, is the logical dimension. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is concerned primarily about the relationship between freedom and modality: what does it mean for choice to be contingent? The second dimension is the theological one. When discussing this dimension, Leibniz is interested in considering such issues as the relationships between divine knowledge or providence and human (...)
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  41.  42
    The Intellect, Receptivity, and Material Singulars in Aquinas.Siobhan Nash-Marshall - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):371-388.
    Intellectual receptivity is both the prerequisite for objective human knowledge and the condition of possibility for all human knowledge. My arguments are cast in Thomistic terms. In the first part, I review the most important arguments with which Aquinas defends the receptivity of the human intellect, especially the argument from intellectual media and the argument from actualization. In the second part, I attempt to resolve the apparent contradictions involved in the claim that the intellect is receptive, contradictions that stem from (...)
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  42. Die Kritik des Intellects.Gustav Ratzenhofer - 1902 - Amsterdam,: Liberac.
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  43.  58
    Imagination, Intellect and Premotion A Psychological Theory of Domingo Báñez.David Peroutka Ocd - 2010 - Studia Neoaristotelica 7 (2):107-115.
    The notion of physical premotion (praemotio physica) is usually associated with the theological topic of divine concurrence (concursus divinus). In the present paper I argue that the Thomist Domingo Báñez (1528–1604) applied the concept of premotion (though not the expression “praemotio”) also in his psychology. According to Báñez, the active intellect (intellectus agens) communicates a kind of “actual motion” to the phantasma (i.e. the mental sensory image perceived by the imagination) in order to render it a collaborator of intellectual cognition. (...)
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  44.  16
    Intellect, Will, and Freedom.Michael Murray - 1996 - The Leibniz Review 6:25-59.
    Among the many puzzling features of Leibniz’s philosophy, none has received more attention in the recent literature than his position on freedom. Leibniz makes his views on freedom a central theme in his philosophical writings from early in his career until its close. And yet while significant efforts have been concentrated on decoding his views on this issue, much of the discussion has focused on only one facet of Leibniz’s treatment of it. I have argued elsewhere that there are at (...)
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  45. General Intellects: Twenty-Five Thinkers for the Twenty-First Century.McKenzie Wark - 2017
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  46. The Workings of the Intellect: Mind and Psychology.Gary Hatfield - 1997 - In Patricia Easton (ed.), Logic and the Workings of the Mind: The Logic of Ideas and Faculty Psychology in Early Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Co. pp. 21-45.
    Two stories have dominated the historiography of early modern philosophy: one in which a seventeenth century Age of Reason spawned the Enlightenment, and another in which a skeptical crisis cast a shadow over subsequent philosophy, resulting in ever narrower "limits to knowledge." I combine certain elements common to both into a third narrative, one that begins by taking seriously seventeenth-century conceptions of the topics and methods central to the rise of a "new" philosophy. In this revisionist story, differing approaches to (...)
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  47.  14
    Intellection, concept and semantics in the work of William of Ockham.Jean Paul Martínez Zepeda - 2020 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 46:157-180.
    Resumen El presente estudio examina el carácter semántico del concepto en la obra de Guillermo de Ockham. Trabajo que comprende las siguientes etapas: primero, análisis del concepto a partir de las teorías de abstracción formal en Avicena y Tomás de Aquino. Segundo, comprensión de la primacía del conocimiento intuitivo sobre el conocimiento abstracto para la configuración del concepto. Tercero, análisis del carácter semántico del concepto en cuanto hábito mental, ipsamet intellectio, y signo que se predica de las cosas.This study examines (...)
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  48.  19
    L’intellect agent, la lumière, l’hexis. Averroès lecteur d’Aristote et d’Alexandre d’Aphrodise.Jean‑Baptiste Brenet - 2020 - Chôra 18:431-451.
    This article examines Averroes’ interpretation, found in his Long Commentary on the De Anima, of a famous passage in Aristotle’s De An. III 5 which presents the intellect “producing all things, as a kind of positive state, like light”. Averroes, clearly heir to Alexander of Aphrodisias for whom hexis refers not to the intellect “agent” itself but to its product, defends nevertheless, via the comparison with light, the conception of the agent intellect as an hexis, which leads us to the (...)
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  49.  34
    The Intellect and the cosmos.Luc Brisson - 2016 - Methodos 16.
    La figure complexe et même contradictoire du démiurge dans le Timée de Platon a suscité plusieurs interprétations de l’Antiquité jusqu’à nos jours, même si habituellement le démiurge est considéré comme un intellect : intellect de l’âme du monde, activité productrice des Formes, Premier Moteur, divinité réalisant un plan déterminée comme le dieu de la Genèse, instrument du Bien. Le débat se poursuit, mais il est important d’insister sur l’originalité du Timée : c’est la première cosmologie dans l’Antiquité, qui fait intervenir (...)
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  50.  39
    The Intellect's Burden: Geometrical Inferences in Descartes's Theory of Vision.Jody L. Graham - 1998 - Theoria 64 (1):55-83.
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