24 found
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  1.  36
    Grey Parrot Number Acquisition: The Inference of Cardinal Value From Ordinal Position on the Numeral List.Irene M. Pepperberg & Susan Carey - 2012 - Cognition 125 (2):219-232.
  2.  33
    Developmental Plasticity and Language: A Comparative Perspective.Ulrike Griebel, Irene M. Pepperberg & D. Kimbrough Oller - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):435-445.
    The growing field of evo-devo is increasingly demonstrating the complexity of steps involved in genetic, intracellular regulatory, and extracellular environmental control of the development of phenotypes. A key result of such work is an account for the remarkable plasticity of organismal form in many species based on relatively minor changes in regulation of highly conserved genes and genetic processes. Accounting for behavioral plasticity is of similar potential interest but has received far less attention. Of particular interest is plasticity in communication (...)
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  3.  7
    Robust Representation of Shape in a Grey Parrot.Irene M. Pepperberg & Ken Nakayama - 2016 - Cognition 153:146-160.
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  4.  36
    Lack of Referential Vocal Learning From LCD Video by Grey Parrots.Irene M. Pepperberg & Steven R. Wilkes - 2004 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (1):75-97.
    Grey parrots do not acquire referential English labels when tutored with videotapes displayed on CRT screens if socially isolated, reward for attempted labels is possible, trainers direct birds’ attention to the monitor, live video feed avoids habituation or one trainer repeats labels produced on video and rewards label attempts. Because birds learned referential labels from live tutor pairs in concurrent sessions, we concluded that video failed because input lacked live social interaction and modeling. Recent studies, however, suggest that standard CRT (...)
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  5.  13
    Tool Use in Birds: An Avian Monkey Wrench?Irene M. Pepperberg - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):604-605.
  6.  25
    Difficulties with “Humaniqueness”.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):143-144.
    Explaining the transition from nonhuman to human behavior is a major scientific problem. Penn et al. argue for discontinuous evolution; they review many relevant papers but miss some that disagree with their stance. Given the shifting ground on which Penn et al.'s theories are based, and the likelihood of future studies providing additional information on continuities, a more open approach to continuity is warranted.
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  7.  16
    Culture: In the Beak of the Beholder?Spencer K. Lynn & Irene M. Pepperberg - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):341-342.
    We disagree with two of Rendell and Whitehead's assertions. Culture may be an ancestral characteristic of terrestrial cetacean ancestors; not derived via marine variability, modern cetacean mobility, or any living cetacean social structure. Furthermore, evidence for vocal behavior as culture, social stability, and cognitive ability, is richer in birds than Rendell and Whitehead portray and comparable to that of cetaceans and primates.
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  8.  40
    Avian Cognition and Social Interaction: Fifty Years of Advances.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2011 - Interaction Studies 12 (2):195-207.
    The study of animal behavior, and particularly avian behavior, has advanced significantly in the past 50 years. In the early 1960s, both ethologists and psychologists were likely to see birds as simple automatons, incapable of complex cognitive processing. Indeed, the term “avian cognition“ was considered an oxymoron. Avian social interaction was also seen as based on rigid, if sometimes complicated, patterns. The possible effect of social interaction on cognition, or vice versa, was therefore something almost never discussed. Two paradigm shifts—one (...)
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  9.  4
    Avian Cognition and Social Interaction: Fifty Years of Advances.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2011 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 12 (2):195-207.
  10. Avian Cognition and Social Interaction.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2011 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 12 (2):195-207.
    The study of animal behavior, and particularly avian behavior, has advanced significantly in the past 50 years. In the early 1960s, both ethologists and psychologists were likely to see birds as simple automatons, incapable of complex cognitive processing. Indeed, the term “avian cognition” was considered an oxymoron. Avian social interaction was also seen as based on rigid, if sometimes complicated, patterns. The possible effect of social interaction on cognition, or vice versa, was therefore something almost never discussed. Two paradigm shifts—one (...)
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  11.  9
    “Birdbrains” Should Not Be Ignored in Studying the Evolution of G.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  12.  21
    Communicative Acts and Drug-Induced Feelings.Irene M. Pepperberg - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):659-660.
  13. Evolution of Avian Intelligence, With an Emphasis on Grey Parrots.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2002 - In Robert J. Sternberg & J. Kaufman (eds.), The Evolution of Intelligence. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 315.
     
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  14. Intelligence and Rationality in Parrots.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2006 - In Susan Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press.
  15.  15
    Language and Cognition: The Interesting Case of Subjects “P”.Irene M. Pepperberg - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):359-359.
  16. Lack of Referential Vocal Learning From LCD Video by Grey Parrots (Psittacus Erithacus).Irene M. Pepperberg & Steven R. Wilkes - 2004 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 5 (1):75-97.
    Grey parrots do not acquire referential English labels when tutored with videotapes displayed on CRT screens if socially isolated, reward for attempted labels is possible, trainers direct birds’ attention to the monitor, live video feed avoids habituation or one trainer repeats labels produced on video and rewards label attempts. Because birds learned referential labels from live tutor pairs in concurrent sessions, we concluded that video failed because input lacked live social interaction and modeling. Recent studies, however, suggest that standard CRT (...)
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  17.  25
    Nature/Nurture Reflux.Irene M. Pepperberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):645-646.
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  18.  21
    Out of the Mouths of Babes . . . And Beaks of Birds? A Broader Interpretation of the Frame/Content Theory for the Evolution of Speech Production. [REVIEW]Irene M. Pepperberg - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):526-527.
    Much of the material MacNeilage cites to support his frame/content theory for the evolution of speech production in humans is not unique to mammals. Parallels can be drawn for comparable evolution of vocal flexibility (specifically the reproduction of human speech) in birds. I describe several such parallels and conclude that MacNeilage's hypotheses may have broader application than he envisioned.
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  19.  24
    Research Scientist.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):636-636.
    Viewing communication as a dynamic system is laudable; arguing that the approach is novel is questionable. Some researchers studying nonhuman communication other than ape language have been using such an approach for decades. A brief description of an avian system provides one such example. Interestingly, the dynamic social system described in the target article may have a developmental neuronal basis.
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  20.  13
    Studying Numerical Competence: A Trip Through Linguistic Wonderland?Irene M. Pepperberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):595-596.
  21.  8
    Sensitive Periods, Social Interaction, and Song Acquisition: The Dialectics of Dialects?Irene M. Pepperberg - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):756-757.
  22.  58
    The Conundrum of Correlation and Causation.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1073-1074.
    Biology can inspire robotic simulations of behavior and thus advance robotics, but the validity of drawing conclusions about real behavior from robotic models is questionable. Robotic models, particularly of learning, do not account, for example, for (a) exaptation: co-opting of previously evolved functions for new behavior, (b) learning through observation, (c) complex biological reality, or (d) limits on computational capacity.
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  23.  4
    The Comparative Psychology of Intelligence: Some Thirty Years Later.Irene M. Pepperberg - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  24.  28
    To See or Not to See, That is the Question: Designing Experiments to Test Perspective-Taking in Nonhumans.Irene M. Pepperberg - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):128-129.
    Heyes argues that we need alternative experiments to study those animal abilities generally considered to involve “theory of mind.” The studies she proposes, however, have as many problems as those that she criticizes. Further interactions should exist among researchers examining these capacities before additional experiments are undertaken.
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