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  1.  11
    Mutati Artus: Scylla, Philomela and the End of Silenus' Song in Virgil Eclogue 6.Irene Peirano - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (1):187-.
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    Ille Ego Qui Quondam: On Authorial (an) Onymity.Irene Peirano - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 251.
    The name heading a text signifies a pledge of responsibility for the content. Even when the author is not part of the narrative proper, references to his/her name do more than supply factual information. Though ultimately the author is only what readers make him/her to be, s/he is nevertheless a powerful and important figure of reading or understanding that is activated to some extent in all texts. Thus the author’s name is as much part of a text and of our (...)
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  3.  12
    Non Subripiendi Causa Sed Palam Mutuandi: Intertextuality and Literary Deviancy Between Law, Rhetoric, and Literature in Roman Imperial Culture.Irene Peirano - 2013 - American Journal of Philology 134 (1):83-100.
    This article explores the use of imagery drawn from the legal sphere to describe intertextual relations in Roman culture, drawing attention to the interconnected nature of contemporary debates on ownership and private property in law and literary criticism. Taking as my starting point a remark by Seneca the Elder on Ovid’s “borrowing” of Virgil’s text, I show how the distinction often invoked between legitimate imitation and literary theft is explained by a deep-seated and multi-faceted analogy between literary and legal judgment. (...)
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