Results for 'Ishtar, Avid'

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  1.  38
    Towards a History From Antiquity to the Renaissance of Sundials and Other Instruments for Reckoning Time by the Sun and Stars H ESTER H IGTON, Sundials—An Illustrated History of Portable Dials. London: Philip Wilson, 2001. Reviewed by D AVID A. K ING, Institute for the History of Science, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, D‐60054 Frankfurt Am Main, Germany H ESTER H IGTON, with Contributions From S ILKE A CKERMANN, R ICHARD D UNN, K IYOSHI T AKADA and A NTHONY T URNER, Sundials at Greenwich—A Catalogue of the Sundials, Horary Quadrants and Nocturnals in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Oxford: Oxford University Press, and Greenwich: National Maritime Museum, 2002. [REVIEW]D. Avid Ak Ing - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (3):375-388.
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  2.  4
    Lipit-Ishtar's Hall of Justice. Lipit-Ishtar & Ferris J. Stephens - 1950 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (3):179.
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  3.  14
    D avid L ivingstone S mith , How Biology Shapes Philosophy: New Foundations for Naturalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017, xiv + 351 pp., £78.99. [REVIEW]Shane N. Glackin - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):17.
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  4.  55
    D Avid B Ostock . Philosophy of Mathematics: An Introduction.James Robert Brown - 2010 - Philosophia Mathematica 18 (1):127-129.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  5.  26
    From Ishtar to Aphrodite.Miroslav Marcovich - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 30 (2):43.
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  6.  9
    D AVID A. K ING, The Ciphers of the Monks: A Forgotten Number-Notation of the Middle Ages. Boethius, 44. Stuttgart: FranzSteiner Verlag, 2001. Pp. 506. ISBN 3-515-07640-9. DM 199.49, €102.00. [REVIEW]Catherine Eagleton - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Science 38 (3):359-360.
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  7.  4
    Avid Carr's "Phenomenology and the Problem of History". [REVIEW]Sang-ki Kim - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (4):578.
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  8.  7
    The Enigmatic Oxygen-Avid Hemoglobin ofAscaris.Daniel E. Goldberg - 1995 - Bioessays 17 (2):177-182.
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  9.  4
    Avid Bell's "Frege's Theory of Judgment". [REVIEW]Newton Garver - 1980 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (4):598.
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  10.  2
    D AVID K NIGHT , The Evolution Debate 1813–1870. London and New York: Routledge in Association with the Natural History Museum, 2003. Pp. 3748. ISBN 0-415-28922-X . £895.00. [REVIEW]Peter Bowler - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Science 39 (1):140-141.
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  11.  1
    A New Inscription Of Libit-Ishtar.George A. Barton - 1925 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 45:154-155.
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  12. On the Etymology of Ishtar.George A. Barton - 1911 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 31 (4):355-358.
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  13. Avid Novak's "Suicide and Morality". [REVIEW]Henry Johnstone - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (2):276.
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  14.  40
    In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  15. Closing 'the Gap'on Indigenous Health?Zohl dé Ishtar - 2008 - Nexus 20 (3):15.
     
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  16.  80
    Population Genetics and Population Thinking: Mathematics and the Role of the Individual.Margaret Morrison - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1189-1200.
    Ernst Mayr has criticised the methodology of population genetics for being essentialist: interested only in “types” as opposed to individuals. In fact, he goes so far as to claim that “he who does not understand the uniqueness of individuals is unable to understand the working of natural selection” (1982, 47). This is a strong claim indeed especially since many responsible for the development of population genetics (especially Fisher, Haldane, and Wright) were avid Darwinians. In order to unravel this apparent (...)
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  17. Baring the Brain as Well as the Soul: Milan Kundera's the Joke.Yvonne Howell - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 201-217.
    Milan Kundera's first major novel, The Joke, was written in 1961-1965, before he made the decision to leave Czechoslovakia and take up residency as a political exile in France.1 With a few noteworthy exceptions, critics of the work focused on its political message in a Cold War context. This was easy to do: its plot revolves around an avid young Czech communist (Ludvik), who writes an ironic postcard to his overly earnest girlfriend while she is away at a political (...)
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  18.  23
    Political Theory for Mortals: Shades of Justice and Images of Death. [REVIEW]Tim Dare - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):189-191.
    John Seery begins his book with a stirring condemnation of current political theory. He was attracted to the discipline, he reports, because it promised more than a life of idle speculation and disinterested contemplation. Though ensconced in academe, political theorists "at least have one foot out the door." However, political theory has lost its connection to the real world. Much current writing is predictable and formulaic, too much time is spent scoring points, establishing professional authority, and promoting career options: "The (...)
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  19.  10
    Investigating the “Science” in “Eastern Religions”: A Methodological Inquiry.Ankur Barua - 2017 - Zygon 52 (1):124-145.
    This article explores some of the understandings of “science” that are often employed in the literature on “science and Eastern religions.” These understandings crucially shape the raging debates between the avid proponents and the keen detractors of the thesis that Eastern forms of spirituality are uniquely able to subsume the sciences into their metaphysical–axiological horizons. More specifically, the author discusses some of the proposed relations between “science” and “Eastern religions” by highlighting three themes: the relation between science and metaphysics, (...)
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  20.  42
    A Quantum-Information-Theoretic Complement to a General-Relativistic Implementation of a Beyond-Turing Computer.Christian Wüthrich - 2015 - Synthese 192 (7):1989-2008.
    There exists a growing literature on the so-called physical Church-Turing thesis in a relativistic spacetime setting. The physical Church-Turing thesis is the conjecture that no computing device that is physically realizable can exceed the computational barriers of a Turing machine. By suggesting a concrete implementation of a beyond-Turing computer in a spacetime setting, Istvan Nemeti and Gyula David have shown how an appreciation of the physical Church-Turing thesis necessitates the confluence of mathematical, computational, physical, and indeed cosmological ideas. In this (...)
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  21.  8
    The Genome as the Biological Unconscious – and the Unconscious as the Psychic 'Genome': A Psychoanalytical Rereading of Molecular Genetics.Hub Zwart - 2013 - Cosmos and History 9 (2):198-222.
    1900 was a remarkable year for science. Several ground-breaking events took place, in physics, biology and psychology. Planck introduced the quantum concept, the work of Mendel was rediscovered, and Sigmund Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams . These events heralded the emergence of completely new areas of inquiry, all of which greatly affected the intellectual landscape of the 20 th century, namely quantum physics, genetics and psychoanalysis. What do these developments have in common? Can we discern a family likeness, a (...)
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  22.  91
    “Book Review: Culture and Liberty: Writings of Isabel Paterson“. [REVIEW]Linda Royster Beito - unknown
    Stephen Cox writes of the complexities that guided this well-known columnist, literary critic, best-selling novelist, avid reader, and intellectual, Mary Isabel Bowler Patterson, better known as Isabel Paterson or “I.M.P.” This edited collection includes a well-chosen selection of her essays, reviews, and letters. Combining both formal and colloquial prose, Paterson’s writings incorporated quips about such people as Sinclair Lewis and Henry David Thoreau, as well as candid discussions of William F. Buckley, Jr., Buffalo Bill, and Cecil Rhodes. The more (...)
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  23.  4
    Novels in the Everyday: An Aesthetic Investigation.Kalle Puolakka - 2019 - Estetika 56 (2):206-222.
    Everyday aestheticians have had relatively little to say about literature. Inspired by Peter Kivy’s philosophy of literature as laid out in his books The Performance of Reading and Once-Told Tales, I examine reading literature as a part of everyday life. I argue that not only do Kivy’s views help explain the value that avid readers place on their daily silent engagement with a book, but that his philosophy of literature also shows how literary works can have an aesthetic presence (...)
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  24.  17
    Die Künftige Generation: Helene Stöcker's Future (From Malthus to Nietzsche).Penelope Deutscher - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):18-35.
    An avid reader of Nietzsche, the German radical feminist Helene Stöcker referred in 1893 to the Verfrühung of the modern woman, her prematurity. She used references to Mill, Bebel, Darwin, Galton, and Nietzsche among others to develop a concept of women's untimely modernity. This paper considers how a number of concepts of time, transformation, biological futurity, and putative agency over nature became, for Stöcker, the basis for a feminist claim to autonomy, agency, and reproductive rights. The paper goes on (...)
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  25.  77
    On Rorty's Evangelical Metaphilosophy.David Rondel - 2011 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (2):150-170.
    I have spent 40 years looking for a coherent and convincing way of formulating my worries about what, if anything, philosophy is good for.Richard Rorty had an unusually avid interest in metaphilosophy. Again and again he would return to questions about the practical uses (if any) to which philosophy might be put, about philosophy's role in intellectual culture, about what philosophy is or might become. His answers to these questions were famously negative: philosophy's practical uses are few, its cultural (...)
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  26. In the Beginning Was the Word and Then Four Revolutions in the History of Information.Anthony F. Beavers - unknown
    In the beginning was the word, or grunt, or groan, or signal of some sort. This, however, hardly qualifies as an information revolution, at least in any standard technological sense. Nature is replete with meaningful signs, and we must imagine that our early ancestors noticed natural patterns that helped to determine when to sow and when to reap, which animal tracks to follow, what to eat, and so forth. Spoken words at first must have been meaningful in some similar sense. (...)
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  27.  1
    Reflections on Digestions and Other Corporealities in Artists’ Books.Amanda Couch - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-13.
    With an avid attention to the valuing of embodiment and a championing of the re-emergence of the body as site for discussions of knowledge and knowing, this essay shares aspects of my practice that engage a performative, haptic, situated engagement with the body through the artist’s book. The motivation for the creation of my bookworks was an interest in manifesting situated knowing and embodied ways of becoming. Engaging form, materiality, and bodily history, my artists’ books explore the processes and (...)
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  28.  23
    Medicine in John Locke's Philosophy.Miguel A. Sanchez-Gonzalez - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (6):675-695.
    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his “plain historical method”; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of (...)
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  29.  30
    Philosophy and Science in the Social Theory of the Frankfurt School.Halina Walentowicz & Maciej Bańkowski - 2009 - Dialogue and Universalism 19 (3-5):209-225.
    The present essay focuses on the Frankfurt School’s views on relations between philosophy and science. The author specifically concentrates on Horkheimer, the School’s leader, and Habermas, its most prominent contemporary representative. In her reconstruction of the Frankfurt School’s approach to the dependencies between philosophy and science the author—similarly to the Frankfurt theoreticians—abstains from treating it abstractly, instead placing it in its social and historiosophical context. The essay’s leading thesis is that the Frankfurt School sees philosophical self-reflection as a remedy for (...)
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  30.  45
    THIS IS NICE OF YOU. Introduction by Ben Segal.Gary Lutz - 2011 - Continent 1 (1):43-51.
    Reproduced with the kind permission of the author. Currently available in the collection I Looked Alive . © 2010 The Brooklyn Rail/Black Square Editions | ISBN 978-1934029-07-7 Originally published 2003 Four Walls Eight Windows. continent. 1.1 (2011): 43-51. Introduction Ben Segal What interests me is instigated language, language dishabituated from its ordinary doings, language startled by itself. I don't know where that sort of interest locates me, or leaves me, but a lot of the books I see in the stores (...)
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  31.  80
    Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid (...)
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  32.  15
    Technology Transfer and Cultural Exchange: Western Scientists and Engineers Encounter Late Tokugawa and Meiji Japan.G. Gooday & M. Low - unknown
    [FIRST PARAGRAPH] During the last decade of the nineteenth century, the Engineer was only one of many British and American publications that took an avid interest in the rapid rise of Japan to the status of a fully industrialized imperial power on a par with major European nations. In December 1897 this journal published a photographic montage of "Pioneers of Modem Engineering Education in Japan" (Figure I), showing a selection of the Japanese and Western teachers who had worked to (...)
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  33.  60
    The Plain Truth: Descartes, HUET, and Skepticism (Review).Keith Fennen - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 106-107.
    Thomas Lennon’s book is an important contribution to Descartes scholarship in that it systematically challenges the standard interpretation of the Meditations, i.e., that Descartes sought to refute skepticism and failed, arguing instead that a notion of intellectual integrity rests at the root of Descartes’s thought. All the while, these aims are accomplished through an analysis of the Censura philosophiae cartesianae by Pierre-Daniel Huet, a skeptic and fierce critic of Descartes.Beyond introducing Huet and his relationship to Cartesians like Pierre-Sylvain Regis and (...)
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  34.  8
    Reading Aristotle Through Rome.Cary J. Nederman & Mary Elizabeth Sullivan - 2008 - European Journal of Political Theory 7 (2):223-240.
    In recent years, scholars have begun to give greater attention to the 14th-century political writer, Ptolemy of Lucca, mostly on account of his avid defense of republican government in the treatise, De regimine principum. Educated in the scholastic curriculum at the University of Paris, Ptolemy has typically been identified by scholars as one of the most thoroughly Aristotelian medieval thinkers. Ptolemy, like many of his contemporaries, peppered his writing with citations from Aristotle's major works. This article, however, examines the (...)
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  35.  7
    Literary Criticism and Its Discontents.Geoffrey Hartman - 1976 - Critical Inquiry 3 (2):203-220.
    Literary criticism is neither more nor less important today than it has been since the becoming an accepted activity in the Renaissance. The humanists of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries created the institution of criticism as we know it: the recovery and analysis of works of art. They printed, edited, and interpreted texts that dated from antiquity and which had been lost or disheveled. Evangelical in their fervor, avid in their search for lost or buried riches, they also put (...)
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  36.  9
    Henry More as Reader of Marcus Aurelius.John Sellars - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (5):916-931.
    I examine Henry More’s engagement with Stoicism in general, and Marcus Aurelius in particular, in his Enchiridion Ethicum. More quotes from Marcus’ Meditations throughout the Enchiridion, leading one commentator to note that More ‘mined the Meditations’ when writing his book. Yet More’s general attitude towards Stoicism is more often than not critical, especially when it comes to the passions. I shall argue that while More was clearly an avid reader of the Meditations, he read Marcus not as a Stoic (...)
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  37.  28
    Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.Anthony J. Cascardi & Denis Dutton - unknown
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid (...)
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  38.  17
    Five or Seven Recesses?P. Walcot - 1965 - Classical Quarterly 15 (01):79-.
    IN C.Q. N.S. xiii , 1578ff., M. L. West discusses various non-Greek traditions which throw light on the interpretation of Pherecydes. Of course problems remain, but one of these the comparative material may yet solve. Is West correct in suggesting that we emend the Suda entry on Pherecydesand so reduce the seven recesses to five ? A convincing analogy can help us here. G. S. Kirk has already compared the seven gates which Ishtar has to penetrate when she descends into (...)
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  39.  14
    The Politics of Human Nature.Paul Gottfried - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):828-829.
    Thomas Fleming is an erudite political philosopher with a flair for language. Almost every page of his book on human nature includes colorful distillations of legal, ethical, and biological concepts drawn from a lifetime of study. Fleming also pokes fun at pompous naïfs: for example, when he observes that historians "like Philipe Aries and Lawrence Stone are forever discovering that some aspect of family life--conjugal intimacy or affection for children--was invented during the sixteenth or seventeenth century." From such playful phrases (...)
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  40.  13
    The Great Mother Domesticated: Sexual Difference and Sexual Indifference in D. W. Griffith's "Intolerance".Michael Rogin - 1989 - Critical Inquiry 15 (3):510-555.
    A giant statue of the mother goddess, Ishtar, presides over Intolerance , the movie D. W. Griffith made after his triumph with The Birth of a Nation . Ishtar sits above Babylon’s royal, interior court, but the court itself is constructed on so gigantic a scale that is diminishes the size of the goddess. Perhaps to establish Ishtar’s larger-than-life proportions, Griffith posed himself alongside her in a production still from the movie . The director is the same size as the (...)
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  41.  5
    Wittgenstein in Recent French Poetics: Henri Meschonnic and Jacques Roubaud.Maria Rusanda Muresan - 2011 - Paragraph 34 (3):423-440.
    Two recent French poets, Henri Meschonnic and Jacques Roubaud, have found in Wittgenstein's philosophy an alternative to post-structuralist poetics. Meschonnic's poetry and his theoretical writings show a sustained critical engagement with Wittgenstein, whom he reads in conjunction with Emile Benveniste. The writers inform his theory of poetic rhythm and his practice of biblical translation. Roubaud's use of Wittgenstein, by contrast, here examined in the collection Quelque chose noir, is linked partly with the poet's grief following the death of his wife (...)
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  42.  10
    The Rise of American Philosophy: Cambridge, 1860-1930. [REVIEW]B. R. S. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (4):678-679.
    Kuklick traces the history of philosophic thought in the United States "as typified and dominated by Harvard" from 1860 to 1930. He provides an analysis both of the thought of this period and of the development of Harvard University and its philosophy department. These two types of analyses are interwoven throughout the book, for Kuklick finds that the second type provides an important key to the interpretation that unfolds within the first type. Among the philosophers included are Francis Bowen, Chauncey (...)
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  43.  18
    The Familiar and the Strange: Western Travelers' Maps of Europe and Asia, Ca. 1600-1800.Jordana Dym - 2004 - Philosophy and Geography 7 (2):155 – 191.
    Early Modern European travelers sought to gather and disseminate knowledge through narratives written for avid publishers and public. Yet not all travelers used the same tools to inform their readers. Despite a shared interest in conveying new knowledge based on eyewitness authority, Grand Tour accounts differed in an important respect from travelogues about Asia: they were less likely to include maps until the late eighteenth century. This paper examines why, using travel accounts published between 1600 and 1800 about Italy (...)
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  44.  19
    An Indigenous Lens Into Comparative Law: The Doctrine of Discovery in the United States and New Zealand.Robert J. Miller & Jacinta Ruru - manuscript
    North America and New Zealand were colonized by England under an international legal principle that is known today as the Doctrine of Discovery. When Europeans set out to explore and exploit new lands in the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries, they justified their sovereign and property claims over these territories and the Indigenous people with the Discovery Doctrine. This legal principle was justified by religious and ethnocentric ideas of European and Christian superiority over the other cultures, religions, and races of (...)
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  45.  6
    Deceit Around the U.S. House of Representatives’ Katyn Committee.Witold Wasilewski - 2011 - Dialogue and Universalism 21 (3):113-135.
    In 1951–1952 a selected committee appointed by the US Congress investigated the circumstances of the so-called Katyn Crime. The reasons why the highest US legislative body undertook the issue hale to be sought in the international situation of the day, which was determined by the Korean War.The “Katyn Committee” was called up on September 18, 1951 by the House of Representatives of the 82nd Congress on the strength of Resolution 390. Sitting on it were Daniel L. Flood, Thaddeus M. Machrowicz, (...)
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  46. To Test a Powerful Computer, Play an Ancient Game.George Johnson - manuscript
    While there are avid chess players in Japan, China, Korea and throughout the East, far more popular is the deceptively simple game of Go, in which black and white pieces called stones are used to form intricate, interlocking patterns that sprawl across the board. So subtle and beautiful is this ancient game that, to hear aficionados describe it, Go is to chess what Asian martial arts like aikido are to a boxing match.
     
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  47.  4
    A New Translation Of Cuneiform Laws. [REVIEW]Reuven Yaron - 1998 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 118 (1):29-35.
    This review-article of Martha Roth's Law Collections focuses on selected sections in the Laws of Ur-Namma, Eshnunna, Hammurabi, Lipit-Ishtar, and the Neo-Babylonian Laws. It discusses potentially misleading divisions of sections and problems of rendering the term awīlum (lú). It also asserts that students of law will benefit from Roth's translations for generations.
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  48. Reflections on Digestions and Other Corporealities in Artists’ Books.Amanda Couch - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-13.
    With an avid attention to the valuing of embodiment and a championing of the re-emergence of the body as site for discussions of knowledge and knowing, this essay shares aspects of my practice that engage a performative, haptic, situated engagement with the body through the artist’s book. The motivation for the creation of my bookworks was an interest in manifesting situated knowing and embodied ways of becoming. Engaging form, materiality, and bodily history, my artists’ books explore the processes and (...)
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  49. Reflections on Digestions and Other Corporealities in Artists’ Books.Amanda Couch - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-13.
    With an avid attention to the valuing of embodiment and a championing of the re-emergence of the body as site for discussions of knowledge and knowing, this essay shares aspects of my practice that engage a performative, haptic, situated engagement with the body through the artist’s book. The motivation for the creation of my bookworks was an interest in manifesting situated knowing and embodied ways of becoming. Engaging form, materiality, and bodily history, my artists’ books explore the processes and (...)
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  50. Finding Wisdom in East Asian Classics.Wm Theodore de Bary (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    _Finding Wisdom in East Asian Classics_ is an essential, all-access guide to the core texts of East Asian civilization and culture. Essays address frequently read, foundational texts in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese, as well as early modern fictional classics and nonfiction works of the seventeenth century. Building strong links between these writings and the critical traditions of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism, this volume shows the vital role of the classics in the shaping of Asian history and in the development (...)
     
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