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  1.  16
    Steven M. Oberhelman: Rhetoric and Homiletics in Fourth-Century Christian Literature. Prose Rhythm, Oratorical Style, and Preaching in the Works of Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine. (American Philological Association: American Classical Studies, 26.) Pp. V + 199; 4 Tables. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1991. $29.95 (Paper, $19.95). [REVIEW]Ivor J. Davidson - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):450-.
  2.  7
    The Vita Beata.Ivor J. Davidson - 1996 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 63:199-219.
    In his Sermo 150, Augustine argues that the desire to attain the vita beata has been the motivation for all types of philosophy, and that it is also the reason that people would give if asked why they became Christians; the quest is common to all human beings, whether good or evil. Appetitio...beatae vitae philosophis Christianisque communis est.The truth of Augustine’s claims is illustrated in a variety of Latin Christian works from the fourth century, which take up the traditional philosophical (...)
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  3. Ambrose: De Officiis: Edited with an Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (Two Volume Set).Ivor J. Davidson (ed.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    The De officiis of Ambrose of Milan (c. 339-397) is one of the most important texts of Latin Patristic literature. Modelled on the De Officiis of Cicero, it sets out Ambrose's ethical vision for his clergy, synthesizing ancient Stoic assumptions on virtue and expediency with Biblical patterns of humility, charity, and self-denial to present a paradigm of a church hierarchy capable of making the right impact on its social world. Ambrose aspires to demonstrate that the age of profound principles is (...)
     
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