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  1.  18
    Queering Girard—De-Freuding Butler: A Theoretical Encounter Between Judith Butler's Gender Performativity and René Girard's Mimetic Theory.Iwona Janicka - 2015 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 22:43-64.
    This article attempts to respond to the fractional presence of feminist discourse around René Girard’s theory of mimetic desire. I will first briefly examine the relevant critical stands on mimesis and then proceed to rehabilitate it for feminism via an analysis of Judith Butler’s theory of performative gender. By bringing together selected aspects of Girard and Butler’s work, it will be possible to build a constructive dialogue between the two thinkers. Due to the scope of the paper I will not (...)
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  2.  3
    Hegel on a Carrousel: Universality and the Politics of Translation in the Work of Judith Butler.Iwona Janicka - 2013 - Paragraph 36 (3):361-375.
    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it aims to confront Hegel's ideas on the interaction between universality, particularity and singularity with those of Butler and to show that Butler's universal is dynamic and infinitely self-renewing. Second, it aims to engage with Butler's politics of translation and to demonstrate how a Levinasian perspective on Hegelian dialectics changes the functioning of the universal. In relation to this claim, the article will also demonstrate how the structural failure in translation and performativity (...)
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  3. A New Way to Suffer: Girard, Rancière, and Political Subjectification.Iwona Janicka - 2019 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 26 (1):161-177.
    The question of politics is underdeveloped in René Girard's mimetic theory. This can be fairly easily accounted for. First, mimesis is essentially an ethical mechanism. In Girard, it pertains both to a set of moral prescriptions and to an ethos, understood here as a way of being that exchanges harmful repetitions for favorable ones.1 Throughout his work, Girard advances an ethics of generosity that steers clear of reciprocity, which, in his framework, would lead to violence.2 Second, Girard concentrates on social (...)
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