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  1.  17
    Who Did Forbid Suicide at Phaedo 62b?J. C. G. Strachan - 1970 - Classical Quarterly 20 (02):216-.
    In his discussion of the ethics of suicide Plato alludes to more than one traditional injunction against it:indicates a fairly general acceptance of its wickedness. Cebes has heard the Pythagorean Philolaus, among others, saying that suicide was immoral, but has gathered no satisfactory explanation as to why this should be so. One reason, impressive, but, Socrates admits, difficult is to be found.
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  2. Who Did Forbid Suicide at Phaedo 62b?1.J. C. G. Strachan - 1970 - Classical Quarterly 20 (2):216-220.
    In his discussion of the ethics of suicide Plato alludes to more than one traditional injunction against it:indicates a fairly general acceptance of its wickedness. Cebes has heard the Pythagorean Philolaus, among others, saying that suicide was immoral, but has gathered no satisfactory explanation as to why this should be so. One reason, impressive, but, Socrates admits, difficult is to be found.
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    L. Catilina Legatus: Sallust, Histories I. 46M.A. Keaveney & J. C. G. Strachan - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (02):363-.
    As Fragment 46 of the first book of Sallust's Histories Maurenbrecher prints: Magnis operibus perfectis obsidium cepit per L. Catilinam legatum. This he takes in effect to mean that Lucretius Ofella after the completion of great siege works received reinforcements brought by L. Catiline legate of Sulla. The interpretation depends largely upon his contention that the phrase obsidium cepit is to be taken as equivalent to subsidium cepit, for which he claims the authority, ultimately, of Verrius Flaccus as represented by (...)
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  4. Plato Opera Volume I: Euthyphro, Apologia, Crito, Phaedo, Cratylus, Theaetetus,Sophista, Politicus.E. A. Duke, W. F. Hicken, W. S. M. Nicoll, D. B. Robinson & J. C. G. Strachan (eds.) - 1995 - Clarendon Press.
    Plato is one of the key ancient authors studied by both classicists and philosophers. This long-awaited new edition contains seven of the dialogues of Plato, and is the first in the five-volume complete edition of his works in the Oxford Classical Texts series. The result of many years of painstaking scholarship, the new volume will replace the now nearly 100 year old original edition, and is destined to become just as long-lasting a classic.
     
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