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Jack Copeland [20]John W. Copeland [6]J. Copeland [2]J. B. Copeland [1]
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  1. The Inconceivable Popularity of Conceivability Arguments.Douglas I. Campbell, Jack Copeland & Zhuo-Ran Deng - 2017 - Philosophical Quarterly 67 (267):223-240.
    Famous examples of conceivability arguments include (i) Descartes’ argument for mind-body dualism, (ii) Kripke's ‘modal argument’ against psychophysical identity theory, (iii) Chalmers’ ‘zombie argument’ against materialism, and (iv) modal versions of the ontological argument for theism. In this paper, we show that for any such conceivability argument, C, there is a corresponding ‘mirror argument’, M. M is deductively valid and has a conclusion that contradicts C's conclusion. Hence, a proponent of C—henceforth, a ‘conceivabilist’—can be warranted in holding that C's premises (...)
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  2. Artificial Intelligence: A Philosophical Introduction.Jack Copeland - 1993 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Presupposing no familiarity with the technical concepts of either philosophy or computing, this clear introduction reviews the progress made in AI since the inception of the field in 1956. Copeland goes on to analyze what those working in AI must achieve before they can claim to have built a thinking machine and appraises their prospects of succeeding. There are clear introductions to connectionism and to the language of thought hypothesis which weave together material from philosophy, artificial intelligence and neuroscience. John (...)
     
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  3. Even Turing Machines Can Compute Uncomputable Functions.Jack Copeland - unknown
    Accelerated Turing machines are Turing machines that perform tasks commonly regarded as impossible, such as computing the halting function. The existence of these notional machines has obvious implications concerning the theoretical limits of computability.
     
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  4. The Broad Conception of Computation.Jack Copeland - 1997 - American Behavioral Scientist 40 (6):690-716.
    A myth has arisen concerning Turing's paper of 1936, namely that Turing set forth a fundamental principle concerning the limits of what can be computed by machine - a myth that has passed into cognitive science and the philosophy of mind, to wide and pernicious effect. This supposed principle, sometimes incorrectly termed the 'Church-Turing thesis', is the claim that the class of functions that can be computed by machines is identical to the class of functions that can be computed by (...)
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  5. Beyond the Universal Turing Machine.Jack Copeland - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):46-67.
    We describe an emerging field, that of nonclassical computability and nonclassical computing machinery. According to the nonclassicist, the set of well-defined computations is not exhausted by the computations that can be carried out by a Turing machine. We provide an overview of the field and a philosophical defence of its foundations.
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  6. Temporal Parts and Their Individuation.J. Copeland, H. Dyke & D. Proudfoot - 2001 - Analysis 61 (4):289-293.
    Ignoring the temporal dimension, an object such as a railway tunnel or a human body is a three-dimensional whole composed of three-dimensional parts. The four-dimensionalist holds that a physical object exhibiting identity across time—Descartes, for example—is a four-dimensional whole composed of 'briefer' four-dimensional objects, its temporal parts. Peter van Inwagen (1990) has argued that four-dimensionalism cannot be sustained, or at best can be sustained only by a counterpart theorist. We argue that different schemes of individuation of temporal parts are available, (...)
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  7. Super Turing-Machines.Jack Copeland - 1998 - Complexity 4 (1):30-32.
    The tape is divided into squares, each square bearing a single symbol—'0' or '1', for example. This tape is the machine's general-purpose storage medium: the machine is set in motion with its input inscribed on the tape, output is written onto the tape by the head, and the tape serves as a short-term working memory for the results of intermediate steps of the computation. The program governing the particular computation that the machine is to perform is also stored on the (...)
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  8. Turing's o-Machines, Searle, Penrose, and the Brain.Jack Copeland - 1998 - Analysis 58 (2):128-138.
    In his PhD thesis (1938) Turing introduced what he described as 'a new kind of machine'. He called these 'O-machines'. The present paper employs Turing's concept against a number of currently fashionable positions in the philosophy of mind.
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  9.  96
    On Alan Turing's Anticipation of Connectionism.Jack Copeland - 1996 - Synthese 108 (3):361-377.
    It is not widely realised that Turing was probably the first person to consider building computing machines out of simple, neuron-like elements connected together into networks in a largely random manner. Turing called his networks unorganised machines. By the application of what he described as appropriate interference, mimicking education an unorganised machine can be trained to perform any task that a Turing machine can carry out, provided the number of neurons is sufficient. Turing proposed simulating both the behaviour of the (...)
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  10. The Essential Turing: Seminal Writings in Computing, Logic, Philosophy, Artificial Intelligence, and Artificial Life: Plus the Secrets of Enigma.Jack Copeland (ed.) - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
  11.  79
    Our Posthuman Future.Jack Copeland & Diane Proudfoot - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 57 (57):73-78.
  12. Logic and Reality.J. Copeland (ed.) - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  13. Logic and Reality: Essays on the Legacy of Arthur Prior.Jack Copeland - 2000 - Mind 109 (435):570-573.
     
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  14.  44
    Narrow Versus Wide Mechanism.Jack Copeland - 2002 - In Matthias Scheutz (ed.), Computationalism: New Directions. MIT Press. pp. 5-32.
  15.  71
    B. F. Skinner's Skepticism About Choices and Future Consequences.John W. Copeland - 1971 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (4):540-545.
  16. The Conjunction Fallacy.Jack Copeland & Diane Proudfoot - 2003 - Logique Et Analyse 46.
     
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  17. Turing, Wittgenstein, and the Science of the Mind.Jack Copeland - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (4):497-519.
  18. Logic and Reality: Essays on the Legacy of Arthur Prior.Jack Copeland - 1999 - Studia Logica 62 (3):445-448.
     
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  19.  11
    Between Past and Present: An Essay on History.John W. Copeland - 1959 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (4):546-547.
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  20.  10
    Philosophy Disguised as Science.John W. Copeland - 1964 - Philosophy of Science 31 (2):168-172.
  21.  4
    Bacterial Subversion of Host Cytoskeletal Machinery: Hijacking Formins and the Arp2/3 Complex.Dorothy Truong, John W. Copeland & John H. Brumell - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (7):687-696.
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  22. Tree Formulations of Tense Logic.Jack Copeland - manuscript
    The tense tree method extends Jeffrey’s well-known formulation of classical propositional logic to tense logic (Jeffrey 1991).1 Tense trees combine pure tense logic with features of Prior’s U-calculi (where ‘U’ is the earlier-than relation; see Prior 1967 and the Introduction to this volume). The tree method has a number of virtues: trees are well suited to computational applications; semantically, the tree systems presented here are no less illuminating than model theory; the metatheory associated with tree formulations is often more tractable (...)
     
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  23. Cyc: A Case Study in Ontological Engineering.J. B. Copeland - 1997 - Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 5.
     
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  24. Enigma Variations.Jack Copeland - unknown
    Fifty years ago this month[[June]], in the Computing Machine Laboratory at Manchester University, the world's first electronic stored-program computer performed its first calculation. The tiny program, stored on the face of a cathode ray tube, was just 17 instructions long. Electronic engineers Freddie Williams and Tom Kilburn built the Manchester computer in accordance with fundamental ideas explained to them by Max Newman, professor of mathematics at Manchester. The computer fell sideways out of research that nobody could have guessed would have (...)
     
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  25. Ludwig Wittgenstein's "Philosophical Investigations". [REVIEW]John W. Copeland - 1954 - Philosophical Forum 12:112.
  26. Préface.Jack Copeland, Didier Galmiche, Dominique Larchey-Wendling & Joseph Vidal-Rosset - 2012 - Philosophia Scientiae 16 (3):3-5.
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  27. Philosophy Research Paper Series - Dept Philosophy, University of Canterbury.Jack Copeland (ed.) - 1998
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  28.  57
    The Turing Guide.Jack Copeland, Jonathan Bowen, Robin Wilson & Mark Sprevak - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This volume celebrates the various facets of Alan Turing (1912–1954), the British mathematician and computing pioneer, widely considered as the father of computer science. It is aimed at the general reader, with additional notes and references for those who wish to explore the life and work of Turing more deeply. -/- The book is divided into eight parts, covering different aspects of Turing’s life and work. -/- Part I presents various biographical aspects of Turing, some from a personal point of (...)
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  29. The Promise of Modern Life: An Interrelational View.John W. Copeland - 1958 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (4):547-547.
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