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James Craig Hanks
Texas State University
  1.  49
    From Technological Autonomy to Technological Bluff: Jacques Ellul and Our Technological Condition.J. Craig Hanks & Emily Kay Hanks - 2015 - Human Affairs 25 (4):460-470.
    The work of Jacques Ellul is useful in understanding and evaluating the implications of rapidly changing technologies for human values and democracy. Ellul developed three powerful theses about technology: technological autonomy, technological determinism, and technological bluff. In this essay, the authors explicate these views of technology, and place the work of Ellul in dialogue with the ides of other important theorists of technology. Ellul’s too-often overlooked theses about technology are relevant to our present technological society.
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  2. Cities, Aesthetics, and Human Community: Some Thoughts on the Limits of Design.Peter Kroes, Pieter E. Vermaas, Andrew Light, Steven A. Moore & J. Craig Hanks - 2008 - In Pieter E. Vermaas, Peter Kroes, Andrew Light & Steven A. Moore (eds.), Philosophy and Design: From Engineering to Architecture. Springer.
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  3.  21
    Post-Analytic Philosophy.J. Craig Hanks - 1993 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 21 (65):37-40.
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  4.  19
    Wishing and Hoping: Some Thoughts on the Place of the Future in a Philosophy of the Present.J. Craig Hanks - 1999 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (2):25-28.
    In this essay I think about the ways in which orientation towards the future plays a central role in constituting meaningful lives. Much intellectual work on the nature of persons takes our existence as something given and static, and much of it treats persons as either isolated individuals, or as completely subsumed within a social identity. However, we are both, and neither; we are always individuals, and we are always social creatures, and yet we are never fully either of these. (...)
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  5.  12
    Fragmented Selves and Loss of Community.J. Craig Hanks - 1996 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (3):18-23.
    In this paper we try to provide the beginning of an analysis of some of the crises of our time. We do so by arguing that a certain account of the individual blocks our ability to think about solutions at the individual and the social levels. As an example we take the industrialization of housework in the United States and its effects on women’s identity and on notions of “home.” We suggest that the rise of liberal individualism, the industrialization of (...)
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    Wishing and Hoping: Some Thoughts on the Place of the Future in a Philosophy of the Present.J. Craig Hanks - 1999 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (2):25-28.
    In this essay I think about the ways in which orientation towards the future plays a central role in constituting meaningful lives. Much intellectual work on the nature of persons takes our existence as something given and static, and much of it treats persons as either isolated individuals, or as completely subsumed within a social identity. However, we are both, and neither; we are always individuals, and we are always social creatures, and yet we are never fully either of these. (...)
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