Results for 'J. Crick'

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  1. Molecular structure of nucleic acids : a structure for deoxyribose nucleic acid.J. D. Watson & F. H. C. Crick - 2014 - In Francisco José Ayala & John C. Avise (eds.), Essential readings in evolutionary biology. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  2. The Astonishing Hypothesis.Francis Crick & J. Clark - 1994 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (1):10-16.
    [opening paragraph] -- Clark: The `astonishing hypothesis' which you put forward in your book, and which you obviously feel is very controversial, is that `You, your joys and sorrows, your memories and ambitions, your sense of personal identity and free will are, in fact, no more than the behaviour of a vast assembly of nerve cells. As Lewis Carroll's Alice might have phrased it: `You're nothing but a pack of neurons'.' But it seems to me that this is not so (...)
     
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  3. Collard, J. 54 Comito, T. 198 Condor, J. 205n2 Condry, E. 87-8, 90, 91.J. Conrad, V. Crapanzano, M. Crick, J. Cripps, M. David, J. Derrida, N. B. Dirks, T. Docherty, N. Dorian & M. Douglas - 1997 - In Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.), After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge. pp. 264.
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  4. Cole, J. 87 Collard, J. 54 Comito, T. 198 Condor, J. 205n2.E. Condry, J. Conrad, V. Crapanzano, M. Crick, J. Cripps, M. David, J. Davis, J. Derrida, N. B. Dirks & T. Docherty - 1997 - In Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.), After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge.
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  5. Hiramatsu, M. 149 Hobsbawm, E. 242 Hockey, J. 186.G. Claxton, A. Cohen, A. P. Cohen, J. Cole, J. Collard, T. Comito, E. Condry, J. Conrad, V. Crapanzano & M. Crick - 1997 - In Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.), After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge. pp. 264.
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  6.  38
    Boekbespekingen.I. de la Potterie, I. de la Porterie, P. Smulders, P. Ploumen, P. Fransen, L. Monden, C. Sträter, J. Van Torre, P. Grootens, A. V. Kol, A. Snoeck, J. Rietmeyer, J. Mulders, J. De Munter, P. van Doornik, J. Crick, J. Rupert, R. Loyens, F. Malmberg, S. Trooster, R. Hostie, J. Nota, A. Poncelet, L. Vander Kerken, W. Couturier, P. de Bruin, L. Jansen, J. Peeters, A. De Pelsemaeker & A. Deblaere - 1955 - Bijdragen 16 (1):91-116.
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  7.  14
    Barnes, J.(1987) Early Greek Philosophy, London: Penguin Books. Blackburn, S.(1994) The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, Oxford, Oxford University Press. Blakemore, C. and Greenfield, S.(eds)(1987) Mindwaves. Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity and Consciousness, Oxford: Basil Blackwell. [REVIEW]P. S. Churchland, F. Crick & C. Koch - 1999 - In M. James C. Crabbe (ed.), From Soul to Self. Routledge. pp. 273--153.
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  8.  21
    Crick, F. 222.J. Currie, A. Damasio, J. Danckert, C. Darwin, A. S. David, M. Davies, B. Davis, J. Decety, R. C. DeCharmes & K. Delmeire - 2005 - In Helena De Preester & Veroniek Knockaert (eds.), Body Image and Body Schema. John Benjamins. pp. 329.
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  9.  37
    A World in One Dimension: Linus Pauling, Francis Crick and the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology.Bruno J. Strasser - 2006 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (4):491 - 512.
    In 1957, Francis Crick outlined a startling vision of life in which the great diversity of forms and shapes of macromolecules was encoded in the one-dimensional sequence of nucleic acids. This paper situates Crick's new vision in the debates of the 1950s about protein synthesis and gene action. After exploring the reception of Crick's ideas, it shows how they differed radically from a different model of protein synthesis which enjoyed wide currency in that decade. In this alternative (...)
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  10. Neuronal mechanisms of consciousness: A relational global workspace approach.Bernard J. Baars, J. B. Newman & John G. Taylor - 1998 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. pp. 269-278.
    This paper explores a remarkable convergence of ideas and evidence, previously presented in separate places by its authors. That convergence has now become so persuasive that we believe we are working within substantially the same broad framework. Taylor's mathematical papers on neuronal systems involved in consciousness dovetail well with work by Newman and Baars on the thalamocortical system, suggesting a brain mechanism much like the global workspace architecture developed by Baars (see references below). This architecture is relational, in the sense (...)
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  11.  42
    Cleeremans, A. 282 Cotman, CW 229 Creary, LG 59 f.(n. 16), 70 (n. 26) Crick, F. 227 Crow, TJ 233.A. A. Abrahamsen, D. M. Armstrong, V. H. Auerbach, R. Avenarius, F. J. Ayala, Ke Von Baer, D. A. Bantz, H. Barlow, E. Buchner & T. Burge - 1992 - In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Essays on the Prospects of Nonreductive Physicalism. New York: W. de Gruyter.
  12. The role of primordial emotions in the evolutionary origin of consciousness.D. A. Denton, M. J. McKinley, M. Farrell & G. F. Egan - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):500-514.
    Primordial emotions are the subjective element of the instincts which are the genetically programmed behaviour patterns which contrive homeostasis. They include thirst, hunger for air, hunger for food, pain and hunger for specific minerals etc.There are two constituents of a primordial emotion—the specific sensation which when severe may be imperious, and the compelling intention for gratification by a consummatory act. They may dominate the stream of consciousness, and can have plenipotentiary power over behaviour.It is hypothesized that early in animal evolution (...)
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  13.  14
    After the Double Helix.Angela N. H. Creager & Gregory J. Morgan - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):239-272.
    ABSTRACT Rosalind Franklin is best known for her informative X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA that provided vital clues for James Watson and Francis Crick's double-stranded helical model. Her scientific career did not end when she left the DNA work at King's College, however. In 1953 Franklin moved to J. D. Bernal's crystallography laboratory at Birkbeck College, where she shifted her focus to the three-dimensional structure of viruses, obtaining diffraction patterns of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) of unprecedented detail and clarity. (...)
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  14.  12
    After the Double Helix.Angela N. H. Creager & Gregory J. Morgan - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):239-272.
    ABSTRACT Rosalind Franklin is best known for her informative X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA that provided vital clues for James Watson and Francis Crick's double-stranded helical model. Her scientific career did not end when she left the DNA work at King's College, however. In 1953 Franklin moved to J. D. Bernal's crystallography laboratory at Birkbeck College, where she shifted her focus to the three-dimensional structure of viruses, obtaining diffraction patterns of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) of unprecedented detail and clarity. (...)
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  15.  2
    BOSWELL, J., Community and the Economy. The theory ofpublic co-operation, prólogo de Bernard Crick, Routledge, London, 1990, 226 págs. [REVIEW]Carlos Ortiz de Landázuri - 1994 - Anuario Filosófico:187-188.
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  16.  2
    In Defence of Politics.Bernard Crick - 2000 - A&C Black.
    A landmark work in which one of the UK's leading political writers makes a passionate defence of the importance of political debate to modern democracy.
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  17. Freedom as politics.Bernard Crick - 1967 - In Peter Laslett (ed.), Philosophy, politics and society, third series: a collection. Oxford,: Blackwell.
     
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  18.  15
    The decline of political thinking in British public life.Bernard Crick - 1998 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (1):102-120.
    Thirty years ago political philosophy in Britain was feared to be dead or dying; dying of meaninglessness and neglect.’ Political philosophy now enjoys a golden age, certainly in the English‐speaking world; but never has the level of political debate been lower. The memories are still painful of how, in the American presidential campaign of 1996 and the British general election of 1997, even sustained rhetoric, let alone attempts at reasoned, persuasive discourse, finally collapsed into sound‐bytes, and contingent sound‐bytes at that, (...)
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  19.  3
    The keys of power: the rhetoric and politics of transcendentalism.Nathan Crick - 2017 - [Columbia, South Carolina]: The University of South Carolina Press.
    Examines transcendentalism as a distinct rhetorical genre concerned primarily and self-consciously with questions of power.
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  20. The Astonishing Hypothesis: The Scientific Search for the Soul.Francis Crick - 1994 - Scribners.
    [opening paragraph] -- Clark: The `astonishing hypothesis' which you put forward in your book, and which you obviously feel is very controversial, is that `You, your joys and sorrows, your memories and ambitions, your sense of personal identity and free will are, in fact, no more than the behaviour of a vast assembly of nerve cells. As Lewis Carroll's Alice might have phrased it: `You're nothing but a pack of neurons'.' But it seems to me that this is not so (...)
  21. Toward a neurobiological theory of consciousness.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1990 - Seminars in the Neurosciences 2:263-275.
  22. A framework for consciousness.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 2003 - Nature Neuroscience 6:119-26.
  23.  95
    Are we aware of neural activity in primary visual cortex.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1995 - Nature 375:121-23.
  24. The Astonishing Hypothesis.Francis Crick - 1994 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 37:267.
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  25. Consciousness and neuroscience.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1998 - Cerebral Cortex.
  26.  24
    Of molecules and men.Francis Crick - 1966 - Seattle,: University of Washington Press.
    "In his third lecture Crick anticipates events and trends that have in fact come to pass in the past four decades, including the increasing use of computer technology and robotics in mind-brain research, explorations into right-side versus left-side uses of the brain, and controversies surrounding the existence of the soul."--BOOK JACKET.
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  27.  13
    In Defence of Politics.Graeme C. Moodie & Bernard Crick - 1964 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):380.
  28. Functions of the thalamic reticular complex: The searchlight hypothesis.Francis Crick - 1984 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 81:4586-93.
  29. Special sciences (or: The disunity of science as a working hypothesis).J. A. Fodor - 1974 - Synthese 28 (2):97-115.
  30. The Unconscious Homunculus.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 2000 - In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 3-11.
  31.  24
    Logical Pluralism.J. C. Beall & Greg Restall - 2005 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press. Edited by Greg Restall.
    Consequence is at the heart of logic, and an account of consequence offers a vital tool in the evaluation of arguments. This text presents what the authors term as 'logical pluralism' arguing that the notion of logical consequence doesn't pin down one deductive consequence relation; it allows for many of them.
  32. The problem of consciousness.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1992 - Scientific American 267 (3):152-60.
  33.  16
    Some further ideas regarding the neuronal basis of awareness.Christof Koch & Francis Crick - 1994 - In Christof Koch & J. Davis (eds.), Large-Scale Neuronal Theories of the Brain. MIT Press. pp. 93.
  34.  83
    Understanding awareness at the neuronal level.Christof Koch & Francis Crick - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):683-685.
  35. Essays on Citizenship.B. Crick - 2001 - British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (2):220-221.
     
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  36.  53
    There is Beauty Here, Too: Aristotle's Rhetoric for Science.John Poulakos & Nathan Crick - 2012 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 45 (3):295-311.
    In Aristotle's biological treatise, On the Parts of Animals, one finds a rare and unexpected burst of rhetorical eloquence. While justifying the study of “less valued animals,” he erupts into praise for the study of all natural phenomena and condemns the small-mindedness of those who trivialize its worth. Without equal in Aristotle's remaining works for its rhetorical quality, it reveals the otherwise coolheaded researcher as a passionate seeker of truth and an unabashed lover of natural beauty. For Aristotle, rhetoric not (...)
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  37. What Happens When Someone Acts?J. David Velleman - 1992 - Mind 101 (403):461-481.
    What happens when someone acts? A familiar answer goes like this. There is something that the agent wants, and there is an action that he believes conducive to its attainment. His desire for the end, and his belief in the action as a means, justify taking the action, and they jointly cause an intention to take it, which in turn causes the corresponding movements of the agent's body. I think that the standard story is flawed in several respects. The flaw (...)
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  38. Citizenship, discourse ethics and an emancipatory model of lifelong learning.Clarence W. Joldersma & Ruth Deakin Crick - 2010 - In Mark Murphy & Ted Fleming (eds.), Habermas, critical theory and education. New York: Routledge.
     
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  39. Prolegomena to a philosophy of religion.J. L. Schellenberg - 2005 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    Providing an original and systematic treatment of foundational issues in philosophy of religion, J. L. Schellenberg's new book addresses the structure of..
  40. A neurobiological framework for consciousness.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 567--579.
  41. On the zombie within.Christof Koch & Francis Crick - 2001 - Nature 411 (6840):893-893.
  42.  4
    Habermas, lifelong learning and citizenship education.Ruth Deakin Crick & Clarence Joldersma - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (2):77-95.
    Citizenship and its education is again gaining importance in many countries. This paper uses England as its primary example to develop a Habermasian perspective on this issue. The statutory requirements for citizenship education in England imply that significant attention be given to the moral and social development of the learner over time, to the active engagement of the learner in community and to the knowledge skills and understanding necessary for political action. This paper sets out a theoretical framework that offers (...)
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  43.  11
    Rem Slep And Neural Nets.Francis Crick - 1986 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 7 (2-3).
  44.  56
    The presuppositions of citizenship education.Bernard Crick - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (3):337–352.
    In the Western tradition citizenship is part of the good life, but can never be enforced on people. Some modern views see liberty as only a consumer or private ‘good’ detached from civic obligations. However, an education that creates a disposition to active citizenship is a necessary condition of free societies. Education is training and learning towards freedom, and freedom is closely linked to an understanding of the concept of the political as a matter of peaceful compromises of values and (...)
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  45.  50
    Habermas, lifelong learning and citizenship education.Ruth Deakin Crick & Clarence W. Joldersma - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (2):77-95.
    Citizenship and its education is again gaining importance in many countries. This paper uses England as its primary example to develop a Habermasian perspective on this issue. The statutory requirements for citizenship education in England imply that significant attention be given to the moral and social development of the learner over time, to the active engagement of the learner in community and to the knowledge skills and understanding necessary for political action. This paper sets out a theoretical framework that offers (...)
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  46. Performative Utterances.J. L. Austin - 1961 - In John Langshaw Austin (ed.), Philosophical Papers. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press.
     
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  47.  52
    Cortical areas in visual awareness.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1995 - Nature 377:294-5.
  48.  63
    Citizenship: The political and the democratic.Bernard Crick - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (3):235-248.
    Citizenship as a compulsory subject was added to the National Curriculum in England in 2002 following the 1998 report, 'Education for Citizenship and the Teaching of Democracy in Schools'. It was little noticed at the time that the report stressed active citizenship much more strongly than democracy. The underlying presupposition was what historians call 'civic republicanism' the tradition from the Greeks and the Romans of good government as political government, that is, citizens reaching acceptable compromises of group interests and values (...)
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  49. Truth.J. L. Austin - 2005-01-01 - In José Medina & David Wood (eds.), Truth. Blackwell.
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  50.  5
    The Presuppositions of Citizenship Education.Bernard Crick - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (3):337-352.
    In the Western tradition citizenship is part of the good life, but can never be enforced on people. Some modern views see liberty as only a consumer or private ‘good’ detached from civic obligations. However, an education that creates a disposition to active citizenship is a necessary condition of free societies. Education is training and learning towards freedom, and freedom is closely linked to an understanding of the concept of the political as a matter of peaceful compromises of values and (...)
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