Results for 'J. David Reed'

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  1.  55
    Honesty, Individualism, and Pragmatic Business Ethics: Implications for Corporate Hierarchy. [REVIEW]J. Kevin Quinn, J. David Reed, M. Neil Browne & Wesley J. Hiers - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1419-1430.
    The boundaries of honesty are the focal point of this exploration of the individualistic origins of modernist ethics and the consequent need for a more pragmatic approach to business ethics. The tendency of modernist ethics to see honesty as an individual responsibility is described as a contextually naive approach, one that fails to account for the interactive effects between individual choices and corporate norms. By reviewing the empirical accounts of managerial struggles with ethical dilemmas, the article arrives at the contextual (...)
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  2.  8
    A Note on Reaction Time as a Test of Color Discrimination.J. David Reed - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (1):118.
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  3.  23
    Factors Influencing the Latency of Simple Reaction Time.David L. Woods, John M. Wyma, E. William Yund, Timothy J. Herron & Bruce Reed - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  4.  16
    Age-Related Slowing of Response Selection and Production in a Visual Choice Reaction Time Task.David L. Woods, John M. Wyma, E. William Yund, Timothy J. Herron & Bruce Reed - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  5.  19
    Corrigendum: Age-Related Slowing of Response Selection and Production in a Visual Choice Reaction Time Task.David L. Woods, John M. Wyma, E. William Yund, Timothy J. Herron & Bruce Reed - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  6.  16
    Associations Between Attention, Affect and Cardiac Activity in a Single Yoga Session for Female Cancer Survivors: An Enactive Neurophenomenology-Based Approach.Michael J. Mackenzie, Linda E. Carlson, David M. Paskevich, Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Amanda J. Wurz, Kathryn Wytsma, Katie A. Krenz, Edward McAuley & S. Nicole Culos-Reed - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:129-146.
  7.  35
    An Inductive Model of Collaboration From the Stakeholder's Perspective.Kenneth D. Butterfield, Richard Reed & David J. Lemak - 2004 - Business and Society 43 (2):162-195.
  8.  3
    Crusading for Chemistry: The Professional Career of Charles Holmes Herty. Germaine M. Reed.David J. Rhees - 1996 - Isis 87 (2):381-382.
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  9.  35
    A New Scale to Measure Family Members' Perception of Community Health Care Services for Persons with Huntington Disease.Valmi D. Sousa, Janet K. Williams, Jack J. Barnette & David A. Reed - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):470-475.
  10.  40
    Willing the Law J. David Velleman.J. David Velleman - 2004 - In Peter Baumann & Monika Betzler (eds.), Practical Conflicts: New Philosophical Essays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 27.
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  11.  72
    XIV. Don't Worry, Feel Guilty*: J. David Velleman.J. David Velleman - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:235-248.
    One can feel guilty without thinking that one actually is guilty of moral wrongdoing. For example, one can feel guilty about eating an ice cream or skipping aerobics, even if one doesn't take a moralistic view of self-indulgence. And one can feel guilty about things that aren't one's doing at all, as in the case of survivor's guilt about being spared some catastrophe suffered by others. Guilt without perceived wrongdoing may of course be irrational, but I think it is sometimes (...)
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  12.  23
    The Aesthete in the City: The Philosophy and Practice of American Abstract Painting in the 1980s.David Carrier - 1994 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    In the 1980s, when the American art market flourished, critics were heavily concerned with theory. In T_he Aesthete in the City_ David Carrier offers a personal view on the artistic activity of that decade. He begins with a theoretical perspective on the relationship between two very different forms of artwriting: art criticism and art history writing. Carrier surveys the developments within theory during the 1980s, focusing on constructive critical analysis of the then fashionable work of Jean Baudrillard, Walter Benjamin, (...)
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  13. The Possibility of Practical Reason.J. David Velleman - 1996 - Ethics 106 (4):694-726.
  14. Love as a Moral Emotion.J. David Velleman - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):338-374.
  15. How We Get Along.J. David Velleman - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    In How We Get Along, philosopher David Velleman compares our social interactions to the interactions among improvisational actors on stage. He argues that we play ourselves - not artificially but authentically, by doing what would make sense coming from us as we really are. And, like improvisational actors, we deal with one another in dual capacities: both as characters within the social drama and as players contributing to the shared performance. In this conception of social intercourse, Velleman finds rational (...)
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  16. Emerging From Imaginary Time.Robert J. Deltete & Reed A. Guy - 1996 - Synthese 108 (2):185 - 203.
    Recent models in quantum cosmology make use of the concept of imaginary time. These models all conjecture a join between regions of imaginary time and regions of real time. We examine the model of James Hartle and Stephen Hawking to argue that the various no-boundary attempts to interpret the transition from imaginary to real time in a logically consistent and physically significant way all fail. We believe this conclusion also applies to quantum tunneling models, such as that proposed by Alexander (...)
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  17. Foundations for Moral Relativism.J. David Velleman - 2013 - OpenBook Publishers.
    In Foundations for Moral Relativism, J. David Velleman shows that different communities can indeed be subject to incompatible moralities, because their local mores are rationally binding. At the same time, he explains why the mores of different communities, even when incompatible, are still variations on the same moral themes. The book thus maps out a universe of many moral worlds without, as Velleman puts it, "moral black holes”. The five self-standing chapters discuss such diverse topics as online avatars and (...)
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  18. What Happens When Someone Acts?J. David Velleman - 1992 - Mind 101 (403):461-481.
    What happens when someone acts? A familiar answer goes like this. There is something that the agent wants, and there is an action that he believes conducive to its attainment. His desire for the end, and his belief in the action as a means, justify taking the action, and they jointly cause an intention to take it, which in turn causes the corresponding movements of the agent's body. I think that the standard story is flawed in several respects. The flaw (...)
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  19. Practical Reflection.J. David Velleman - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (1):33-61.
    “What do you see when you look at your face in the mirror?” asks J. David Velleman in introducing his philosophical theory of action. He takes this simple act of self-scrutiny as a model for the reflective reasoning of rational agents: our efforts to understand our existence and conduct are aided by our efforts to make it intelligible. Reflective reasoning, Velleman argues, constitutes practical reasoning. By applying this conception, _Practical Reflection_ develops philosophical accounts of intention, free will, and the (...)
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  20.  92
    Self to Self: Selected Essays.J. David Velleman - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Self to Self brings together essays on personal identity, autonomy, and moral emotions by the distinguished philosopher J. David Velleman. Although each of the essays was written as an independent piece, they are unified by an overarching thesis, that there is no single entity denoted by 'the self', as well as by themes from Kantian ethics, psychoanalytic theory, social psychology, and Velleman's work in the philosophy of action. Two of the essays were selected by the editors of Philosophers' Annual (...)
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  21. How To Share An Intention.J. David Velleman - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):29-50.
    Existing accounts of shared intention do not claim that a single token of intention can be jointly framed and executed by multiple agents; rather, they claim that multiple agents can frame distinct, individual intentions in such a way as to qualify as jointly intending something. In this respect, the existing accounts do not show that intentions can be shared in any literal sense. This article argues that, in failing to show how intentions can be literally shared, these accounts fail to (...)
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  22. Well-Being and Time.J. David Velleman - 1991 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 72 (1):48-77.
  23.  32
    The Possibility of Practical Reason.J. David Velleman - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 121 (3):263-275.
  24. Narrative Explanation.J. David Velleman - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (1):1-25.
    A story does more than recount events; it recounts events in a way that renders them intelligible, thus conveying not just information but also understanding. We might therefore be tempted to describe narrative as a genre of explanation. When the police invite a suspect to “tell his story,” they are asking him to explain the blood on his shirt or his absence from home on the night of the murder; and whether he is judged to have a “good story” will (...)
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  25. Self to Self.J. David Velleman - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):39 - 76.
    Images of myself being Napoleon can scarcely merely be images of the physical figure of Napoleon.... They will rather be images of, for instance, the desolation at Austerlitz as viewed by me vaguely aware of my short stature and my cockaded hat, my hand in my tunic.
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  26. A Right of Self‐Termination?J. David Velleman - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):606-628.
  27. How to Endure.J. David Velleman & Thomas Hofweber - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):37 - 57.
    The terms `endurance' and `perdurance' are commonly thought to denote distinct ways for an object to persist, but it is surprisingly hard to say what these are. The common approach, defining them in terms of temporal parts, is mistaken, because it does not lead to two coherent philosophical alternatives: endurance so understood becomes conceptually incoherent, while perdurance becomes not just true but a conceptual truth. Instead, we propose a different way to articulate the distinction, in terms of identity rather than (...)
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  28. What Good is a Will?J. David Velleman - 2007 - In Anton Leist & Holger Baumann (eds.), Action in Context. de Gruyter/Mouton.
    As a philosopher of action, I might be expected to believe that the will is a good thing. Actually, I believe that the will is a great thing - awesome, in fact. But I'm not thereby committed to its being something good. When I say that the will is awesome, I mean literally that it is a proper object of awe, a response that restrains us from abusing the will and moves us rather to use it respectfully, in a way (...)
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  29. Family History.J. David Velleman - 2005 - Philosophical Papers 34 (3):357-378.
    Abstract I argue that meaning in life is importantly influenced by bioloical ties. More specifically, I maintain that knowing one's relatives and especially one's parents provides a kind of self-knowledge that is of irreplaceable value in the life-task of identity formation. These claims lead me to the conclusion that it is immoral to create children with the intention that they be alienated from their bioloical relatives?for example, by donor conception.
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  30.  58
    The Study of Animal Metacognition.J. David Smith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (9):389-396.
  31. The Self as Narrator.J. David Velleman - 2005 - In Joel Anderson & John Christman (eds.), Autonomy and the Challenges to Liberalism: New Essays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  32. The Genesis of Shame.J. David Velleman - 2001 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (1):27-52.
  33. Beyond Price.J. David Velleman - 2008 - Ethics 118 (2):191-212.
  34. Against the Right to Die.J. David Velleman - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (6):665-681.
    How a "right to die" may become a "coercive option".
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  35.  8
    Animal Research Through a Lens: Transparency on Animal Research.J. W. Yeates & B. Reed - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (7):504-505.
  36.  24
    The Uncertain Response in the Bottlenosed Dolphin ( Tursiops Truncatus ).J. David Smith, Jonathan Schull, Jared Strote, Kelli McGee, Roian Egnor & Linda Erb - 1995 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 124 (4):391.
  37. Intention, Plans, and Practical Reason.J. David Velleman - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):277-284.
  38. The Way of the Wanton.J. David Velleman - 2008 - In Catriona Mackenzie & Kim Atkins (eds.), Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.
    Harry Frankfurt's philosophy of action as a prolegomenon to the Zhuangzi.
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  39. Practical Reflection.J. David Velleman - 1991 - Ethics 102 (1):117-128.
     
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  40. Hartle-Hawking Cosmology and Unconditional Probabilities.Robert J. Deltete & Reed A. Guy - 1997 - Analysis 57 (4):304–315.
  41. Motivation by Ideal.J. David Velleman - 2002 - Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):89-103.
    I offer an account of how ideals motivate us. My account suggests that although emulating an ideal is often rational, it can lead us to do irrational things.
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  42.  11
    How to Share an Intention.J. David Velleman - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):29-50.
    Existing accounts of shared intention do not claim that a single token of intention can be jointly framed and executed by multiple agents; rather, they claim that multiple agents can frame distinct, individual intentions in such a way as to qualify as jointly intending something. In this respect, the existing accounts do not show that intentions can be shared in any literal sense. This article argues that, in failing to show how intentions can be literally shared, these accounts fail to (...)
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  43. The Identity Problem.J. David Velleman - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (3):221 - 244.
  44. Deciding How to Decide.J. David Velleman - 1997 - In Garrett Cullity & Berys Nigel Gaut (eds.), Ethics and Practical Reason. Oxford University Press. pp. 29--52.
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  45.  36
    I. The Identity Problem.J. David Velleman - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (3):221-244.
  46.  3
    Overall Similarity in Adults' Classification: The Child in All of Us.J. David Smith & Deborah G. Kemler - 1984 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 113 (1):137-159.
  47.  2
    7. What Happens When Someone Acts?J. David Velleman - 1993 - In John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza (eds.), Perspectives on Moral Responsibility. Cornell University Press. pp. 188-210.
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  48.  71
    Brandt's Definition of "Good".J. David Velleman - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):353-371.
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  49.  16
    Narrative Explanation.J. David Velleman - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (1):1-25.
    A story does more than recount events; it recounts events in a way that renders them intelligible, thus conveying not just information but also understanding. We might therefore be tempted to describe narrative as a genre of explanation. When the police invite a suspect to “tell his story,” they are asking him to explain the blood on his shirt or his absence from home on the night of the murder; and whether he is judged to have a “good story” will (...)
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  50. The Voice of Conscience.J. David Velleman - 1999 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (1):57–76.
    I reconstruct Kant's derivation of the Categorical Imperative (CI) as an argument that deduces what the voice of conscience must say from how it must sound - that is, from the authority that is metaphorically attributed to conscience in the form of a resounding voice. The idea of imagining the CI as the voice of conscience comes from Freud; and the present reconstruction is part of a larger project that aims to reconcile Kant's moral psychology with Freud's theory of moral (...)
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