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  1.  33
    Francis of Assisi and the Diversity of Creation.J. Donald Hughes - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (3):311-320.
    Francis’ view of nature has been seen as positive in an ecological sense even by those who are for the most part critical of Christianity’s attitude to nature, such as Lynn White, Jr. I argue that one element of Francis’ uniqueness was that he saw the diversity of life as an expression of God’s creativity and benevolence and attempted to carry out that vision in ethical behavior. Much of what has been written about him has precedents in traditional hagiography, but (...)
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  2.  47
    Ecology in Ancient Greece.J. Donald Hughes - 1975 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):115 – 125.
    This article investigates the characteristic attitudes of the Greeks toward nature, which formed the perceptual framework for their ecological thinking. Two major attitudes are discerned. One regarded nature as the theatre of the gods, whose interplay produced observed phenomena, but whose localization gave them particular, restricted roles. The other attitude viewed nature as the theatre of reason, and made the beginnings of ecological thought possible. The contributions of several Greek forerunners in the field of ecology are characterized. The most consistent, (...)
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  3.  33
    Ancient Deforestation Revisited.J. Donald Hughes - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (1):43 - 57.
    The image of the classical Mediterranean environment of the Greeks and Romans had a formative influence on the art, literature, and historical perception of modern Europe and America. How closely does is this image congruent with the ancient environment as it in reality existed? In particular, how forested was the ancient Mediterranean world, was there deforestation, and if so, what were its effects? The consensus of historians, geographers, and other scholars from the mid-nineteenth century through the first three quarters of (...)
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  4.  10
    Carolyn Merchant. Autonomous Nature: Problems of Prediction and Control From Ancient Times to the Scientific Revolution. Xiii + 196 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. New York/London: Routledge, 2015. £29.99. [REVIEW]J. Donald Hughes - 2017 - Isis 108 (4):868-869.
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  5.  19
    Mountains Without Handrails.J. Donald Hughes - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (4):369-371.
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    Mountains Without Handrails: Reflections on the National Parks. [REVIEW]J. Donald Hughes - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (4):369-371.
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  7.  99
    The Environmental Ethics of the Pythagoreans.J. Donald Hughes - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (3):195-213.
    Two conflicting tendencies may be discerned in Pythagorean ethics as applied to the environment: on the one hand, a sense of reverence for nature and kinship with all life that opposed killing and other forms of interference in the natural world, and on the other hand, a doctrine of the separability of soul and body which denigrates the body and the external world of which it is apart. The prescriptive content of Pythagorean ethics includes prohibitions against taking life, even in (...)
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