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J. Edward Hackett
Southern University
  1.  18
    The Lived-Experience of Humanism in Husserl and James.J. Edward Hackett - 2013 - Philo 16 (2):196-215.
    In this paper, I will argue that the experiential-based approaches of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology and William James’s radical empiricism can help inform an account of humanism more rooted in concrete experience. Specifically, I will outline a form of humanism closely connected to the conceptual similarities between James’s radical empiricism and the general character of Husserl’s phenomenology of experience. Whereas many forms of humanism are underscored by an eliminativist impulse, I sketch a humanism of lived-experience more motivated by the restrictive and (...)
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  2. House of Cards and Philosophy: Underwood's Republic.J. Edward Hackett (ed.) - 2015 - Wiley.
    Is Democracy overrated? Does power corrupt? Or do corrupt people seek power? Do corporate puppet masters pull politicians’ strings? Why does Frank talk to the camera? Can politics deliver on the promise of justice? House of Cards depicts our worst fears about politics today. Love him or loathe him, Frank Underwood has charted an inimitable course through Washington politics. He and his cohorts depict the darkest dealings within the gleaming halls of our most revered political institutions. These 24 original essays (...)
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  3.  11
    Introduction to WJS Special Issue: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, Cognitive Science.J. Edward Hackett - 2016 - William James Studies 12 (1).
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  4.  19
    Reviving Scheler’s Phenomenological Account of the Person for the 21ˢᵗ Century.J. Edward Hackett - 2014 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 19 (1):27-41.
    In the following article, I discuss the root of Scheler’s account of the person, its origin in phenomenology and the larger impact that view has as an alternative to other conceptions of the person. My thesis in this article intends to show why we should start with Scheler’s phenomenology over other approaches to the person. First, I take a look at what theoretical resources Scheler’s phenomenology has to offer us, and secondly, I outline the cultural conditions as to why the (...)
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  5.  3
    Scheler, Heidegger and the Hermeneutics of Value.J. Edward Hackett - 2013 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 2013 (1).
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  6.  3
    The Process-Oriented Conception of Truth in William James.J. Edward Hackett - 2020 - Process Studies 49 (2):209-233.
    In this article, I argue that William Jamess concept of truth can be interpreted accurately if we pay attention to the radical empiricism that underlines the notion in all of James's later writings and if we also see radical empiricism as a type of process thought. When we acknowledge these two conditions, we can see how Cheryl Misak is mistaken in reinscribing subjectivism back into Jamess radical empiricism, which attempted to overcome the subject-object distinction in the first place. In reading (...)
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  7.  9
    The Phenomenological Realism of James's Theory of Value.J. Edward Hackett - 2016 - William James Studies 12 (1).
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  8.  8
    Value Commensurability in Brightman and Scheler: Towards a Process Metaethics.J. Edward Hackett - 2019 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 3 (1):104-121.
    In the following paper, both Max Scheler and Edgar Sheffield Brightman’s rankings of value are compared. In so doing, Brightman’s table of values is found wanting along the lines of Scheler’s value rankings. The reason is, in part, that Scheler’s ordering of preference and hierarchy of feelings more readily explain what Brightman’s account presupposes: affective intentionality. What is more, we can apply Brightman’s test of consistency to Scheler’s account and find it more desirable than how Brightman defines what values are (...)
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  9. Phenomenology for the Twenty-First Century.J. Aaron Simmons & J. Edward Hackett (eds.) - 2016 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
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