5 found
Order:
  1. Attention, Affirmation, and the Spiritual Law of Gravity.J. Heath Atchley - 2010 - The Pluralist 5 (3):63-72.
    All of us had fallen from 100 stories.Falling is rarely a good thing. It is something to avoid for safety, and such avoidance, for those of us fortunate enough to be in good health, has been burned into the unconscious memory of our muscles and bones. Unless we find ourselves in high places, or on some kind of precipice, falling tends not to be on the mind. It is, most of the time, a surprise.But it is also always a possibility, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  14
    Encountering the Secular: Philosophical Endeavors in Religion and Culture.J. Heath Atchley - 2009 - University of Virginia Press.
    Prologue: Encounter -- Confrontation -- Silence -- Mourning -- Presence -- Enlightenment -- Disturbance -- Practice -- Event -- Epilogue: Endeavor.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  1
    Smoke and the Practice of Philosophy.J. Heath Atchley - 2008 - Film and Philosophy 12:41.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Death of Emerson: Writing, Loss, and Divine Presence.J. Heath Atchley - 2006 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (4):251 - 265.
    When I cruise the forty-three television channels available to me (and that's basic cable), simultaneously being enchanted and disgusted by much that I see (a kind of Kantian sublime), I cannot help but think that the culture in which I find myself is less articulate than ever. For this situation perhaps the 43rd President of the United States could serve as a useful emblem—a joke that is all too easy to make. But such a diagnosis of the low standard of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Loss of Language, the Language of Loss: Thinking with DeLillo on Terror and Mourning.J. Heath Atchley - 2004 - Janus Head 7 (2):333-354.
    This essay is a philosophical reading of Don DeLillo’s novel, The Body Artist, and his essay, “In the Ruins of the Future.” Focusing on the issues of loss, mourning, and terror after the attacks of September the 11th, I argue that DeLillo gives a picture of mourning as something that occurs through a loss of language. This loss does not end language; instead, it occurs through language.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark