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    Knowing and Not Knowing ISIS.J. Judd Owen - 2019 - Critical Review 31 (1):113-122.
    ABSTRACTGraeme Wood’s The Way of the Strangers suggests that many scholars have denied or downplayed the Islamic State’s own account of its emphatically religious foundation. This tendency is heir to the Enlightenment strategy of defanging illiberal religion by claiming that only religions conforming to liberal principles are genuinely religious—raising anew questions that arose at the dawn of liberalism, in the wake of the Wars of Religion.
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  2. Recovering Reason: Essays in Honor of Thomas L. Pangle.Peter J. Ahrensdorf, Arlene Saxonhouse, Steven Forde, Paul A. Rahe, Michael Zuckert, Devin Stauffer, David Leibowitz, Robert Goldberg, Christopher Bruell, Linda R. Rabieh, Richard S. Ruderman, Christopher Baldwin, J. Judd Owen, Waller R. Newell, Nathan Tarcov, Ross J. Corbett, Clifford Orwin, John W. Danford, Heinrich Meier, Fred Baumann, Robert C. Bartlett, Ralph Lerner, Bryan-Paul Frost, Laurie Fendrich, Donald Kagan, H. Donald Forbes & Norman Doidge - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    Recovering Reason: Essays in Honor of Thomas L. Pangle is a collection of essays composed by students and friends of Thomas L. Pangle to honor his seminal work and outstanding guidance in the study of political philosophy. These essays examine both Socrates' and modern political philosophers' attempts to answer the question of the right life for human beings, as those attempts are introduced and elaborated in the work of thinkers from Homer and Thucydides to Nietzsche and Charles Taylor.
     
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  3. Making Religion Safe for Democracy: Transformation From Hobbes to Tocqueville.J. Judd Owen - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Does the toleration of liberal democratic society mean that religious faiths are left substantively intact, so long as they respect the rights of others? Or do liberal principles presuppose a deeper transformation of religion? Does life in democratic society itself transform religion? In Making Religion Safe for Democracy, J. Judd Owen explores these questions by tracing a neglected strand of Enlightenment political thought that presents a surprisingly unified reinterpretation of Christianity by Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Thomas Jefferson. Owen then (...)
     
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  4. Religion, the Enlightenment, and the New Global Order.John M. Owen Iv & J. Judd Owen (eds.) - 2011 - Columbia University Press.
    Largely due to the cultural and political shift of the Enlightenment, Western societies in the eighteenth century emerged from sectarian conflict and embraced a more religiously moderate path. In nine original essays, leading scholars ask whether exporting the Enlightenment solution is possible—or even desirable—today. Contributors begin by revisiting the Enlightenment's restructuring of the West, examining its ongoing encounters with Protestant and Catholic Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and Hinduism. While acknowledging the necessity of the Enlightenment emphasis on toleration and peaceful religious coexistence, (...)
     
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