Results for 'J. Kevin Quinn'

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  1.  55
    Honesty, Individualism, and Pragmatic Business Ethics: Implications for Corporate Hierarchy. [REVIEW]J. Kevin Quinn, J. David Reed, M. Neil Browne & Wesley J. Hiers - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1419-1430.
    The boundaries of honesty are the focal point of this exploration of the individualistic origins of modernist ethics and the consequent need for a more pragmatic approach to business ethics. The tendency of modernist ethics to see honesty as an individual responsibility is described as a contextually naive approach, one that fails to account for the interactive effects between individual choices and corporate norms. By reviewing the empirical accounts of managerial struggles with ethical dilemmas, the article arrives at the contextual (...)
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  2.  4
    Economism, Pragmatism and Pedagogy.J. Kevin Quinn & M. Neil Browne - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (2):163–173.
  3. Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’T Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”.J. Kevin O’Regan & Ned Block - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of (...)
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  4. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.J. Kevin O’Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
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  5. The 'Feel'of Seeing:: An Interview with J. Kevin O'Regan.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):278-279.
  6.  6
    What Would the Robots Play? Interview with J. Kevin O’Regan.J. Kevin O’Regan, Włodzisław Duch, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (2).
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  7. What It is Like to See: A Sensorimotor Theory of Perceptual Experience.J. Kevin O’Regan - 2001 - Synthese 129 (1):79-103.
    The paper proposes a way of bridging the gapbetween physical processes in the brain and the ''''felt''''aspect of sensory experience. The approach is based onthe idea that experience is not generated by brainprocesses themselves, but rather is constituted by theway these brain processes enable a particular form of''''give-and-take'''' between the perceiver and theenvironment. From this starting-point we are able tocharacterize the phenomenological differences betweenthe different sensory modalities in a more principledway than has been done in the past. We are also (...)
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  8. Sensorimotor Theory and Enactivism.Jan Degenaar & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):393-407.
    The sensorimotor theory of perceptual consciousness offers a form of enactivism in that it stresses patterns of interaction instead of any alleged internal representations of the environment. But how does it relate to forms of enactivism stressing the continuity between life and mind? We shall distinguish sensorimotor enactivism, which stresses perceptual capacities themselves, from autopoietic enactivism, which claims an essential connection between experience and autopoietic processes or associated background capacities. We show how autopoiesis, autonomous agency, and affective dimensions of experience (...)
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  9.  37
    Perceptual Consciousness, Access to Modality and Skill Theories: A Way to Naturalize Phenomenology?Erik Myin & J. Kevin O'Regan - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):27-45.
    We address the thesis recently proposed by Andy Clark, that skill-mediated access to modality implies phenomenal feel. We agree that a skill theory of perception does indeed offer the possibility of a satisfactory account of the feel of perception, but we claim that this is not only through explanation of access to modality but also because skill actually provides access to perceptual property in general. We illustrate and substantiate our claims by reference to the recently proposed 'sensorimotor contingency' theory of (...)
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  10.  88
    Picture Changes During Blinks: Looking Without Seeing and Seeing Without Looking.J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & R. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized.
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  11.  55
    In Praise of Monica.J. Kevin Coyle - 1982 - Augustinian Studies 13:87-96.
  12. To See or Not to See: The Need for Attention to Perceive Changes in Scenes.Ronald A. Rensink, J. Kevin O'Regan & James J. Clark - 1997 - Psychological Science 8:368-373.
    Methods. We employed a "flicker" technique, in which an original and a modified image (each of duration 240 ms) continually alternated, with a blank field (duration 80 ms) between each display. Images were all of real-world scenes. One of three kinds of change (appearance/disappearance, color, or translation) was made to an object or region in each scene. Changes were large and easily seen under normal conditions. Subjects viewed the flicker display, and pressed a key when they noticed the change.
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  13.  15
    2002 St. Augustine Lecture.J. Kevin Coyle - 2003 - Augustinian Studies 34 (1):1-22.
  14. How to Build a Robot That is Conscious and Feels.J. Kevin O’Regan - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (2):117-136.
    Following arguments put forward in my book (Why red doesn’t sound like a bell: understanding the feel of consciousness. Oxford University Press, New York, USA, 2011), this article takes a pragmatic, scientist’s point of view about the concepts of consciousness and “feel”, pinning down what people generally mean when they talk about these concepts, and then investigating to what extent these capacities could be implemented in non-biological machines. Although the question of “feel”, or “phenomenal consciousness” as it is called by (...)
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  15.  8
    Phenomenal Consciousness Explained (Better) in Terms of Bodiliness and Grabbiness.J. Kevin O’Regan, Erik Myin & Alva NOë - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):369-387.
    How could neural processes be associated with phenomenal consciousness? We present a way to answer this question by taking the counterintuitive stance that the sensory feel of an experience is not a thing that happens to us, but a thing we do: a skill we exercise. By additionally noting that sensory systems possess two important, objectively measurable properties, corporality and alerting capacity, we are able to explain why sensory experience possesses a sensory feel, but thinking and other mental processes do (...)
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  16.  1
    J.C. QUINN In Search of the Phoenicians. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018. Pp. 335. £32.95. 9780691175270.Michael Sommer - forthcoming - Journal of Hellenic Studies:1-2.
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  17.  63
    Skill, Corporality and Alerting Capacity in an Account of Sensory Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan, Erik Myin & Alva Noë - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
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  18.  9
    Saint Augustine's Manichaean Legacy.J. Kevin Coyle - 2003 - Augustinian Studies 34 (1):1-22.
  19. On the Brain-Basis of Visual Consciousness: A Sensorimotor Account.Alva Noë & J. Kevin O'Regan - 2002 - In A. Noe & E. Thompson (eds.), Vision and Mind: Selected Readings in the Philosophy of Perception. MIT Press. pp. 567--598.
  20. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness-Authors' Response-Acting Out Our Sensory Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan & A. Noe - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1011.
  21.  69
    A New Imagery Debate: Enactive and Sensorimotor Accounts.Lucia Foglia & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (1):181-196.
    Traditionally, the “Imagery Debate” has opposed two main camps: depictivism and descriptivism. This debate has essentially focused on the nature of the internal representations thought to be involved in imagery, without addressing at all the question of action. More recently, a third, “embodied” view is moving the debate into a new phase. The embodied approach focuses on the interdependence of perception, cognition and action, and in its more radical line this approach promotes the idea that perception is not a process (...)
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  22.  13
    Commentary on Mossio and Taraborelli: Is the Enactive Approach Really Sensorimotor?☆.Frédéric Pascal & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1341-1342.
  23.  73
    Acting Out Our Sensory Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1011-1021.
    The most important clarification we bring in our reply to commentators concerns the problem of the “explanatory gap”: that is, the gulf that separates physical processes in the brain from the experienced quality of sensations. By adding two concepts (bodiliness and grabbiness) that were not stressed in the target article, we strengthen our claim and clarify why we think we have solved the explanatory gap problem, – not by dismissing qualia, but, on the contrary, by explaining why sensations have a (...)
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  24.  6
    Commentary on Mossio and Taraborelli: Is the Enactive Approach Really Sensorimotor?Frédéric Pascal & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1341-1342.
  25. The Philosophical Challenge of Religious Diversity.Philip L. Quinn & Kevin Meeker (eds.) - 1999 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This unique volume collects some of the best recent work on the philosophical challenge that religious diversity poses for religious belief. Featuring contributors from philosophy, religious studies, and theology, it is unified by the way in which many of the authors engage in sustained critical examination of one another's positions. John Hick's pluralism provides one focal point of the collection. Hick argues that all the major religious traditions make contact with the same ultimate reality, each encountering it through a variety (...)
     
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  26.  71
    Deficient Critical Thinking Skills Among College Graduates: Implications for Leadership.Kevin L. Flores, Gina S. Matkin, Mark E. Burbach, Courtney E. Quinn & Heath Harding - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):212-230.
    Although higher education understands the need to develop critical thinkers, it has not lived up to the task consistently. Students are graduating deficient in these skills, unprepared to think critically once in the workforce. Limited development of cognitive processing skills leads to less effective leaders. Various definitions of critical thinking are examined to develop a general construct to guide the discussion as critical thinking is linked to constructivism, leadership, and education. Most pedagogy is content-based built on deep knowledge. Successful critical (...)
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  27.  48
    Experience is Not Something We Feel but Something We Do: A Principled Way of Explaining Sensory Phenomenology, with Change Blindness and Other Empirical Consequences.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Any theory of experience which postulates that brain mechanisms generate "raw feel" encounters the impassable "explanatory gap" separating physics from phenomenology.
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  28.  25
    Phenomenal Consciousness Lite: No Thanks!J. Kevin O'Regan & Erik Myin - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):520-521.
    The target article appeals to recent empirical data to support the idea that there is more to phenomenality than is available to access consciousness. However, this claim is based on an unwarranted assumption, namely, that some kind of cortical processing must be phenomenal. The article also considerably weakens Block's original distinction between a truly nonfunctional phenomenal consciousness and a functional access consciousness. The new form of phenomenal consciousness seems to be a poor-man's cognitive access.
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  29.  6
    Formen Und Funktionen der Vergilzitate Bei Augustin von Hippo: Formen Und Funktionen der Zitate Und Anspielungen. [REVIEW]J. Kevin Coyle - 2004 - Augustinian Studies 35 (2):332-335.
  30.  23
    Les Confessions de Saint Augustin: Classiques du Christianisme. [REVIEW]J. Kevin Coyle - 2008 - Augustinian Studies 39 (2):298-300.
  31.  81
    Reflections on Whitman, Dewey, and Educational Reform: Recovering Spiritual Democracy in Our Materialistic Times.J. Garrison & E. J. O'Quinn - 2004 - Education and Culture 20 (2):68-77.
  32.  96
    Explaining What People Say About Sensory Qualia.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2010 - In N. Gangopadhay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press. pp. 31--50.
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  33.  19
    Letter Legibility and Visual Word Recognition.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Word recognition performance varies systematically as a function of where the eyes fixate in the word. Performance is maximal with the eye slightly left of the center of the word, and decreases drastically to both sides of this 'Optimal Viewing Position'. While manipulations of lexical factors have only marginal effects on this phenomenon, previous studies have pointed to a relation between the viewing position effect and letter legibility: When letter legibility drops, the viewing position effect becomes more exaggerated. To further (...)
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  34.  31
    Change Blindness.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  35.  16
    Adapted Discourse.J. Kevin Coyle - 1999 - Augustinian Studies 30 (2):205-219.
  36. Agustín, el maniqueísmo y la contracepción.J. Kevin Coyle & J. Anoz - 1999 - Augustinus 44 (172-75):89-97.
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  37. Augustine's «Millennialism» Reconsidered.J. Kevin Coyle - 1993 - Augustinus 38:155-164.
     
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  38.  14
    BARC, Bernard, ROBERGE, Michel, L'Hypostase des Archontes. Traité Gnostique Sur l'Origine de l'Homme, du Monde Et des Archontes (NH II, 4), Suivi De. Noréa (NH IX, 2). [REVIEW]J. Kevin Coyle - 1981 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 37 (3):379-380.
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  39.  5
    Concordia.J. Kevin Coyle - 1982 - Augustinianum 22 (3):427-456.
  40.  13
    God’s Place in Augustine’s Anti-Manichaean Polemic.J. Kevin Coyle - 2007 - Augustinian Studies 38 (1):87-102.
  41.  21
    Language and Love.J. Kevin Coyle - 1996 - Augustinian Studies 27 (2):191-193.
  42.  13
    La Signification Et L’Enseignement.J. Kevin Coyle - 2009 - Augustinian Studies 40 (1):141-142.
  43.  16
    The Manichaean Body In Discipline and Ritual.J. Kevin Coyle - 2001 - Augustinian Studies 32 (2):263-265.
  44.  25
    Kant and the Early Moderns.Kevin J. - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):111-112.
    This volume contains ten essays that treat the relationship between Kant’s philosophy and those of his predecessors in the early modern canon. The essays divide into five pairs devoted respectively to Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. In each case, the work of a prominent Kant scholar precedes a reply by an early modernist. This format provides the opportunity to reevaluate both Kant’s philosophy and those of his predecessors, the contention being that the latter “in our historical conscience” too often (...)
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  45.  13
    The World as an Outside Iconic Memory – No Strong Internal Metric Means No Problem of Visual Stability.J. Kevin O'Regan - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):270-271.
  46. The Epistemic Benefit of Transient Diversity.Kevin J. S. Zollman - 2010 - Erkenntnis 72 (1):17-35.
    There is growing interest in understanding and eliciting division of labor within groups of scientists. This paper illustrates the need for this division of labor through a historical example, and a formal model is presented to better analyze situations of this type. Analysis of this model reveals that a division of labor can be maintained in two different ways: by limiting information or by endowing the scientists with extreme beliefs. If both features are present however, cognitive diversity is maintained indefinitely, (...)
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  47.  76
    Personal Ethics and Business Ethics: The Ethical Attitudes of Owner/ Managers of Small Business. [REVIEW]John J. Quinn - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):119-127.
    To date, the study of business ethics has been largely the study of the ethics of large companies. This paper is concerned with owner/managers of small firms and the link between the personal ethics of the owner/manager and his or her attitude to ethical problems in business. By using active membership of an organisation with an overt ethical dimension as a surrogate for personal ethics the research provides some, though not unequivocal, support for the models of Trevino and others that (...)
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  48. Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn.Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.) - 2008 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Philip Quinn, John A. O’Brien Professor at the University of Notre Dame from 1985 until his death in 2004, was well known for his work in the philosophy of religion, political philosophy, and core areas of analytic philosophy. Although the breadth of his interests was so great that it would be virtually impossible to identify any subset of them as representative, the contributors to this volume provide an excellent introduction to, and advance the discussion of, some of the questions (...)
     
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  49.  5
    Hermeneutics and Libertarianism: An Odd Couple.Kevin Quinn & Tina R. Green - 1998 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 12 (3):207-223.
    Abstract Recent writers in the libertarian tradition have suggested a natural affinity between hermeneutics and libertarian politics. This case is not persuasive. We look at two different ways the link has been attempted. In one, markets themselves are seen as constituting a hermeneutic conversation of sorts. A second approach uses hermeneutics to underpin the traditional liberal confinement of the state to setting the rules of the game?to matters of the right as opposed to the good. But the conception of the (...)
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  50.  72
    The Credit Economy and the Economic Rationality of Science.Kevin J. S. Zollman - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy 115 (1):5-33.
    Theories of scientific rationality typically pertain to belief. In this paper, the author argues that we should expand our focus to include motivations as well as belief. An economic model is used to evaluate whether science is best served by scientists motivated only by truth, only by credit, or by both truth and credit. In many, but not all, situations, scientists motivated by both truth and credit should be judged as the most rational scientists.
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